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03/01/2013 07:29 AM

How did I become so extroverted?

JEHJR
 
Posts: 214
Member

Cool I have been reading, writing, a speaking about every aspect of prostate cancer. From how I discovered cancer to how I am dealing with the impacts this disease is having on my life. Since I found this forum I have posted with regards to end of life, physical therapy, ED, incontinence, relationships, who I am/was.

Last night after having several conversations recently with family and friends I Googled, "embarrassed after having a baby." One site led to another and the next thing I found myself reading about was, how open woman where after the delivery. This sudden exposure to acting extroverted appears to be normal and fades over time. What can you now talk about that you would have never considered prior to PC?

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03/01/2013 07:54 AM
JEHJR
 
Posts: 214
Member

Silly Let me start by suggesting one discussion I read on this forum that I have had to be open about. This is not a subject that is easy or frankly well excepted in public arenas. "Sex"

Minnie Joycelyn Elders the first African American appointed as Surgeon General of the United States. She was fired mid-term in December 1994 amidst controversy. In 1994, she was invited to speak at a United Nations conference on AIDS. She was asked whether it would be appropriate to promote masturbation as a means of preventing young people from engaging in riskier forms of sexual activity, and she replied, "I think that it is part of human sexuality, and perhaps it should be taught."

I was taken back when my urologist informed me that because of surgery and the trauma caused I should do certain things. He was considered aggressive in the way he handled impedance. He felt it was very important "to use it or lose it." He also felt it was considered a quality of life issue.

Post edited by: JEHJR, at: 03/03/2013 02:26 AM


03/03/2013 10:41 AM
JEHJR
 
Posts: 214
Member

How did your catheterization go? I found 2 things that bothered me. First was trying to get a cream for tip which dried out. And the other was not having a vent on the bag.

03/03/2013 12:25 PM
JEHJR
 
Posts: 214
Member

In 87 I had my first introduction to catheters. As I laid in the recovery room with a full bladder I wondered how I was going to relieve myself. The surgery was on my hip and I had specifically asked to not have one. Unfortunately I couldn't use a bathroom or pee bottle. So I had no choice but to watch the nurse insert the catheter. Quite a strange feeling. It didn't hurt anything but my pride. Once my bladder was empty I could not understand why I had rejected the Doctors recommendation. Here we are almost 30 years later and I do not remember the nurse even taking it out.

This time I was sleeping when they brought me to surgery and I awoke to having it in place. Lucky I had spent time reading about prostate surgery. Someone had suggested that you apply lubricant at the tip of your penis to prevent chafing. A friend who had prostate surgery was never given cream and it rubbed raw when he walked. This is the kind of incident that war stories are created from. These stories are unfortunate and with all the things you can't control why add to the list?

I also found that the "Bag" did not have a vent. When you drain your bag from the bottom a vacuum is created and when there is no air in the bag urine has a difficult time entering the bag. How did I find out? I had the erg to pee so what do you normally do? Push! That's right! And because the urine cannot go in the bag as quick as you are peeing, that too is right, a mess!

Someone said if you don't laugh, you'll cry. So when I figured out I was not going to die, I laughed and tried to figure out what I was doing wrong.

If you drain from the bottom make sure you leave some air in the bag!

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