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09/04/2010 05:19 PM

bipolar vs. borderline

sarahnicole7

i am just uneducated about personality disorders and joined to learn more because my counselor thinks i have borderline personality disorder..

he hasn't diagnosed me yet or anything but he thinks that my other psych. diagnosed me incorrectly.. i've been trying to treat bipolar 2 disorder for over a year.. havent found meds yet. but he thinks it's more borderline personality.

can someone describe the differences between the two so i can kind of .. evaluate myself?

Post edited by: sarahnicole7, at: 09/04/2010 05:21 PM

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09/04/2010 06:14 PM
turtlegirl
turtlegirl  
Posts: 323
Member

Sorry not much help here. From what I understand, there's a fine line that seperates them, I think with personality disorder a person is more self destructed, as like cutting on so on. But that's just from what I have heard from others. Sorry. There's a girl who pops in every once in awhile who is really knowledgeable and can probably answer your question, if you want to look her up, I'll see if I can find her.

09/04/2010 08:46 PM
sarahnicole7

Thanks. so basically i could have either one and it wouldnt really matter which because they are both very similar.

09/06/2010 09:56 AM
Indubitably
Indubitably  
Posts: 856
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I'm an Advocate

I never have understood the comparison of BPD and bipolar. In my opinion, they're not very alike at all, and are easily distinguishable. Bipolar causes depressive episodes interrupted by (generally shorter) episodes of mania. How people behave when depressed or manic might be like the behaviors typically displayed by those with BPD, but those cycles of depression and mania == bipolar. Without them, no.

BPD is typically a result of a deep-rooted fear of abandonment. It involves splitting (or black and white thinking) where people are either with you or against you, there is no in-between... no grey area. Some of the common self-destructive behaviors are similar to what you would find from someone with bipolar in a manic episode, but that splitting is a clear sign of BPD. We have a terrible time with personal and professional relationships because we fear people will abandon us, and we often will go to great (and often unnecessary) lengths to either prevent that or to push them away before they have the opportunity to do it to us.

That's just scratching the surface, of course. They're both very complex disorders, but they do (in my opinion) have very clear symptoms specific to each that must be present to diagnose. Also, comorbidity is possible with these, meaning someone may be diagnosed with both.

Elle


09/06/2010 10:13 AM
Indubitably
Indubitably  
Posts: 856
Senior Member
I'm an Advocate

I just want to point out too, because most people don't consider it, that these disorders and what defines them isn't a stone solid thing. Psychology is still pretty much in its infancy. It's sort of a split off from philosophy, but as far as attempting to understand and define the various dysfunctions of the human mind, it's only been a century or so of research, and a lot of that from the earlier decades wasn't reliable. It's still a whole lot of theory and not a whole lot of fact. More disorders are named, defined, and classified periodically; but these are just the ideas of psychologists.

It's not the same as a medical diagnosis. An appendicitis is clearly that, no question. Mental disorders, though, aren't so clear. They're very complex. Their symptoms overlap with other disorders because psychologists have taken all these different symptoms and decided if one set of symptoms [A] presents with another set of symptoms [B], then it's this disorder. But if A presents with this other set [C], then it's this other disorder.

They're constantly debating what should be considered what. They divide disorders (think bipolar types I and II, for example) depending on frequency or severity of symptoms. And they also constantly debate whether the differences between patients indicates differences in the disorder or the possibility of it being two separate disorders that often present together.

I know it's probably sounding jumbly now, but that's sort of the point. Psychology is young and it's still jumbled up. Regardless of what label you get for your symptoms, focus on the symptoms and ways to improve them. Look at what disorders include your symptoms and research ways to treat it. If you're lucky enough to have a therapist, talk to them about those treatment options. At least if whatever you're therapist is currently trying isn't working.

The most important thing is to try to find out why the disorder developed and how to fix it. It's not about finding the right medication to mask the symptoms. It's about finding the source and repairing it as best as one can.

Elle

.

Post edited by: Indubitably, at: 09/06/2010 10:17 AM


09/06/2010 12:26 PM
turtlegirl
turtlegirl  
Posts: 323
Member

WOW!! Thanks so so much Elle for responding. Like I said, "I" don't know much! I was all wrong. I hope this helps you sarahnicole, best wishes. Keep us posted.

09/06/2010 12:48 PM
sarahnicole7

it has sort of helped me thanks. i think i must have both then but i'm not sure still. but you are right, it definitely doesn't matter in the end what you have. just find out how to deal with or treat whatever symptoms you have.

09/08/2010 07:51 PM
mem8850

I think i may be able to clear this up......the nutshell version.

Borderlines usually have suffered some sort of sexual abuse, or physical abuse..........most (MOST) seek people's attention, including their doctors.

BIPO are people who have severe mood swings,they don't have to be manic....they just have endless wavering mood swings, and are less likely to have suffered any kind of abuse

PLEASE i have this from a VERY good source, and am not wishing to alienate anyone....i feel the same compassion as i would ANYBODY.

Blessed Be...........robert12345

I'm NOT saying BIPO are in an endless mood swing.....or that borderlines will endlessly seek attention.....much of these issues can be controlled with modern medicine....it's just the nutshell version.....because this could become a hot topic.

Post edited by: robert12345, at: 09/08/2010 07:54 PM


09/14/2010 11:25 PM
shaz66
shaz66  
Posts: 802
Member

My two cents. I have Bipolar Disorder, and Personality Disorder. One does not exclude the other.

09/15/2010 07:05 PM
mem8850

Thank you Shaz......is there any more clarification you can provide for us? I'm not familiar as you are about this subject....how does it feel? Do you switch back and forth alot? Just a general description for us all would be of great interest....you know SO much about it, and i know just BASIC what iv'e heard....so this one is all you SHAZ.....please clarify for us so we know better....Myself.....i am VERY interested to learn more.....thanks for anything you can provide us with.
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