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07/19/2012 06:14 PM

Why is the pain worse at night

Stormy68
 
Posts: 101
Member

How come I can tolerate the pain during the day but at night the pain keeps me awake? I now think it has moved to my knees my left knee has hardly any cartridge and my right is ok since a previous surgery now I roll around in the bed at night because my face hurts and now my knees are killing me. I'm so tired during the day Im falling asleep in meetings. I was hurting so bad on Tuesday that I tried to call in sick and my boss gave me they guilt trip that I went into work with my face swollen and my left eye swollen.

I'm getting tile in the bedrooms and trying to get rid of 15 years of clutter and I feel like my body is letting me down. I get tired so fast and get soaking wet in minutes. I'm still on plavix because of the TIA so I just bump myself and I'm covered in bruises I look like someone has beaten me.

I'm just so tired I feel like I could collapse but I can't sleep comfortable.

Shari

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07/19/2012 11:46 PM
Barcon
 
Posts: 319
Member

Hey Storm,

I think it get worse because of all the activity that is endured during the day, that also goes into those sleepless nights! So sorry you are feeling so bad!

Barb


07/20/2012 01:01 AM
maddiesgram
maddiesgram  
Posts: 2330
Senior Member

Hi Shari,

You sound so tired and right now it's the middle of the night and my hope is that you're getting some good restorative sleep. Barb was right that for many of us, and for me for sure, activity causes our pain to get worse and worse and when we want to just sleep is unfortunately when the pain is highest, making sleep so hard to come by. I don't know what you do to try to get sleep, but do all you can to make the environment just for rest. Have you taken anything to help you sleep? Because if our activity causes our pain to increase but good sleep can bring it back down a bit, getting that sleep will help you some. I take Ambien, but have also taken melatonin with it as my pain doctor directed or amitriptyline with it as he suggested. It's always seemed to me that my pain doctor was just as interested in me getting good sleep as he was getting the pain controlled, then I realized how important he thinks the sleep is in order to control the pain, so it's not a seperate issue to him. Or to me now. I do hope you can find ways to better manage both your pain and your sleeping. I sure feel bad for you trying to work and feeling so terrible.

Some people think that their pain is worse at night due to having less distractions, but my distractions are pretty much the same always, so I know that's not a factor for me. I hope you can find a way that works best for you to get the sleep and relief from pain that you need. Please let us know if you try something new and it helps!

gail


07/20/2012 08:30 AM
thiamarie
thiamarie  
Posts: 119
Member

Hi Shari:

My PT explained it to me like this.. We all have a certain threshold that our bodies can take, we simply have to figure out what the threshold is for each of us. After a bad night's rest, or stress, or a busy day, or using our CRPS limbs more, our ability to withstand pain is less. So we have to determine what we can handle and learn to pace our lives accordingly.

I use aromatherapy (lavender, chamomile,or euchalyptus oils) and l-tryptophan to help me relax when I cannot go to sleep. I hope you feel better today!

Sincerely, Thiamarie


07/20/2012 09:10 AM
Fletch2ya
Fletch2ya  
Posts: 3183
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I'm an Advocate

HI.... I have often wondered why we feel more pain at night than we do during the day.... my thought about this is... we have less to keep our thoughts away from the pain, less to distract us, also... we are more tired, so we have less ability to fight off the pain with our natural defenses. I find that this is true with some other problems that I have.... like my ringing in my ears..... But I do agree that the pain seems to be worse at night than during the day...... not that it really is.... but that it just seems to be.....

Craig


07/20/2012 09:23 AM
Stormy68
 
Posts: 101
Member

That's my biggest problem is I push myself through the pain during the day and I think that is why i can't sleep at night. I know there are times my body is telling me to slow down you need to stop

And I just keep going. It's so hard for me to slow down because I feel like a failure when I can't get the task done, I know now that I have to listen to my body or I'm going to pay the price at night.

Ls


07/20/2012 09:51 AM
Fletch2ya
Fletch2ya  
Posts: 3183
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HI....Stormy.... I understand that exactly...I do the same thing... I always over do any project that I have .... and pay dearly for it later....

I have always been this way though... like when I use to work out... IF I did not workout till I was about half dead, I did not do enough... I also felt like I failed....

Craig


07/20/2012 12:00 PM
footinmouth
Posts: 282
Member

Spot on Craig. That's my theory as well. We have to spend so much brain power trying to keep the pain at bay that, at some point, we become too mentally exhausted to keep it up. That's when the pain filters through (usually in the evenings).

During the day I try to keep things going as much as possible to overload myself and similarly, often pay for it later. Even when I go for a walk with my crutches, the more pain there is the harder and faster I walk. It's the complete opposite of what I should do but it's how I force the pain away.

I find that I have to plan my energy levels during the day. If I know that I'm going to be doing something in the evening, I have to make sure that I take it easy during the day.

fim


07/20/2012 12:47 PM
cfthb
cfthb  
Posts: 873
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

Hi -

I've never researched the topic of why RSD pain is so much worse at night, but I'm going to look into it. Before I was diagnosed, there's no doubt at all that my pain was far worse at night - usually 12-2am - than any time during the day. It wasn't a little difference either. If I were at a 5-6 during the day, I'd be at a 8-9 in the middle of the night.

The quality of the pain changed, too - at night, it had much more of the hot, searing, lancinating nerve pain quality than it ever did during the day. For me, I don't believe it was a matter of being less distracted at night or something like that; it really felt like a different type of pain.

I'm going to look into this and let y'all know if I find anything interesting.

Howard


07/20/2012 01:03 PM
Fletch2ya
Fletch2ya  
Posts: 3183
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

HI.... Howard... I don't really think it is that my pain changed... it might have a little just because of me being tired, and less able to fight it.... but I still feel from my experience it was the distractions of the day, that kept the pain level down... Which I think acts almost like a pain med in itself..... Because it blocks it from the brain...

Like I said in the other post, ear doctors like to use the same analogy when describing ringing in a persons ear, that they don't hear the ringing during the day so much because of the other noises, an other things going on during the day. But once they decide to go to sleep, the ringing in there ears becomes a real problem. Because it becomes really loud... That is why "white" noise was developed to mask the ringing ....

to act as a distraction for the brain ..

Anyway...that is just my opinion........

Craig

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