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05/01/2009 10:38 AM

Tomatoes and Inflammation..

kvnj
kvnj  
Posts: 3906
Group Leader

Here's an interesting article on Tomatoes and their relation to inflammation in the body..

Processing tomatoes may inhibit inflammation

04-30-09

Tomato products may protect against inflammation. Such were the findings from a recent multi-center, randomized, controlled trial on the effects of processed tomatoes on vasodilatation and C-reactive protein in overweight and obese men and women, presented by Rose Giordano at the Experimental Biology meeting held in New Orleans, La.

An immerging body of research suggests that inflammation may be a significant component in the development of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, periodontal disease, rheumatoid arthritis, neurological degenerative disorders, and inflammatory bowel disorders. There is growing interest in the role that diet may play in reducing inflammation in order to protect against such chronic diseases.

The regular consumption of tomato products has been consistently associated with a lower risk of several types of cancer and coronary heart disease. Using data from adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999 to 2004), researchers recently found that consumption of processed tomatoes was associated with significantly lower serum C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein is a recognized biomarker of inflammation.

Scientists are intrigued with the array of nutrients such as vitamins A and C, fiber, potassium, beta-carotene, and lycopene that appear to work together in unison to provide health benefits. Particular interest has surrounded lycopene, a powerful antioxidant found abundantly in processed tomato products.

Tomatoes, the second most popular vegetable in the country, represent an excellent opportunity to ward off chronic disease. Since processed tomato products are economical and easily adaptable to a variety of cultural diets, the health benefits warrant further investigation.

Given the potential for tomato products to protect against chronic disease, researchers from the University of California, Davis, National Center for Food Safety & Technology in Illinois, and Penn State University investigated the effects of processed tomato products on vasodilatation (another target for lowering disease through dietary strategies) and C-reactive protein on overweight and obese men and women.

Within the diets of 56 free-living individuals participating in the study, processed tomato products or non-tomato products were matched in calories, sodium, and sugar content. All of the test subjects consumed a low-tomato diet for three weeks followed by either a six week high-tomato diet or low-tomato diet.

At six weeks, the subjects were assessed as to the response of tomato after eating a high-fat meal. Compared with the low-tomato group, the high-tomato group experienced a C-reactive protein level that was lower in response to the high-fat meal. High-tomato intake was also associated with increased mean vessel diameter, but flow mediated vasodilatation was not different, possibly related to the BMI of subjects.

The researchers concluded that processed tomatoes provide a protective role on inflammation, but increasing adiposity may negate the benefits of the high-tomato diet on endothelial function.

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05/02/2009 07:05 AM
Cyrusray
 
Posts: 746
Member

NO one eats more tomatoes than I do.....I eat frest vine ripened

tomatoes ALLLL summer, sometimes just for a meal! I should be WELL>>>> I shall continue....maybe bathe in them....


05/15/2009 07:32 AM
tishylu
Posts: 35
Member

When my RA was initially diagnosed, I joined the Yahoo group and learned that often, RA reactions are triggered by certain foods, due to a leaky gut (as it turned out, I had had a bout with giardia that had gone undiagnosed for over a year despite several visits to the MD, who told me it was my stress level. I wish I could shoot the guy, legally.)At any rate, I found that tomatoes were one of the key foods that caused an inflammatory reaction. For me, tomatoes and all nightshade veggies (bell peppers) had to be avoided, along with eggs, pork, (any kind of pork...bacon, pork chops, ham...go figure), POPCORN (but not corn...must be the fiber), and others I do not remember now. Apparently it has to do with the digested components of the food and if you have a leaky gut, what elements leak thru and get into your blood system. If you have not read up on Leaky Gut Syndrome, you should do so....I now know, since having a colonoscopy, that the giardia had left all sorts of scar tissue. Ironically, I killed off the giardia when I went on a 4-day long garlic treatment, eating 3 cloves a day of raw garlic. But the damage that was done could not be healed, so I now have to take lots of probiotics every day. My Dr. said that as we get older, the beneficial bacteria in the gut get to be less and less, killed off over time by the antibiotics we have taken, etc. Seems that the public is just becoming aware - now they sell Activia, Dan Active, GoodBelly, and a host of other probiotic-enhanced yogurts and such. I take those things every day and also eat yogurt, and also supplement with a probiotic tablet. Side note...I wear gas permeable hard contacts. My eyes had been getting drier over the past few years. Since I started taking probiotics, the eyes are not as dry (I can get the contacts out more easily). If I miss a day of taking my probiotics, my eyes tell me that night when I go to take out the contacts!! Amazing stuff, the body!Cheerful

05/15/2009 08:06 AM
kvnj
kvnj  
Posts: 3906
Group Leader

Tishylu,

Thanks for the excellent information! Im not sure if I had leaky gut along the way, but 6 yrs ago was diagnosed with parvovirus and here I am today. Two years ago, 1 yr before getting diagnosed with RA, I had diverticulitis and my intestines perforated so I guess you couldn't leak much more than that. Luckily Im still alive to talk about it. When I was on massive doses of antibiotics (4500 mg a day) I started taked probiotics & acidophilus etc.. to combat all the problems they caused.

Im glad that you've found something to make you feel better, and that it was a relatively simple thing.

I wish there was some definitive study about foods and RA and that the powers that be would come up with an RA diet. Its all so unknown and speculative. Answers would be nice!

Thanks again for the info!

karen


05/15/2009 08:18 AM
Cyrusray
 
Posts: 746
Member

I thought parvo was for dogs??????

05/15/2009 08:19 AM
tishylu
Posts: 35
Member

yep - there it is - the leaky gut connection. For some reason, most rheumatologists seem to ignore or dismiss that. The literature about arthritis also seems to ignore that for the most part, or only gives the idea a glancing mention. I firmly believe that this was the trigger of my RA, seems to have triggered your RA...and more needs to be done to find a way to plug the leaks! Probiotics help but do not stop the leaks entirely.

05/15/2009 09:03 AM
kvnj
kvnj  
Posts: 3906
Group Leader

Kathy, people get Parvo too. In kids, they call it "Fifths disease"... it looks like the kid got slapped in the face, may have a little rash on arms, and a fever too. In kids it goes away, and for some reason when adults get it its worse. Pregnant women can get seriously ill and I believe cause damage to or lose their babies. Who'd have thought huh

01/07/2012 08:11 PM
heager1
heager1Posts: 298
Member

well I believe in the end august my step daughter had fifth disease she was taken to the Er and then to her regular dr for a follow up which she had the slapped face looking rash and on her chest she had the rash also. she missed a few days of school. during this time I was very sick and laid on the couch and felt like I was dying and never before have I ever felt like this. so for the last 4 months I have had joint pain. I have been researching this virus to see if this is what I have because honestly I don't think I have RA. these two illnesses mimic each other and parvo can last for months. I recently went back to a reg. dr to see about further testing. let me know what you guys know about parvo????
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