MDJunction - People Helping People
 
Ask a Question
03/07/2010 08:51 AM

Recently discovered my husband has prostate cancer

Positive2
 
Posts: 2
Member



Post edited by: Positive2, at: 06/02/2010 05:40 AM
Reply

03/07/2010 07:54 PM
tony04
tony04  
Posts: 118
Member

I'm 60 yr old Australian recently diagnosed 2DAYS AGO with prostate cancer PSA 9 Gleason 7 due to have surgery in 2 wks scared stiff . You and your husband have my full understanding it is a dreadful time as i said I'm scared so much but all i try to do it tell myself it is contained to the prostate and everything will be all right. Here in Australia we have just had one of our famous sporting men diagnosed he was 57yrs old any way he had surgery and was very successful cancer free so i look at this type of story to gain HOPE.My preys are with you both be like me and keep saying WE WILL BEET THIS.Regards Tony.

03/08/2010 08:13 AM
srciaran
srciaran  
Posts: 283
Member

Hi Positive and Tony,

Welcome to this group. There are lots of us here who have undergone treatments of various kinds, and will be glad to share details. Me, I had my radical prostatectomy last May, and I am doing well, and cancer free, it seems. Some things to keep in mind: PC is a very slow-growing cancer, and unless your numbers are dire, you needn't rush into any treatment. Urologists will often try to rush patients into surgery, but you have time to learn more about it and examine your treatment options. Radiation has a comparable cure rate to surgery, so it doesn't hurt to get a second opinion from a radiation oncologist. Also, make sure your doctor has significant experience. It has been shown that more experienced surgeons/oncologists provide significantly better outcomes. And on the topic of support, the most important thing a spouse can do is not try to rush her man into a decision. It's a process, and there is much trepidation regarding issues of incontinence, impotence, and mortality that every man in this situation struggles with. Be patient and remember that there is time to get through this, that it's his decision, and you are not going to lose him to this disease if you caught it early enough (and in both cases, it sounds like you did).


03/08/2010 10:49 AM
Coloradodillard
Posts: 105
Member

Positive - Good advice from Srciaran. The PC is slow growing and you have time to do a lot of research and make the best decision for your situation. I was diagnosed last March at age 60 with PC. My wife is also several years younger than me and we took time to decide what was best for us. I chose a radical prostatectomy using the Da Vinci Robot in late June of last year. The surgery went well and so far I am cancer free. I still have to wear a pad daily for incontinence. I am able to achieve an erection with the aid of Viagra, but our sex life has definitely changed. I would recommend doing lots of research and also a book titled “Dr. Patrick Walsh's Guide to Surviving Prostrate Cancer”. My Uro recommended the book and my wife and I both read this book shortly after my diagnosis. I found it very helpful in understanding what to expect and also what questions to ask for my research. In addition, another PC survivor on this site recommended a book called “Saving Your Sex Life, A Guide For Men With Prostate Cancer" by John P. Mulhall MD. I found it very helpful and wish I had read it prior to my surgery. Both are inexpensive and can be found at Amazon. Good luck with your decision and don't rush.

03/13/2010 06:05 AM
Pyroman
Pyroman  
Posts: 125
Member

I would agree with everyone. I was 53 and had the Davinci this past August, and also as of last PSA show to be cancer free. My gleason was 3+4=7, anad had a low PSA of .7, however in a year had doubled from the last visit. Colorado and Srciaran both have good advise.

I attempted a support group at the Cancer Society, however in my area, apparently men don't want to talk about it.

I recently read a book "Cancer is a Four-Letter Word: A Pilgrimage into the Emotional, Sexual, and Spiritual Aspects of Prostate Cancer" by Larry Kreps. In reading it, I could have put my name in the place of his. I wish I had read it prior to the surgery. It is a very short book. In fact, he is speaking today in my area, and am going to go listen to him.

I also had a friend that had the same surgery about 2 years before me, and was able to talk to him. Prior to my diagnosis, I did not even realize he ahd the surgery.

From talking to him, and some other people, it is obvious that people heal at different rates, so don't be disapointed if you don't heal as quick. I have healed very quickly in the continence area, but am going slow in the impotence area.

Hang in there and have your husband do what is best for him and just be supportive.


03/14/2010 03:53 PM
kutztown76
Posts: 11
New Member

I just wanted to say "thank you" to everyone in these forums. I just joined the group earlier today and have already received some encouraging feedback. Reading the experiences and opinions of folks in the same boat as me is huge. And knowing that it's OK to take the time to understand and digest everything is reassuring. I've got a 3+3=6 reading with a 4.7 PSA. Laproscopy surgery has some appeal (not necessarily the robotic variety) and I'm curious to hear from anyone who has gone this route. Thanks.

03/14/2010 04:53 PM
hollywoodmark
hollywoodmarkPosts: 867
Member

Glad you're getting some info and insight from the group, K76. I'm curious about your interest in laparascopic surgery but not robotic-assisted. How come?

03/15/2010 02:25 PM
kutztown76
Posts: 11
New Member

It's just that I'm curious about the non-robotic variety in the event anyone has had it done. It may sound old fashioned but I wonder if a "human feel" may have some advantages over the robotic variety. It's also based somewhat on the side effects of robotic not being as good vs. open surgery. But I also understand that those results may not be based on solid studies. In many ways it's just that the more I read the better I feel from the standpoint of gaining knowledge but the more I read the more questions pop into my mind. It's just that it's all a bit overwhelming and the more I think I'm learning the more anxious it's making me.

03/15/2010 03:55 PM
trowhill
trowhill  
Posts: 47
Member

I have had the robotic surgery and have had excellent results.no incontinence no after surgery pain didn't even need meds. I have had the opportunity to play with the Davinci. it is amazing piece of equipment. the intuitive company came to our support group mtg and let us play with it. $1.5 million machine it has a 1080i High def camera that it uses so that the surgeon can actually have a better 3d view of all the plumbing down there and is able to possible save the nerves. he or she has a better view of the prostate and surrounding area. most all surgeons to my knowledge have done laprascopic prostatectamy's before using the davinci robot, they all now prefer the davinci as it can be more accurate.the mechanical wrist of the machine has more articulation than the human hand. if you check out the intuitive website there is a great video there to watch if you still are curious about it.good luck in making your decision it is hard but you'll know when you've made your choice that it's right for you.just keep in mind what quality of life would like after your treatment

03/15/2010 09:18 PM
kutztown76
Posts: 11
New Member

Thanks for the in-depth response. It's responses like yours that I'm finding to be most helpful. I'm going to take a look at the Da Vinci as you suggest. The quality of life issue is so huge to me. I'm having difficulty getting my head around what will be most important to me down the road. Sex? Incontinence? Being cancer free? All tough questions. But when it's all said and done, being rid of the cancer seems to trump the other two. That's my sense now but since there's no way of knowing the eventual outcome in advance of the treatment and if I've got trouble with either of the other two after the surgery I don't know how I'd handle it. All the "what if's" make this stressful.
Reply

Share this discussion with your friends:
<< Start < Prev 1 Next > End >>


Disclaimer: The information provided in MDJunction is not a replacement for medical diagnosis, treatment, or professional medical advice.
In case of EMERGENCY call 911 or 1.800.273.TALK (8255) to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Read more.
Contact Us | About Us
Copyright (c) 2006-2014 MDJunction.com All Rights Reserved