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04/18/2012 11:51 AM

Just For Today-Daily Meditations(page 2)

mem1844

I'm sorry if my post implied we should not look inward. It is impossible not to experience an enormous amount of self reflection while trying to battle addiction. It is vital that you become honest with yourself in order to truly understand the things that need to change. Know thyself is an old proverb.

I guess for me I believe very much in the human spirit and that a higher power is only manifested through act of goodness that we do. I notice an incredible difference when i do things without consideration for others than when I'm charitable. It's this I meant to imply. Humans are very habitual and the brain is sort of like a machine. We need to train ourselves into doing good things rather than living unhealthy lifestyles. Once it takes root, you find yourself in a more pleasant state of being. Hope that clarifies.

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04/18/2012 12:01 PM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

Don't apologize. This is the talking place. Where we talk things out to better understand. Please don't be sorry for mild opinions. Everyone has them! :hug:

04/18/2012 12:29 PM
mem1844

I have to be careful sometimes. I can be arrogant and argumentative. I'm making a pass at humility whilst still trying to maintain my point of view. LOL. Hug back at you

04/20/2012 03:57 PM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 20

Detachment

“Addiction is a family disease, but we could only change ourselves.”

––––=––––

Many of us come from severely damaged families. At times, the insanity that reigns among our relatives feels overwhelming. Sometimes we feel like packing our bags and moving far, far away.

We pray that our family members will join us in recovery but, to our great sadness, this does not always happen. Sometimes, despite our best efforts to carry the message, we find that we cannot help those we hold most dear. Our group experience has taught us that, frequently, we are too close to our relatives to help them. We learn it is better to leave them in our Higher Power's care.

We have found that when we stop trying to settle the problems of family members, we give them the room they need to work things out in their own lives. By reminding them that we are not able to solve their problems for them, we give ourselves the freedom to live our own lives. We have faith that God will help our relatives. Often, the best thing we can give our loved ones is the example of our own ongoing recovery. For the sake of our family's sanity and our own, we must let our relatives find their own ways to recover.

––––=–––

Just for today: I will seek to work my own program and leave my family in the care of a Higher Power.


04/21/2012 10:26 AM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 21

Fear

“We have found that we had no choice except to completely change our old ways of thinking or go back to using.”

Basic Text, p. 22

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Many of us find that our old ways of thinking were dominated by fear. We were afraid that we wouldn't be able to get our drugs or that there wouldn't be enough. We feared discovery, arrest, and incarceration. Further down the list were fears of financial problems, homelessness, overdose, and illness. And our fear controlled our actions.

The early days of recovery weren't a great deal different for many of us; then, too, fear dominated our thinking. “What if staying clean hurts too much?” we asked ourselves. “What if I can't make it? What if the people in NA don't like me? What if NA doesn't work?” The fear behind these thoughts can still control our behavior, keeping us from taking the risks necessary to stay clean and grow. It may seem easier to resign ourselves to certain failure, giving up before we start, than to risk everything on a slim hope. But that kind of thinking leads only to relapse.

To stay clean, we must find the willingness to change our old ways of thinking. What has worked for other addicts can work for us—but we must be willing to try it. We must trade in our old cynical doubts for new affirmations of hope. When we do, we'll find it's worth the risk.

––––=––––

Just for today: I pray for the willingness to change my old ways of thinking, and for the ability to overcome my fears.Ermm


04/22/2012 04:48 AM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 22

Traveling the open road

“This is our road to spiritual growth.”

Basic Text, p. 37

––––=––––

When we arrived at our first NA meeting, it looked like the end of the road to many of us. We weren't going to be able to use anymore. We were spiritually bankrupt. Most of us were totally isolated and didn't think we had much to live for. Little did we realize that, as we began our program of recovery, we were stepping onto a road of unlimited possibilities.

At first, just not using was tough enough. Yet, as we watched other addicts working the steps and applying those principles in their lives, we began to see that recovery was more than just not using. The lives of our NA friends had changed. They had a relationship with the God of their understanding. They were responsible members of the fellowship and of society. They had a reason to live. We began to believe these things were possible for us, too.

As we continue our recovery journey, we can get sidetracked by complacency, intolerance, or dishonesty. When we do, we need to recognize the signs quickly and get back on our path—the open road to freedom and growth.

––––=––––

Just for today: I am continuing to develop my spiritual, social, and general living skills by applying the principles of my program. I can travel as far as I wish on the open road of recovery.


