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10/19/2009 05:28 AM

Bone Spurs and Arthritis

kvnj
kvnj  
Posts: 3907
Group Leader

What Should You Do About Bone Spurs?

Bone spurs -- also called osteophytes -- are benign, bony bumps that usually form on the joints. Most are harmless and never detected. But if they limit your movement or cause pain, treatment is available. Here's what you should know.

To some extent, bone spurs are just a normal part of aging; your body may produce them to compensate for gradual bone loss that occurs over time. Bone spurs may also be a result of arthritis or other bone diseases. As cartilage in the joints wears away in arthritis patients, bones begin to rub directly against each other and bone spurs develop. These bumps may protrude into surrounding tendons or break off and float in the space within joints, causing swelling or interfering with range of motion.

In the spine, bone spurs may lead to stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal) and exert pressure on the nerves, causing muscle weakness, tingling, loss of coordination, or radiating pain in the buttocks, thighs, or shoulders. Bone spurs in the spine's cervical region can push into the throat, making it difficult to swallow or breathe. Symptoms like these may indicate diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), a condition characterized by multiple bone spurs and ossified ligaments, usually in the spine (though DISH can affect other areas of the body).

If you are experiencing symptoms, your doctor will examine you and possibly order x-rays or other imaging tests. The best way to treat a bone spur is by addressing the underlying cause. In addition to arthritis and other medical conditions like DISH, excess weight, bad posture, old athletic injuries, or even shoes that don't fit well may be to blame.

Conservative therapy usually involves rest, icing, stretching, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Also, even though your symptoms may seem to worsen with movement, targeted physical therapy exercises can restore range of motion in the joints and promote good posture (which reduces pressure on nerves). For temporary relief of serious pain, you may be given cortisone shots.

Surgical removal is an option for more severe symptoms, particularly if you already require surgery for arthritis. Some people choose to have bone spurs taken out for cosmetic reasons, especially when the hands are affected. Removal can be performed through open or laparoscopic procedures.

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Just an FYI Wink

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11/21/2009 06:30 PM
bearlie
bearlie  
Posts: 1517
VIP Member

I had a bone spur on my wrist - it was very small and pointy and i rubbed it and the point just disappeared. Didn't hurt, didn't cause any new problems - was just really weird.

Thanks for the article. Smile


04/26/2012 03:16 AM
gettingoldsucks
gettingoldsucks  
Posts: 3428
Senior Member

Saw an ENT doc yesterday. The roof mouth sore causing me so much grief for the past 2 years is a large overgrowth of bone down the middle with 2 bone spurs that keep ulcering. I guess I am firing my Oral surgeon and getting a new one. ENT wasn't sure of the cause but thinks the fact that I have arthritis in jaws may be it.

Treatment - a waxy medicine used for 5 days that might dissolve them. If another ulcer appears it will be biopsied. If they don't dissolve, surgery to shave them down is needed. Because of long term ulcers in the mouth, oral caner risk rises. He said in 25 years, he has had maybe 20 patients with oral bone spurs and they all only lasted a couple weeks to a few months never 2 years. Says i will probably be his first patient who needs the surgery.

Now he says bone spurs are mostly from lack of calcium and to increase calcium intake. I told him with always low VIT D that is a problem and I do take both. VIT D is needed to help the body absorb Calcium. He also suggested a hand specialist for the tendonitis in my palm. Says it's a bone spur over the inside knuckle.


04/26/2012 02:30 PM
Herblady
Herblady  
Posts: 939
Member

Don't ya just hate bone spurs?? I call them barnicals....LOL I had several removed in my c-sping surg....

08/22/2012 08:03 AM
AmyLouLou
AmyLouLou  
Posts: 184
Member

I have a bone spur on my left heel. It hurts occasionally. Barnacles...I like that name Smile

08/22/2012 04:09 PM
MartyC
 
Posts: 181
Member

I also had a barnacle on my left heal and have two in my neck. I can't feel the ones in my neck but the heal spur sometimes hurts.

My foot doctor did not want to remove it since I have had the same neuroma removed twice in my foot and it is back again. I am just like a star fish!! She said that the spur would more than likely come back as well.

Weird huh??


08/22/2012 04:28 PM
Cata
Cata  
Posts: 2061
Group Leader

When they took my knees out in my knee replacements, they had spurs and other bone formations all over. Doc said it was one of the worse knees he had ever since and he has done thousands of them.

I have bone spurs and stenosis in my spine. I think the spurs are one of the reasons why my back hurts so much.

Donna, those spurs in the roof of mouth sound so painful! It sucks it took you this 2 yrs of misery to finally know what they were...


08/22/2012 05:04 PM
tonyaraz
tonyaraz  
Posts: 738
Member

Wow what is it with bone spurs? Darn doctors! I like barnicals too, they are a parasite. Donna I have never heard of them in the mouth, I can't image the pain that would cause. ouch!!!! I hope there is something they can do for you.

08/22/2012 05:17 PM
claphappy
claphappy  
Posts: 4021
Group Leader

This summer I had my first MRI of my ankle and considered surgery (until the rash). It also showed a bone spur on my right foot. I was ticked the orthopedist Surgeon didn't say some thing about it. It was the RN at the PCP's that told me about it. If I'm going to have surgery It might as well get everything right?

Donna It does sound painful to have one in the mouth. Hugs and prayers


09/12/2012 01:15 AM
cella
cella  
Posts: 997
Member

Very interesting and informative article

Thanks Karen

I have spinal stenosis and have bone spurs in the cervical spine.

I have had treatment for my neck and lumbar spine, trying desperately to avoid surgery, will continue with physical therapy and meds for now. Sure hope my neck and spinal pain will lessen.

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