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12/20/2007 06:36 PM

What all is NDPH affecting?

goonybgood
goonybgood  
Posts: 15
New Member

I've been really frustrated with all of the side effects of the meds I'm on, and I've been trying to wean off Everything. Nothing is getting rid of this ache!

I got cortisone injections in my occipital nerves and down my neck. The doctors have found that I am always very tense in my neck and shoulders and have lots of knots.

Does anyone else have a problem with extreme tenseness in their head, neck, and shoulders?

I definitely relate to the comments about the "blood rush" feeling!

Is anyone having a hard time shutting off your mind while you're trying to fall asleep? I'm exhausted all day, and when I go to bed at night, even though I'm tired, I just sit there thinking uncontrollably. I didn't used to have many problems with anxiety and being attention deficit before I got NDPH. Is it related? Wassat

Thank You all! This group means so very much to me.

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12/20/2007 11:36 PM
MaryR
MaryR  
Posts: 4120
Group Leader

For what it is worth anxiety is often seen with people who deal with any kind of chronic pain. Quite a few of my former clients at the nursing home got referred for anxiety related to chronic pain (I made the connection, not the nursing home) but it makes sense, you tend to worry more when you know you are going to hurt but don't know how bad it is going to be. Then you get tense and it just hurts that much more. Bad cycle, especially for fragile old people.

I would not be surprised if your muscle tension and anxiety kind of track together (anything that helps one will tend to improve the other, they may be in a feedback loop; body tension triggers anxiety, and when you worry you tense more.) I have no idea about the attention deficit symptoms. Maybe difficulty concentrating from meds or pain??? If you have hyperactivity then I really don't know.

Something to explore with the doctors is if they think reducing the tension in your shoulders and neck might help with the headache. If so you might be able to get a referral for therapeutic massages or something like that. They may even know a way to get it covered (or partly covered by insurance). I don't know if it would help the headache or not, but I sure wouldn't mind giving that particular form of treatment a try (sounds a lot better than meds to me). If it doesn't work at least you won't have bad side effects.


12/21/2007 01:58 PM
BritChick
 
Posts: 57
Member

I think Mary is quite right, and would add that in my reading I've found (eg. on the UK NHS pages) that the thinking over here is that some of the treatment for a chronic headache, as well as meds, should be one or more of the relaxing or mechanical therapies to help with the secondary symptoms of pain like muscle-bunching and anxiety - so massage is recommended by some specialists and that might make it easier to get a medical referral for it (but...I went for one and hated it, couldn't bear the increased head pain after about 10 minutes or so, as it just sent more blood to my head and stimulated all the bits in my neck and shoulders that connect to and lead up to the nerves in my head that seemed to be the ones that were always firing, so massage's not for everyone)

or physiotherapy may help - my consultant sent me for physio and she gave me exercises to help loosen my stiff and painful neck, which would help my neck a little (and the neck stiffness only happened when the headache started so I think there must be some connection there). She also got me to look at my careless posture, which is another thing that will increase muscle tension since it tends to be you're using the wrong and weaker muscles to support your head.

But also on this forum there's one or two people who really like cranio-sacral therapy/cranial osteopathy, one of the effects of which (the practitioners say) is to increase blood flow and therefore oxygen to the over-stimulated nerves that are constantly firing. The cranial osteopathist I've been seeing was also interested in getting me to reduce the stress and anxiety I was feeling from my head, my work situation, and the general feeling of being helpless and out of control, so if you could find a sympathetic practitioner of this you may find there's a double benefit - loosening your neck and shoulders, and helping you not to tense so much.

I'm very much a person who thinks uncontrollably in bed but due to not getting enough cardio exercise because it brought additional pain, I've been going to bed very tired from pain but not really tired in body (if you get my meaning) as well as worried about everything, and thinking too much about the ever-present pain.

I've been doing meditation a little (you can find free guided meditations online if you want to try), trying to breathe deeper generally (from the diaphragm as opposed to up in your chest) and keep the shoulders relaxed when doing so, trying to remember abuot my posture, and also have found that listening to my audiobooks at night help me to take my mind off whatever hook it's on and concentrate on the story instead - it doesn't always work, but definitely enough to make me think I'll continue to use it prety much always!

Also lavender or peppermint oil might help you relax in bed - just one or two drops on your pillow. If you're into smelly stuff, rose is supposed to produce a euphoric sort of feel, so that might be a good one to sniff or rub on your temples if you start to get worried or into the kind of thinking-loop I get into!

Again, these things will probably not be a cure on their own, but may provide a small amount of relief. Hope some of this helps.


01/16/2008 09:09 AM
Irishgirl77
Irishgirl77  
Posts: 12
Member

I have daily headaches/migraines and they usually start in the occtipital region of my head. My neck & shoulders are ALWAYS tense and full of knots. Professional message doesn't even help. Feels great during but usually intensifies the headache after.

01/16/2008 10:49 AM
bgcmom
bgcmom  
Posts: 246
Member

We tried professional massage for the occipital head pain----and the same results, intensified afterward! Same w/chiropractic care!

Our headache specialist explained it to us as this: It overstimulates an area where the nerves are hypersensitive! Our daughters' headache is across the forehead, with pin-point nerve sensitivities and at C2-C3. He said those are out of line, but it is not something chiropractic would help, in that it is the nerves from the spinal colum through to the occipital area to the bundle of nerves at the forehead area that is effected. So...it explained why she worsened.

I don't know if your situation is the same or not, as this is so individualized, but what you describe is the same as what my daughter goes through.

You might want to talk to your doctor about this and see what he/she thinks!

I hope you feel better!


01/16/2008 01:59 PM
MaryR
MaryR  
Posts: 4120
Group Leader

Wow, mental note to self- massage and can hurt for some people. I knew a chiro might help or might hurt, but I didn't know massage was the same way. Thanks for the information everybody.
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