04/23/2012 06:42 AM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

(seems like these readings keep coming at just the right time, doesn't it? Sometimes I think that the pages in the book are blank until I open it, and words just appear on the page just for me Just For Today)

April 23

A God of our own understanding

“Many of us understand God to be simply whatever force keeps us clean.”

Basic Text, p. 25

––––=––––

Some of us enter recovery with a working understanding of a Higher Power. For a lot of us, however, “God” is a troublesome word. We may doubt the existence of any sort of Power greater than ourselves. Or we may remember uncomfortable experiences with religion and shy away from “the God stuff.”

Starting over in recovery means we can start over in our spiritual life, too. If we're not comfortable with what we learned when we were growing up, we can try a different approach to our spirituality. We don't have to understand everything all at once or find the answers to all our questions right away. Sometimes it's enough just to know that other NA members believe and that their belief helps keep them clean.

––––=––––

Just for today: All I have to know right now about my Higher Power is that it is the Power that helps keep me clean.

Post edited by: sewnup, at: 04/23/2012 06:44 AM


04/24/2012 12:26 PM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 24

Twelve Steps of life

“Through abstinence and through working the Twelve Steps of Narcotics Anonymous, our lives have become useful.”

Basic Text, p. 8

––––=––––

Before coming to Narcotics Anonymous, our lives were centered around using. For the most part, we had very little energy left over for jobs, relationships, or other activities. We served only our addiction.

The Twelve Steps of Narcotics Anonymous provide a simple way to turn our lives around. We start by staying clean, a day at a time. When our energy is no longer channeled into our addiction, we find that we have the energy to pursue other interests. As we grow in recovery, we become able to sustain healthy relationships. We become trustworthy employees. Hobbies and recreation seem more inviting. Through participation in Narcotics Anonymous, we help others.

Narcotics Anonymous does not promise us that we will find good jobs, loving relationships, or a fulfilling life. But when we work the Twelve Steps to the best of our ability, we find that we can become the type of people who are capable of finding employment, sustaining loving relationships, and helping others. We stop serving our disease, and begin serving God and others. The Twelve Steps are the key to transforming our lives.

––––=––––

Just for today: I will have the wisdom to use the Twelve Steps in my life, and the courage to grow in my recovery. I will practice my program to become a responsible, productive member of society.


04/25/2012 10:45 AM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 25

Embracing reality

“Recovery is a reality for us today.”

Basic Text, p. 101

––––=––––

Pain and misery were realities in our using lives. We were unwilling either to accept our living situation or to change what was unacceptable in our lives. We attempted to escape life's pain by taking drugs, but using only compounded our troubles. Our altered sense of reality became a nightmare.

Through living the program of Narcotics Anonymous, we learn that our dreams can replace our nightmares. We grow and change. We acquire the freedom of choice. We are able to give and receive love. We can share honestly about ourselves, no longer magnifying or minimizing the truth. We accept the challenges real life offers us, facing them in a mature, responsible way.

Although recovery does not give us immunity from the realities of life, in the NA Fellowship we can find the support, genuine care, and concern we need to face those realities. We need never hide from reality by using drugs again, for our unity with other recovering addicts gives us strength. Today, the support, the care, and the empathy of recovery give us a clean, clear window through which to view, experience, and appreciate reality as it is.

––––=––––

Just for today: A gift of my recovery is living and enjoying life as it truly is. Today, I will embrace reality


04/26/2012 06:23 AM
sewnup
sewnup  
Posts: 707
Senior Member

April 26-Self-acceptance

“The most effective means of achieving self-acceptance is through applying the Twelve Steps of recovery.”--IP No. 19, Self-Acceptance

––––=––––

Most of us came to Narcotics Anonymous without much self-acceptance. We looked at the havoc we had wreaked in our active addiction, and we loathed ourselves. We had difficulty accepting our past and the self-image produced by it.

Self-acceptance comes more quickly when we first accept that we have a disease called addiction, because it's easier to accept ourselves as sick people than as bad people. And the easier it is to accept ourselves, the easier it becomes to accept responsibility for ourselves.

We achieve self-acceptance through the process of ongoing recovery. Working the Twelve Steps of Narcotics Anonymous teaches us to accept ourselves and our lives. Spiritual principles like surrender, honesty, faith, and humility help relieve us of the burden of our past mistakes. Our attitude changes with the application of these principles in our daily lives. Self-acceptance grows as we grow in recovery.

––––=––––

Just for today: Self-acceptance is a process set in motion by the Twelve Steps. Today, I will trust the process, practice the steps, and learn to better accept myself.

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