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03/24/2008 10:16 AM

treatment

thomasann
thomasann  
Posts: 681
Member

Does anyone know of a treatment for raynaud's. I heard that Niacin may help. My doctors says there is no treatment for it.
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03/24/2008 04:48 PM
cp1127
 
Posts: 30
Member

I don't know about niacin for Raynaud's. Maybe if you go to WebMD or the Mayo Clinic website you can find out if it works. I take blood pressure meds for mine. They say we should avoid stress because it makes the blood vessels contract and get smaller. How can you not have stress in your life? I think caffeine is not good either, or smoking. Just try to stay out of air conditioning or really cold weather, or use hand warmers that you can buy at sporting goods stores. I know how painful it can be. Do you have an underlying condition that causes the Raynaud's?

Cathy


03/29/2008 09:37 AM
thomasann
thomasann  
Posts: 681
Member

I am assuming fibromyalgia or degenerative disc disease are my underlying conditions, but I really think the raynaulds came first.

04/30/2008 09:24 AM
psk
psk  
Posts: 272
Member

I am on norvasc, a blood pressure med, specifically for reynaulds, but I have lupus and RA as my underlying conditions.

05/19/2008 12:39 PM
Snowball

Hello! I'm into looking for treatments for Raynaud's, too (other than ProCardia!). I'm taking a baby aspirin daily per my rheumatologist and try to stay warm--easier said than done sometimes. I find the very rude and insensitive comments from some people to be especially upsetting--that and the STARES because I have on gloves and earmuffs most of the time. I wonder if these same rude folks also make fun of crippled children and folks in wheel chairs!!! I try every day to put my spiritual life in the forefront with prayer as treatment along with eating healthy, exercising daily, trying to get enough sleep and trying not to be stressed about anything (which is hard for me). I've also heard that a lack of magnesium may be a cause of Raynaud's but I don't think they will ever know what causes it--and there isn't any real treatment and it is chronic. I don't think autoimmune issues get much research funding. Someone told me this past weekend that having vaccines between like the 50's-60's could cause Raynaud's. Do you know how many shots I've had in my life??? Even been through the entire rabies series. I don't think even moving to a HOT climate helps those of us with Raynaud's because I trigger when I walk inside air conditioned stores even if it is 90 degrees outside! Ever cold--Snowball

Post edited by: Snowball, at: 05/19/2008 14:42


05/19/2008 12:44 PM
thomasann
thomasann  
Posts: 681
Member

I already take BP meds and it hasn't helped. I keep my hot water bottle and heating pad nearby. Even in the summer months I cannot seems to keep my hands and feet warm. The feet are the worse! People give me strange looks when I wear sandals because at times they look almost black instead of purple! I tired the Niacin, but nothing. I am really beginning to believe this is something we have to live with.Tami

05/20/2008 11:01 AM
Snowball

Tami, did you see the Winter/Spring 2008 COLD CUTS issue and the article SUCCESS WITH NIACIN? I'll reproduce it here for your convenience...

Thomas from Minnesota tells us he's had great success taking Niaci. He's had Raynaud's from an early age, and as an avid ice skater, he suffered badly from frozen fingers and toes. His condition got worse over the years and now at age 70, the simpest activities, such as holding a gas nozzle, can set off an attack.

Thomas found relief in taking Niacin--250 mg. twice a day. Within a few days on the supplement he was able to go outside and shovel snow, drive, and do what most people can do without gloves. For him, he considers Niacin a magic cure. But he cautions fellow frosties to consult their doctors as Niacin can cause other problems with the metabolism. And, while it may not work for everyone, he wanted to share his experience in hopes of helping other suffers.

Editor's Note: Niacin, also known as vitamin B-3, can help the blood vessels dilate, increasing blood flow to the skin. But supplements don't work for everyone, and as Thomas notes, please check with your doctor before initiating any new herbal or vitamin treatments, as they may interact with other medications or have or have unexpected dangerous side effects.

DISCLAIMER: The Raynaud's Association does not endorse the drugs, treatments or products reported in this newsletter. Each patient's needs and experiences may vary. Member tips and product reviews are not clinially-based reports. So please review all treatment options with your doctor and use caution in exploring new products.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Ever cold--Snowball

Post edited by: Snowball, at: 05/20/2008 13:03

Post edited by: Snowball, at: 05/20/2008 13:03

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