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08/24/2013 03:25 PM

I have a SSD question, I'm new....

ncm
 
Posts: 71
Member

I have Bipolar II and severe back injuries. I'm currently working, but this recent back injury has me questioning things. My future. Also, my bipolar gives me troubles at work sometimes. I thought if I lose this job or can't physically work anymore, I would apply for social security benefits.

Here's my question: I've been told when I retired that I would also receive part of my ex-husbands SS because we were married for 16 years.

If I went on SSD, would I be able to get the SS amount due to me from my ex-husbands social security. It would be really helpful to know that. I'd appreciate any advice anyone has.

Also, if I applied now, are there work restrictions, like you have to work so many years? I worked MANY years ago and then I stopped working to raise kids. Only the last 6 years have I worked.

Thanks,

NCM

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08/24/2013 03:30 PM
LostInCyberspace12
LostInCyberspace12  
Posts: 9944
Group Leader

How old are you if you don't mind me asking?

08/24/2013 03:32 PM
LostInCyberspace12
LostInCyberspace12  
Posts: 9944
Group Leader

If you are working now and earning SGA, they will not approve your claim for SSDI. Generally, the older you are, the more credits you need for SSDI.

Have you created an SSA online account yet? I would enter my earnings history into the benefits calculator and see if I was insured for SSDI and what the approx. benefit amounts would be.

Post edited by: LostInCyberspace12, at: 08/24/2013 03:42 PM


08/24/2013 03:43 PM
martireese
 
Posts: 1150
Member

Since you were married for 10 yrs, there are benefits you "may" be able to draw from him if the criteria is meet. That info is below. Also, you "may" not have enough credits to draw SSDI. If you don't have enough credits, you "might" qualify for SSI, but there are income and resource guidelines for that as well as being found disabled.

Being found disabled means you aren't able to work based on your medical records and work history, age, etc. Having a diagnosis and history of treatment, etc doesn't not mean you're disabled.

Qualifying for divorced spouse benefits-

http://ssa-custhelp.ssa.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/299/kw/ divorced%20disabled%20spouse


08/24/2013 03:51 PM
LostInCyberspace12
LostInCyberspace12  
Posts: 9944
Group Leader

I know my own mother is retired and her SSR is a combination from her own earning's and from my deceased stepdad's earnings to give her the max amount. She was never disabled. She accepted early retirement at age 62. She was married to this man for over 10 years and she never remarried.

08/24/2013 04:22 PM
martireese
 
Posts: 1150
Member

ncm,

If you were able to draw SSDI on your own record, that would have nothing to do with your ex's ss retirement.

Lost, the most a spouse or divorced spouse can get is 50%when the worker reaches full retirement age. So the combination allow your mom to get more.


08/25/2013 03:36 PM
ncm
 
Posts: 71
Member

Thank you all. To answer one of the questions, I am 50 years old and just don't know how long this ol' back is going to last. I'm going to the SS site and check out that calculator. Thanks for all the support!!

08/25/2013 04:33 PM
LostInCyberspace12
LostInCyberspace12  
Posts: 9944
Group Leader

If you are insured for SSDI ncm and decide to apply, you must stop working. Can you survive financially in the meantime while you are trying to get your claim approved? My SSDI is over $2100/month. Had I been able to keep working until my early retirement age (62), my early retirement amount would have been about $300 less. If you stay on SSDI until FRA (full retirement age - 67), the SSDI amount will convert to retirement. Plus, you can get medical insurance (medicare) 29 months after SSDI EOD or after 24 months of SSDI payments.

Both SSDI and SSI are for people who are unable to work due to some medical condition. The monthly benefit for SSDI (alone) is typically more than what you get for SSI. Some people qualify for both, but if you qualify for SSDI alone, that is the best.

For SSI, you have to be basically too sick to work and poor. You can get SSI even if you have never worked a day in your life.

For SSDI, you have to be basically too sick to work and have worked in the past long enough to be insured for SSDI. SSDI is basically long-term disability insurance that you pay for when you are working but you have to at least work long enough to be insured to be eligible.

Go to the SSA website and create an account and look at your earnings record. It will give you an idea

https://secure.ssa.gov/RIL/SiView.do

Next, go here (online calculator) and enter your info. from your earnings record and it will tell you if you are insured for SSDI and approx. what your monthly benefit will be.

http://www.ssa.gov/retire2/AnypiaApplet.html

Ofc, you can always call SS and they can tell you if you are insured. I posted the picture earlier to show the credits needed for SSDI. I think I was 47 or 48 when I applied. I was approved for panic, anxiety, and depression. I was in the same boat as yourself. I was trying to make it to early retirement but I just got really sick and could not continue working any longer. Hopefully, you have been seeing your doctor regularly while you have been struggling with the bipolar while trying to work. Good luck to you!

Post edited by: LostInCyberspace12, at: 08/25/2013 08:37 PM


08/25/2013 04:50 PM
LostInCyberspace12
LostInCyberspace12  
Posts: 9944
Group Leader

You might also check and see if you have things like STD and LTD available to you through your employer. I received these things while I applied for for SSDI so the financial strain on me was not as bad as it is on some while they try to get their SSDI claims approved. I also had some savings but I did not have to use them. SSDI can take a long time so you must plan very carefully before you decide to apply. Work as long as you are able tho and keep seeing your doctor regularly and having your medical condition documented. I wanted to work to early retirement age but I just could not make it due to the severe nature of my illness.

Post edited by: LostInCyberspace12, at: 08/25/2013 07:09 PM

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