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02/16/2012 05:02 AM

Neurologist's findings tomorrow...(page 2)

lollipop
lollipop  
Posts: 4281
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Wow, married. It sounds like your husband went through exactly what my husband went through after his 2010 mania and then super depression. Remember, he wasn't able to think good and thought he might have Alzheimers. I literally saw my husband sit and cry because he couldn't absorb or retain information. His brain was impaired very badly for over a year. He even suffered some memory loss of our family experiences from early in our marriage. Alot of those are back, although there are some that aren't and may never be. He still doesn't remember some of the manic timeframe, but I'll never know if he ever eventually remembers that garbage, because we choose not to talk about it anymore. Married, I'm glad your husband got this testing done. And thank you for reporting back to us. Our husband's are very close in age and have the same diagnosis, other than my husband having catatonia along with big episodes. Although mania is harder on us, the depression appears to take it's toll hardest on them. Take care and tell your hubby to hang in there. If he is going through what my hubby did, there is a light at the end of the tunnel.
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02/16/2012 08:09 AM
justhurt
justhurt  
Posts: 409
Member

Hello,

I am so glad things are going along in a good positive way.

My son takes abilify (they did make him do a blood test though and keep taking it but not sure how much that matters).

I like what you said when you talked about "keeping an eye for mania". It really is the "trigger" we as spouses look for because that is usually the episodes that cause so much damage and hurt for US. But it's the depression that hurts them so much. Someone on another forum said how 'mania wants to destroy everything, depression makes you want to destroy yourself'.

"As Lollipop said on another thread today, healing from episodes takes real time"

Does actual physiological harm. I hope he feels better soon!

justhurt


02/16/2012 08:20 AM
wifeonbpexpress
wifeonbpexpress  
Posts: 4891
VIP Member

Great news, friend! I am so glad that there is hope for recovery from this and that the weight is lifted from him. Now he knows he's going to be ok!

02/16/2012 11:16 AM
sallyo
sallyoPosts: 3684
Group Leader

Excellent news!!! I'm happy to hear he's on the road to recovery.

Very interesting about how a depressive cycle really does affect us physically. That quote about depression and mania is so true, justhurt.


02/18/2012 05:05 PM
ilovemckenzi
Posts: 167
Member

Again, learning so much here. We had no idea that the mania and depressive cycles could cause some cognitive disruption. My poor husband. He has felt "dumb" for so long. Why hasn't our pdoc ever explained this stuff to us!

I feel like I've had my head in the sand. After all these years together - I just thought it was the way he was... ya know? I accepted it. It was ok.


02/18/2012 05:15 PM
justhurt
justhurt  
Posts: 409
Member

Don't beat yourself up over it. Now you know and can go from here! That is a gift. This place is a gift, dontcha think? Smile

Justhurt


02/18/2012 09:27 PM
grace72891
grace72891  
Posts: 301
Member

That is interesting. I wonder if the damage could be permanent if the depression lasts long enough. My husband's cognitive functioning is just horrible. Especially when it comes to memory. He has never shown improvement either. In fact, sometimes I think it has got worse over the years.

I have to deal with it all of the time, almost on a daily basis with big and small things. Yesterday he was talking to me about filing our taxes as joint this year instead of married but separate and saying he doesn't understand why I would not file joint with him last year. When I tried to remind him of how he was freaking out last year around that time concerning money he had no memory of it all. He said that all he could remember was trying to get me to file taxes joint and me saying no. He doesn't remember any other conversation or himself yelling at me and hitting our bedroom door and me finally telling him that if discussing money caused him to behave that way then I was not discussing money with him until he learned how to cope with the subject more effectively than he was. He completely denied all of that happening. It is very frustrating because there is nothing I can do to make him remember any of it but somehow I have to explain the side effects of his behavior to him which seems pointless because he has no idea what I am talking about and is appalled and offended that I would describe him as such a person who has behaved that way.

Post edited by: grace72891, at: 02/18/2012 09:33 PM


02/18/2012 09:46 PM
marriedtoit
marriedtoit  
Posts: 11201
Group Leader

My husband was told (by the neurologist, not just multiple psychiatrists) that the cognitive aftereffects of depression were not permanent.

We all know, however, that manic episodes cause brain lesions and over time, untreated mania can cause SIGNIFICANT cognitive impairment. Maybe he was just trying to "scare us straight" but a pdoc once said "Left untreated, I can predict you will be in long term care facility by the age of 60. You will be THAT impaired."

Grace, what you describe seems to me manic, not hypomanic, but I am just a layperson. Manic episodes will often produce HUGE memory gaps. Not unusual at all. Don't let him try and persuade your memory is wrong!!!!


02/18/2012 09:59 PM
grace72891
grace72891  
Posts: 301
Member

No I never do. That is why it gets to a point where we have to stop talking about it because it will turn into an argument because he and I both refuse to back down and the only way to avoid an argument is to change the subject. It usually goes, "Why would you say something like that about me? I would never do anything like that." "Okay. But you DID." "No, I didn't." "Yes you did." "No I didn't." "Yes you did." "No I didn't." over and over until it either escalates into a huge fight and me and the kids leaving the house because he's yelling and belligerent or i finally say, "Well, there is nothing I can do to force you to remember, and I KNOW what I experienced, so we might as well change the subject before it becomes a needless fight."

What you said about brain lesions is interesting. My husband's mother has brain lesions. I am wondering if she is hypomanic right now too or was last week. Because of the things I posted about what my husband told me. About her having that argument with that woman in her assisted living facility. He also said that she was constantly up walking and moving around, going around the facility talking to people and playing games, like Yahtzee, with them. He said she also taught herself how to crochet! He was really surprised and said he's never seen her that active or friendly before.

Post edited by: grace72891, at: 02/18/2012 10:00 PM

Post edited by: grace72891, at: 02/18/2012 10:29 PM

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