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11/21/2009 06:11 PM

How do you feel after surgery(page 2)

Thinginmyhead
ThinginmyheadPosts: 202
Member

Glad to hear you enjoyed a beverage yesterday! Sooooooo jealous I can't taste anything yet Smile

I think it's funny and YES frustrating too... how our minds seem to think we should be right back at 'em...but our bodies say no-way. Literally I'm drained by 1 p.m. and have to sleep for 30-40 mins to recharge. This is something new for me after surgery.

Good idea to wait for the doc to give you the go ahead.

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11/22/2009 02:30 AM
slove
slove  
Posts: 32
Member

Well now I have another take on this whole thing. I've been looking at all sorts of web sites relating to this horrible affliction & I have identified with nearly all of the symptoms of a non functioning tumor. The only ones I don't have are the full on headaches (I do get them but only very occasionally) and I don't have visual disturbances as the tumor is not yet near my optic nerves. As you can tell we are currently at a loss as to what my tumor is doing and as it is half tumor & half cyst apparently may not have a complete picture after the biopsy.

As previously posted I did have the option to wait & see or get it fixed now & I've also been advised that medication won't work at this stage. What are you supposed to do with the wait & see option....live with the weight gain, loss of libido, tiredness, no energy etc etc. Is there an alternative??

Gosh this whole thing is sooooooo absorbing isn't it??

On a lighter note I'm sitting here having a glass of wine at the moment whilst the rest of my family are in bed asleep. I live in McLaren Vale which is a renowned wine area in Australia. We have a small family transport business & we deal mainly with wine transportation. Wow I'm really going to miss my almost nightly glass of wine or two!! I guess I won't be up for it much after the op!


11/22/2009 02:37 AM
JimKT1
Posts: 281
Member

Unfortunately, that might be the only option with the wait & see method of treatment. It's pretty much monitoring tumor/cyst growth and if it gets too big then you either decide to go for the procedure or not. Depending on how you look at it, it is either fortunate or unfortunate that no two patients are the same.

Glad to read that you can still find time to enjoy yourself. I don't believe that alcohol is out of the question even after surgery and on the road to recovery. I just started to have beer again after speaking with my neurosurgeon's physician's assistant.


11/22/2009 02:47 AM
slove
slove  
Posts: 32
Member

Hi Jimkt1,

thanks for your response & thanks also for sharing your pre surgery fears the other night as it really did reasure me that we all have the same worries.

What advice have you recived about alcohol after? My neurosurgeon said I could drink up until the op but take it easy after (as in a glass of wine here & there but no more). Is that about right & how long do you wait after the op so as not to do any harm if indeed you even feel like it? It is coming up to the festive season and all so I was just wondering!


11/22/2009 03:05 AM
JimKT1
Posts: 281
Member

No thanks necessary. The members of the two Pituitary Adenoma/Tumor forums on this site are absolutely great people to deal with. I've found that there really is no subject that's taboo on here.

We all went through or are going through very similar fears.

As far as alcohol was concerned the week before surgery was a completely dry week per doctor's orders. No vitamins, no advil, no alcohol, no drugs or anything that could stay in my system for more than a day. Tylenol was acceptable.

I personally stopped drinking alcohol a month prior to surgery except for a few occassions. That was a difficult feat for me as I LOVE my beer.

As far as alcohol after surger, we received no special instructions other than to monitor my fluid input/output as well as to not physically exert myself. No picking up of objects heavier than 8-10 lbs. till my post op appointment. Sexual activity was acceptable after two weeks. Well, my wife and I broke that rule on various occasions starting four days after surgery.

When I spoke to the physician's assistant yesterday she gave me the green light on alcohol so long as I don't mix it with my prescribed narcotic, vicodin, which I do not take anyways as the pain has been limited to nothing but minor headaches.

On a side note, what I ended up doing the month before surgery was begin exercizing again. My wife and I are seasonally active people. In other words, if the weather is nice we go out and hike, bike, she'll run, etc.. Well, I figured that going into surgery in as fit a condition as possible wouldn't hurt and could only help my cause. Exercize was also a very good stress outlet and has now given me a reason to buy a new mountain bike.


11/22/2009 03:42 AM
slove
slove  
Posts: 32
Member

Yes I keep meaning to make exercise a priority before the surgery but with two little girls & running a business from home I can't seem to find the time (hmmm that does sound like a cop out). I'm making a big effort to eat very healthily and I probably do a fair bit of incidental exercise but thanks for your advice on the drinking.

