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08/25/2010 06:58 AM

Just diagnosed - surgery or radiation therapy?

peppersdad
 
Posts: 3
New Member

Hi all, thanks in advance for your input and support. I was recently diagnosed via biopsy, Gleason 3 +3 with a PSA of 0.5, last years check was fine. two cancer spots, left side and right, each 2% cancer cells. I'm 54, diabetic (moderate control) and about 30 lbs overweight with increasing ED the last few months. I've come to terms that worsening ED is highly probable no matter what treatment approach I take. The anectodal reports from friends who know of other prostate survivors is about 50/50 split between surgery and radio, with those over 70 almost 100% surgery. Question - for those also in their early 50's, what factors led to your decision for one treatment over another? thanks....Dave
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08/25/2010 07:14 AM
hollywoodmark
hollywoodmarkPosts: 867
Member

Welcome, Dave. I'll let some of our younger members answer your question, but I have a couple for YOU. What led to your biopsy--just one increased PSA reading? Or did you suspect that your ED symptoms are somehow linked to PC? Or maybe, like me, you have a family history of early-onset PC? In any case, it's great that you know so soon. You have lots of time to ponder your options.

08/25/2010 09:39 AM
peppersdad
 
Posts: 3
New Member

Mark, routine physical and the digital exam suggested one side of the prostate was a firmer than normal. Yes, I'm very fortunate to have an early diagnosis !

- dave


08/25/2010 05:03 PM
Pyroman
Pyroman  
Posts: 125
Member

I was 53 when diagnosed with PC. To answer your question, I had mine removed in about 2 1/2 months after being dianosed just for the peace of mind of not having the cancer inside my body.

Just make sure you and your significant other make the decision that you can both live with.


08/26/2010 03:29 PM
trowhill
trowhill  
Posts: 47
Member

I'm 52 diagnosed May 09 during my discussions with the urologist and radiologist i was informed that if I had radiation therapy and it came back i would not be a candidate for surgery so i opted for the surgery and had the prostate removed. it was a good choice for me I had no incontinence and my ED is slim to none it has improved greatly in the last few months.

09/02/2010 11:31 AM
Jay06
 
Posts: 2
New Member

Surgery is the best way to go.

09/02/2010 06:18 PM
MsSnick24
MsSnick24  
Posts: 389
Group Leader

Dave, I highly recommend this book: "Dr. Patrick Walsh's Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer, Second Edition." He provides several matrices to review 'what if' options and descriptions of who is a likely candidate for what procedure.

Some tips gleaned from our research:

Gleason score of 6 provides more treatment options than a higher score would indicate.

Prostate cancer is very individual, each person's specific circumstance is unique and therefore, treatment choices are unique and should be tailored to the individual as well.

Prostatectomy is considered the gold standard in treatment, and other methods try to attain the same success rate.

Your overall health condition and specific PCa scores need to be considered when determining which course of action to take.

One book said that after you are done researching, and make your decision, then allow that burden to fall off your shoulders, and focus forward, on recovery and the future.

Second or third opinion highly recommended, including consulting (or interviewing) a urologist (surgeon) as well as a radiation oncologist to get a direct consult from the specialists in two of the major forms of treatment.

We found a great deal of information, and comfort, from researching several different books and internet resources. Some were easy to recognize as being radical, and most offered the same information, just packaged differently, which makes it easier for different folks to relate to. Everything we researched on our own was validated by our doctor consultations, which was rewarding as well.

In our family, I presented the information factually, and left the decision process to my husband. It's his prostate, he had to be fully in charge of making the final decision. Honestly tho, after the research, the course of action for us seemed quite clear, but in our case, the Gleason score was higher (one 8, one 7, one 6), (more agressive) and that indicated a more agressive treatment should be pursued.

We were very glad to have the decision made, and now are counting down to the surgery date of September 22. The surgery will be performed open rather than daVinci, again, because of the Gleason 8. Our doc does both, but tailored his approach to the data presented specifically in my husband's case.

If you are interested, there are other books I could recommend, and some that I wouldn't recommend.

I wish you the best in making your decision and hope this information has been helpful.

Post edited by: MsSnick24, at: 09/02/2010 06:40 PM


09/06/2010 10:26 AM
Dack
 
Posts: 32
New Member

Dave, I'm 61 and diagnosed with T2a prostaste cancer late 2009. Found PSA of 71 from routine physical. Biopsy showed 3+3=6. After discussing with radiologist, oncologist and urologist, I was informed that surgery would only be 42% successful with my factors, so I opted for hormone injections and radiation. I had little or no side effects during the 8 week radiation treatment. I had some other factors, non related to the cancer as I lost my job about 7 months prior so I had that to deal with also. My last radiation treatment was in early May and also stopped hormone injection then also. I was supposed to go back to oncologist this month but cancelled as I am still unemployed and had to cancel Cobra in July when subsidy ended. Sexual urges are back and performance as well. I have a good friend who had DaVinci surgery early 2010 who got along great with surgery but still have potency issues.I'm not saying for you to go this route. Most men opt for surgery, and I would have also until Drs. all convinced me that that was not the best option for me. Read, research, get many opinions and do what suits you best. There are tons of data out there but unfortunatly a lot of it is dated. Get on the internet, make a list of questions to ask your Dr. and don't make a decision based on some gut you met at the local bar or such. Talk to hollywoodmark and others on this site and share your questions and concerns. I know it helped me knowing there are others out there who are willing to share your burden. This site helped me a lot. Good luck in your decision and I hope everything works out well for you.

09/06/2010 10:45 AM
hollywoodmark
hollywoodmarkPosts: 867
Member

Dack makes an excellent point in that so much of the info on the 'Net is dated. If you can, it's good to check how recent a site has been updated. I also agree with him that it's you, your partner, and your doc who'll have to make this decision. And don't limit yourself to just one urologist. If you can, talk to several--perhaps ones that come at the problem from different angles.
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