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02/18/2011 06:24 AM

High School.Follies.. I know she's gonna loose.

Beautysmom
Beautysmom  
Posts: 17
New Member

My daughter believes that a substitute teacher has it out for her, becuase the woman is the mother of a cheerleader. She says she remembers the woman saying she hated her, and hated band kids in 6th grade. She says the woman glares at her. They got into it because we asked for assement of the possibility of my daughter being Dyslexic - she was upset that she'd failed a vocab test - and this in turn led to a spanish inquisition into whether or not she did her work, led by this teacher. They got into it in the hallway, and I got a call from the guidance counselor that made it sound like it was all my daughter's fault.

It came out in conseling that the regular teacher who had this class till just about when my daughter was hospitalized for attempted suicide, retired due to medical reasons. He was a calm, patient old man that would help my daughter in a way that worked for her - her grades were fine under him. This woman is more of a martinent.

I fully believe that the woman has an attitude about my kid - that is the norm around here, if you are not one of the golden haired perfect kids, trust me. Did she say those things? I don't know. I do know that the party line of the administration will be that she's a wonderful person, a wonderful teacher and that ... this was all my daughter's fault.

I could tell you a story about how prejudiced this school is against the misfits, but it would make me, my daughter, and my town too easy to identify to anyone from there. The story would make you sick.

I feel kind of like getting a big bat right now.

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02/18/2011 11:18 AM
gardengirl
gardengirl  
Posts: 1727
Senior Member

As an educator, this makes me soooo angry! There has to be someone there to stand up for your daughter, and I'm glad that you are doing it. There isn't any room for that kind of behavior from a teacher. It shouldn't matter to her if your daughter might be dyslexic, except that it would make it clearer how your daughter needs to be taught. If she did fine with the other teacher, then it would make sense that perhaps this substitute needs to be watched more closely? What type of teaching credentials does she have? Would it be possible for you to get a list of assignments at the start of the week so you can monitor your daughter's progress? If the original teacher retired, who is designing curriculum?

02/18/2011 12:05 PM
Beautysmom
Beautysmom  
Posts: 17
New Member

THANK YOU for giving me some questions to ask when we see her in -home visiting therapist ( who also sees her in school as well ) to advocate for her! I had no idea to even ask those things.

She may not be dyslexic... They don't think she is. They based that conclusion on several recent samples of her work, that's all. I have no idea if that is adequate or not.

The way the guidance counselor presented it to me when she called was designed to make me think my child was a liar.. and I did.. till I heard her side of it.. her grades were fine before this new teacher came. That was what made the light go on in my head that even if some of this is delusion or even a lie, not all of it is, not by a long shot.


02/20/2011 09:58 AM
gardengirl
gardengirl  
Posts: 1727
Senior Member

I hope things go well -- please keep us informed! If I can think of anything else that might help, I'll post...

02/20/2011 11:07 AM
Beautysmom
Beautysmom  
Posts: 17
New Member

I discussed this with her the other day, and she said that if I try to pull any other trump cards, they'll put her in special ed, she doesn't want that. Do I have the right to refuse that, but still demand she gets other help?

02/20/2011 02:02 PM
gardengirl
gardengirl  
Posts: 1727
Senior Member

First, were you discussing things with your daughter or the counselor?

I'm not too familiar with the details and nuances of 504 plans or IEPs -- these are Special Ed documents written to provide accommodations for students. I'm a general education teacher, so my knowledge base is limited. However... the point is to get your daughter an education, and if she needs a different approach through SpEd, then she should have access to that. These are legal documents that are written to meet the emotional/physical needs of the student and are a protection both for your daughter and the school. It can be as simple or as complex as necessary -- and doesn't mean she has to go into self-contained classrooms or anything like that.

Having SpEd services or accommodations does not mean that your daughter will be put into "special" classes or be openly labeled. I teach honors level history (9th and 12th grades) and have kids with both IEPs and 504s in my classroom. It is confidential information, and it helps me help these kids much more effectively. It may mean extra time to finish an exam, seating in a particular place in the classroom, access to word processing technology, or an outlined arrangement if she gets stressed and needs to leave the classroom. I've worked just this year alone with kids who have severe depression, congitive difficulties that impact written expression, ADHD, recovery from cancer, and other issues. They all learn and are all technically Special Education students. It just means they have different kinds of support from me in the classroom and I am told exactly what it is that they need.

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