We had booked and planned a holiday from Xmas day for two weeks staying in our caravan. The destination is only two hours from home, the caravan is airconditiond and I will have plenty of people to help but my Neurosurgeon was horrifed and has said no way as it is only two weeks after surgery. This is largely due to our very warm climate (two days ago it was 43 degrees celcius) and I was going to just go anyway (all going well) but now I'm in two minds. My daughter has been so excited it will break my heart to pull out now.

What time is it where you are now, is it Saturday?


11/22/2009 03:57 AM
Thinginmyhead
ThinginmyheadPosts: 202
Member

I think the wait and see option has got to be the MOST difficult. You are absolutely right in questioning...what are you supposed to just put up with the symptoms? The symptoms are bad enough in themselves and then couple that with the psychological stuff that snowballs out of it all.

I think you are doing it all just perfect. It's one day at a time and sometimes just one hour at a time. For me, I had to come to a place that I had to accept what was going on. I didn't have to like it, but once I accepted that I had little control in some areas and more control in others (exercise/eating right/getting enough rest/learning to say no) it helped me to let go of some of the impossible expectations I had put upon myself...I still have to do this consciously each day. It's the whole 80/20 rule...if you're doing it 80% of the time, you can cut yourself some slack for the other 20%.

With all that said. You are still in charge of your own health. If you don't like the watch/wait option and the symptoms that go along with that, have you tried pushing a little with the surgeon? Do you want the tumour out or are you okay waiting? If you want it out, have you said this to the surgeon straight up? My surgeons gave me options and I chose my own path--thank goodness I chose the one I did!

Hope this helps a little bit. I understand your struggle through and through. Sending you hugs.


11/22/2009 04:01 AM
JimKT1
Posts: 281
Member

Definitely keep up the healthy eating. I forgot to mention that was another one of the things that we changed in our lives. A lot more fresh fruits and vegetables.

If it were me, I'd probably have to opt out of the holiday trip. My reasoning is just in case you need medical attention. That's more of a logistics concern, but please do factor in the need for rest. Everyone on here that has given me advice has urged me to take it easy. Despite how well I feel, I can't ignore their logic. Our bodies need time to heal. This doesn't mean that we force ourselves to become lazy bums, but to limit the amount of activities.

On the other hand, as you've already realized, no two recoveries are the same. You could be good to go the day after surgery. You owe it to yourself and your family to make sure that your recovery goes as smoothly as possible and that is an extremely personal decision.

As for right now, it is 0400 this Sunday morning out in California. My wife and I are going to go to one of the local breweries that's located in the mountains and cannot wait to get back in the car. The drive is going to be FUN since I recently adjusted the suspension on my car. Hopefully we'll have time to stop by the Bionicon US headquarters to check out mountain bikes.

Post edited by: JimKT1, at: 11/22/2009 04:02 AM


11/22/2009 10:19 PM
slove
slove  
Posts: 32
Member

Hi Thinginmyhead,

Did you have a non functioning adenoma? I'm not sure what mine is yet I just know it's macro. I am going ahead with the surgery and although not 100% convinced I'm doing the right thing I've made the decision so will have to wait and see I guess. The operation is on the 10th of December so less than 3 weeks........YIKES!

You obviously made the decision to have surgery too. It sounds like you're glad you did is that right?


11/23/2009 03:46 AM
Thinginmyhead
ThinginmyheadPosts: 202
Member

Hi Slove,

I totally empathize with how you are feeling. I was so scared, many sleepless nights and lots of prayers! I knew in my gut it was the right thing to do. I was so desperate to have it removed because my headaches were causing such excruciating pain and my sight was going, I could barely get through the day. I have 3 young children and just to be able to function I was taking several ibuprofen combined with tylenol (18-24 a day) just to be able to get through. I know these over the counter drugs are horrible for my kidneys and liver but couldn't function otherwise. I had to take the risk to have the tumour removed and the headaches begone...even though my docs all said 'not convinced the tumour is related to the headaches'. It was only after the surgery they all were convince that the headaches were attributed, when they saw the hemorrages and the size and the location. Yes I'm glad I had it done. I'm sure you will be too.

I tried not to focus on what I knew the risks to be, relied heavily on my faith and the support of my family and friends. Focused on the here and now and not the 'what if's'. Also constantly reminded myself that these people on the medical team are experienced, neurosurgeons alone but in another 8 years after the several already spent at med school...then they have to practice for years and specialize...they are trained professionals and know what they are doing.

Yes mine is a non functioning macroadenoma--only confirmed by pathology after surgery. My neuro thought it was a RCC the entire time because of it's cystic nature.

Keep talking through your fears Slove, we've all been there and we are all here for you.

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