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08/21/2008 05:47 PM

Could this be NDPH? Weird pain. Opinions wanted

Schnauzer
Posts: 1
New Member

Hi,

I am new to this forum and I'm not sure if the symptoms that I have are consistent with NDPH. It started back in October of 2007. I got a bad cold and shortly after I started getting sinus pressure, pressure in temples, as if my head was being squeazed between a vice. I also got burning in my nose and felt as if there was weight on the bridge of my nose. I would also get occipital pain. The weird thing is that although I thought it was a sinus infection, there was absolutely no runny nose or stuffiness. I went on antibiotics, saw ENT for Cat Scans and everything looked fine. I keep explaining to doctors that it is almost as if my temples feel my heart pump blood through my veins. About 6 months after this started, I started getting pain in my front teeth, again, a type of pulsating pain, the pulsating is in sync with the pulsating that I get in my temples and occiput. I've been to see a TMJ specialist who said I must be clenching, but my back teeth don't hurt and my front teeth don't even touch together and those are the ones that are hurting. I've been fitted with a splint, but nothing helps. All of this pain doesn't ever go away. When I wake up in the morning, the pain is less, but then 15 minutes later it starts up again. My pain is a dull type of pain, but constant and meds don't seem to work. I also get fullness in my ears occasionally.

Can anyone give me any thoughts on what this may be? Does this sound like NDPH?

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08/21/2008 06:56 PM
jrz30
jrz30  
Posts: 466
Member

It is very hard to tell.

To be diagnosed as NDPH, headache must last more than three months and be daily from within three days of onset. It is bilateral, has a pressing/tightning (non-pulsing) quality, is mild to moderate in intensity, and is not aggravated by routine physical activity. Patients must also experience both of the following:

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photophobia, phonophobia or mild nausea and

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neither moderate or severe nausea nor vomiting

In 2002, Li and Rozen conducted the largest study of NDPH to date based on 56 patients from the Jefferson Headache Center in Philadelphia:

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82% of patients knew the exact day their headache started.

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In 30% of the patients, the onset of the headache occurred in correlation with an infection or flu-like illness.

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38% of patients had a prior personal history of headache.

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29$ of patients had a family history of headache.

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Accompanying symptoms:

o

68% reported nausea.

o

66% reported photophobia.

o

61% reported phonophoiba.

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55% reported lightheadedness.

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Imaging and laboratory testing was unremarkable except for an unusually high number of patients who tested positive for a past Epstein-Barr virus infection.

Webpage: http://headaches.about.com/od/otherheadpain/a/ndph.htm


08/21/2008 06:58 PM
MaryR
MaryR  
Posts: 4121
Group Leader

Hi Schnauzer, Welcome to the forum. You have a lot of the symptoms of NDPH (the headache obviously) and other people on this forum have also had trouble with their ears feeling full even though the ENT assures them that they are not. Sinus pain and TMJ diagnosis are not unusual either (some probably actually do have TMJ, others like you, probably don't). The symptom that is not typical and may point to some other type of headache (like migraine, or something I don't know about) is the pulsating pain that mimics your heartbeat.

Here is a link to an article that compares some of the different types of chronic headache: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/content/full/105/4_suppl/23S#SEC3

There are lots more that have specific causes, but I haven't found any nicely organized articles comparing them. Other than migraines I don't know what types of headaches come with pulsating pain, but I am sure there are others.

The boundaries between these categories are sometimes a little fuzzy. I apparently have both NDPH and migraine at the same time because I have too many symptoms for just NDPH, but I experience it all as the same headache (my migraine symptoms don't come and go). So don't be too surprized if you don't end up fitting neatly into any of the categories.

I would ask to be referred to a neurologist who specializes in headaches if that is at all possible. For most of us that was the first step to actually getting correctly diagnosed. The main thing is to find someone who has treated difficult headaches before, is keeping up with what research there is, and that you can work with. If you end up having NDPH or chronic migraine you will probably have to try a number of different medications in your search for something that works for you. I hope this helps give you a starting place at least.


08/22/2008 08:41 AM
newmommy3
newmommy3Posts: 255
Member

it very well could be but i would see a specialist or a head ache clinic. i hope u find answers. my pain is in my forhead and brow.
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