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04/22/2010 03:07 AM

What's the "proceedure"?

NoMreW8nC
NoMreW8nC  
Posts: 85
Member

I don't know if someone already asked this because there's a lot of posts, but, how do I know if the psych evaluation is "legit"? I mean, my daughter has had 2 and like I mentioned in a different post, the 1st one was like 15 minutes long & my daughter didn't utter a sound. I didn't even know that he was even doing it.

This 2nd time, back in February, the doctor asked a few questions, my daughter may have said 2-3 words in the 45 minutes that the Eval took place. It just didn't seem like enough to me and that I should've been out of the room because like I told him, she won't talk if I'm in the room, to which he told me, "if she doesn't speak, I can't give her meds."

Is there something more they do or is that all there is??? Blush Angry

Post edited by: NoMreW8nC, at: 04/22/2010 03:08 AM

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04/22/2010 03:12 PM
owutatangledweb
owutatangledwebPosts: 2771
Senior Member

Any doctor doing an evaluation for this should be interviewing you as well as her. Many times, the person who is bipolar, especially if they are young, aren't really aware that their behaviors are unusual or extreme. That's why it's important to hear from family members as well. The evaluation should start with the patient though. There are more thorough psychological evaluations that can be performed though. There are different BP inventories and there is also the MMPI which is a written question and answer-type evaluation although I'm not sure that will necessarily result in a BP diagnosis. But, it is a test that can be helpful in evaluating many conditions. Maybe it would be helpful to get a BP checklist online and print it off and check off the symptoms you see in her to give to the next pdoc that evaluates her, or even to her current pdoc, so that they can be more aware of her behaviors. Also, sometimes a pdoc likes to observe them over several months before making a diagnosis. Has she ever been on any medications, and if so, what were they and how did she react? Sometimes the answers to these questions help a pdoc to diagnose, especially if there is a reaction to an antidepressant. I certainly am no medical doctor, but I hope some of this will help you. And, if you've never read the book, "The Bipolar Child", it's a good book to read. Good luck to you.

04/22/2010 05:04 PM
NoMreW8nC
NoMreW8nC  
Posts: 85
Member

I did exactly that, before this site, I found The Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation (http://www.bpchildresearch.org/index.html) and there's a section in FAQS that I printed out and highlighted everything we go through with her. They only have her on meds that treat ADHD but they don't work and when I tell them they don't work, they just up the dosage or try a new med. My daughter did tell me when she was first put on the Prozac that it did help, but after like 3 months, it stopped working and then they took her off of it for a while and there was no difference. But for whatever reason, the newer Pdoc (in Feb) put her back on it. The other day, we had an "episode" with her where she was told "no" for something and she wigged out, went into the kitchen by the microwave cart, curled up into a ball and just stayed there on the floor for like an hour. I took a picture and yesterday, my daughter found it when she was going to use my camera and asked me who that was, she didn't remember doing that. She sees the Pdoc every month (for the last 2.5 yrs.) & they never do anything different.

04/22/2010 07:56 PM
jbsmom
jbsmom  
Posts: 1291
Senior Member

NoMreW8nC - I saw the pictures you posted in your profile. I noticed one of your captions about your daughter mentioned that she doesn't smile much. My son has been like that for the last two years! He's been a little better since he's been on the neurontin. It's only a lttle better, not much. Is this just another "perc" of BP or what?

I wish you well with your appointment coming up with the pdoc. I really hope they listen to you. I have no idea why they would only talk to your daughter. My pdoc talked to the both of us at the same time. The first appointment was very uncomfortable for me. I wasn't expecting to go in together. His first question was, "Why are you here?". So with my son sitting right next to me, I had to tell him all the crap that had been going on in the last 2 years. My son had filled out a questionairre in the waiting room. I have no idea what was on it nor how my son answered them. But in the course of the appointment my son did offer up that he had thought of cutting himself. I hadn't known that. That was a surprise.

I guess you gotta be persistent with how you want your appointment to go. After all you are paying the bill...ya know?

Again, good luck and let us know how it goes.


04/23/2010 02:14 PM
owutatangledweb
owutatangledwebPosts: 2771
Senior Member

If a person truly is bipolar, giving them an antidepessant like prozac without a mood stabilizer can send them into mania. You need to let the pdoc know what her reactions to prozac have been.

04/23/2010 08:54 PM
NoMreW8nC
NoMreW8nC  
Posts: 85
Member

Yup, been there, done that. Apparently since I've never gone to college or taken college level classes of anatomy & physiology, I'm not smart enough to know my daughter better than them. I've been constantly told I'm over reacting and/or, just wait & see.

04/25/2010 09:55 AM
gardengirl
gardengirl  
Posts: 1727
Senior Member

I was told that once, and it enfuriated me -- especially since the surgeon apologized 24 hours later after the sinus procedure he thought was "overreaction" took three times as long as it should have.

YOU are the expert on YOUR daughter! Yes, they have education, and know what the patterns for these illnesses are, and can prescribe medications. But no doctor can replace YOU as the person who is living with this 24/7/365.

Even though she's an adult (my daughter is 23), her PDoc knows to listen to me because -- as you have discovered -- she doesn't remember her behaviors or realize how out-of-control she gets sometimes. I can tell when she's starting to get manic, and when she is heading for a downer, LONG before she's aware of it.

Keep records, just like you have been. Documentation is important in letting them in to see what your daughter's behaviors are. And no level of education can replace that kind of information.


04/25/2010 06:55 PM
NoMreW8nC
NoMreW8nC  
Posts: 85
Member

Yup, thanks Gardengirl, I found mood charts online & printed them up so we've been tracking her that way.
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