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04/27/2012 06:39 AM

7 Simple Ways To Say “No”

DorisAnn
DorisAnn  
Posts: 1638
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I'm an Advocate

Simple Ways To Say “No”

Rather than avoid it altogether, it's all about learning the right way to say no. After I began to say no to others, I realized it's really not as bad as I thought. The other people were very understanding and didn't put up any resistance. Really, the fears of saying no are just in our mind.

If you are not sure how to do so, here are 7 simple ways for you to say no. Use the method that best meets your needs in the situation.

1. “I can't commit to this as I have other priorities at the moment.”

If you are too busy to engage in the request/offer, this will be applicable. This lets the person know your plate is full at the moment, so he/she should hold off on this as well as future requests. If it makes it easier, you can also share what you're working on so the person can understand better. I use this when I have too many commitments to attend to.

2. “Now's not a good time as I'm in the middle of something. How about we reconnect at X time?”

It's common to get sudden requests for help when you are in the middle of something. Sometimes I get phone calls from friends or associates when I'm in a meeting or doing important work. This method is a great way to (temporarily) hold off the request. First, you let the person know it's not a good time as you are doing something. Secondly, you make known your desire to help by suggesting another time (at your convenience). This way, the person doesn't feel blown off.

3. “I'd love to do this, but …”

I often use this as it's a gentle way of breaking no to the other party. It's encouraging as it lets the person know you like the idea (of course, only say this if you do like it) and there's nothing wrong about it. I often get collaboration proposals from fellow bloggers and business associates which I can't participate in and I use this method to gently say no. Their ideas are absolutely great, but I can't take part due to other reasons such as prior commitments (#1) or different needs (#5).

4. “Let me think about it first and I'll get back to you.”

This is more like a “Maybe” than a straight out “No”. If you are interested but you don't want to say ‘yes' just yet, use this. Sometimes I'm pitched a great idea which meets my needs, but I want to hold off on committing as I want some time to think first. There are times when new considerations pop in and I want to be certain of the decision before committing myself. If the person is sincere about the request, he/she will be more than happy to wait a short while. Specify a date / time-range (say, in 1-2 weeks) where the person can expect a reply.

If you're not interested in what the person has to offer at all, don't lead him/her on. Use methods #5, #6 or #7 which are definitive.

5. “This doesn't meet my needs now but I'll be sure to keep you in mind.”

If someone is pitching a deal/opportunity which isn't what you are looking for, let him/her know straight-out that it doesn't meet your needs. Otherwise, the discussion can drag on longer than it should. It helps as the person know it's nothing wrong about what he/she is offering, but that you are looking for something else. At the same time, by saying you'll keep him/her in mind, it signals you are open to future opportunities.

6. “I'm not the best person to help on this. Why don't you try X?”

If you are being asked for help in something which you (i) can't contribute much to (ii) don't have resources to help, let it be known they are looking at the wrong person. If possible, refer them to a lead they can follow-up on – whether it's someone you know, someone who might know someone else, or even a department. I always make it a point to offer an alternate contact so the person doesn't end up in a dead end. This way you help steer the person in the right place.

7. “No, I can't.”

The simplest and most direct way to say no. We build up too many barriers in our mind to saying no. As I shared earlier in this article, these barriers are self-created and they are not true at all. Don't think so much about saying no and just say it outright. You'll be surprised when the reception isn't half as bad as what you imagined it to be.

Learn to say no to requests that don't meet your needs, and once you do that you'll find how easy it actually is. You'll get more time for yourself, your work and things that are most important to you. I know I do and I'm happy I started doing that.

http://zenhabits.net/say-no/[url]

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04/28/2012 09:50 PM
bradd
braddPosts: 49
Member

useful information. thank you. saying no can be hard to do when you worry about disappointing someone. it's something i have been working on.

04/29/2012 07:19 AM
DorisAnn
DorisAnn  
Posts: 1638
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

I totally understand....Its hard to say no when you love to please others.

Hugs

Dee


04/30/2012 05:12 AM
Clarita
Clarita  
Posts: 13055
VIP Member

Nothing worthwhile is ever easy! Saying 'No' is worthwhile as you cannot keep putting your needs last so sometimes saying No to others is saying a big YES to YOU Smile!

Bradd- fantastic to see you here!

Thanks Doris for posting this awesome article- Love You my most fine friend plus topnotch/awesome co GL!!

Super gentle hugs from this super challenged Clarita Smile


04/30/2012 05:34 AM
DorisAnn
DorisAnn  
Posts: 1638
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

Clara--

ThanksSmile

Doris

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