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04/20/2011 01:46 AM

Symptoms of Fungal Exposure (Mycotoxicosis)

Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
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Symptoms of Fungal Exposure (Mycotoxicosis)

Susan Lillard-Roberts

Mold toxicity is often the end result with constant exposure to mold of a toxic substance.

A common misconception among allergists who are untrained in this type of toxicity levels in humans, which is technically not their area of expertise unless they have trained specifically in environmental medicine with their background in immunology, is to do general allergen testing.

Most tests usually result in an unequivocal result, a 2+ or less.

This induces some physicians to order allergy shots, regardless.

These shots are absolutely worthless (and could possibly be harmful) to a person who has been heavily exposed to these mycotoxins as they are already in a state of toxicity.

If anything, this could exacerbate the problem.

Because many doctors are not trained in this field, they may try to "guess" at a diagnosis.

In laymen's terms, molds produce mycotoxins. These substances, although unseen by the naked eye, are ingested and then enter the body through the skin, mucous and airways.

Once ingested, mold has the requirements to colonize and spread.

In doing this, it can compromise the immune system and damage everyday processes of the body.

Mold and yeast are interchangeable only in their dimorphic state, which is often a big misconception, although both are fungi.

There has been a theory of a connection between Autism Spectrum Disorder onset and Candida Albicans in the body.

New studies are being conducted during the first quarter of 2006. Updates will follow.

Fungi, which include yeasts, moulds, smuts and mushrooms, are responsible for causing four types of mycotic (fungal) disease:

1. Hypersensitivity - an allergic reaction to moulds and spores;

2. Mycotoxicosis - poisoning by food products contaminated by fungi

3. Mycetismus - the ingestion of preformed toxin (toadstool poisoning)

4. Infection (systemic) - (Mycotoxicosis; the subject below)

The following are a list of the most common symptoms of fungal exposure (bear in mind, people never fit all of below criteria).

Most people with some forms of Mycotoxicosis meet at least 8 (recent symptoms) of the following criteria:

Fibromyalgia/mps (and several correlated symptoms)

Respiratory distress, coughing, sneezing, sinusitis

Difficulty swallowing, choking, spitting up (vomiting) mucous

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

Burning in the throat and lungs (similar to acid reflux and often misdiagnosed as such)

Asthmatic signs; wheezing, shortness in breath, coughing, burning in lungs, etc.

Irritable bowel syndrome, nausea, diarrhea, sharp abdominal pains, stomach lesions

Bladder, liver, spleen, or kidney pain

Dark or painful urine

Dirt-like taste in mouth, coated tongue

Food allergies/leaky gut syndrome/altered immunity

Memory loss; brain fog, slurred speech, occasionally leading to dementia

Vision problems

Swollen lymph nodes

Large boils on neck (often a sign of anaphylaxis)

Yellowing of nails, ridges, or white marks under nail

Thyroid irregularities, sometimes leading to complete dysfunction; adrenal problems

Headaches

Anxiety/depression, heart palpitations - confusion,

PTSD

Extreme blood pressure, cholesterol, or triglycerides irregularities

Ringing in ears, balance problems (very common), dizziness, loss of hearing (aspergillus niger)

Chronic fatigue (also included under this classification directional confusion)

Intermittent face flushing; almost always systemic,

Called the Mylar Flush (neurological))

Night head sweats, and drooling while sleeping, profuse sweating

Multiple chemical sensitivity; only upon exposure to Stachybotrys and Chaetomium

Nose bleeds (stachybotrys)

Bruising/scarring easily; rash or hives, bloody lesions all over the skin (Often systemic, see images; skin)

Reproductive system complications; infertility, changes in menstrual cycles, miscarriage

Sudden weight changes (Detoxifier genotypes tend to gain weight, non-detoxifier genotypes tend to lose weight)

Cancer

Hair loss, very brittle nails, temporary loss of fingerprints (in rare cases)

Joint/muscle stiffness and pain

Irregular heart beat/heart attack

Seizures, inadvertent body jerking, twitching, inadvertent facial movements or numbness in face

Hypersensitivity when re-exposed to molds, which can lead to anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis upon re-exposure to mycotoxin producing molds

Death, in extreme cases

Note: despite inaccurate and misleading reports by theorists regarding immuno-compromised, babies, and the elderly being more susceptible, this is a big misconception as exposure to the T-2 mycotoxins found in many types of current indoor molds will poison anyone in time; no one is immune.

The reason for this conflicting information is that studies have never been conducted to prove this.

If so called experts are going to make such a broad and misleading statement, they may as well say that this same category of people is more susceptible to SARS, West Nile Virus, AIDS, and cancer.

The T-2 mycotoxins found in many of these molds are the exact same T-2 mycotoxins that have killed widespread groups of innocent people with Yellow Rain, a biological warfare agent.

Different mold species can have varying health effects, but it is important to remember that any excessive mold growth needs to be taken care of, regardless of the species.

Any excessive mold growth can lead to increased allergies, toxicity, and house/building structural problems.

Aspergillus spp

Aspergillus is the most common genus of fungi in our environment with more than 160 different species of mold.

Sixteen of these species have been documented as causing human disease.

Aspergillosis is now the 2nd most common fungal infection requiring hospitalization in the United States.

Exposure to aspergillus can often cause skin rashes and hair loss.

Many people seek relief by taking 5,000 mcg. of biotin per day with 3,500 mgs. of MSM.

Beware, many vitamins and supplements are made with the aspergillus fermentation process or other types of fungi that the vitamin manufacturers fail to reveal.

For a healthy source of vitamins with no fungi, please view www.mold-help.biz ;

the world's first nutricutical website for providing relief from fungal exposure.

The site is in its initial stages at the moment, but by February 1, it will be an entire source for healthier eating and nutritional supplements related to fungal disease.

Please register on the site if you would like an update when the Mold-Help Solutions Source is ready to assist.

Aspergillus fumigatus.

The most encountered species causing infection. It is seen abundantly in decomposing organic material, such as self-heating compost piles, since it readily grows at temperatures up to 55 C.

People who handle contaminated material often develop hypersensitivity to the spores of Aspergillus and may suffer severe allergic reactions upon exposure.

Aspergillus flavus. The 2nd most encountered fungi in cases of Aspergillus infection. It is also known to produce the mycotoxin aflatoxin, one of the most potent carcinogens known to man.

In the 1960s, 100,000 turkey poults in Great Britain died from ingesting contaminated feed.

Most countries have established levels for aflatoxin in food. However, the risks associated with airborne exposure are not adequately studied and no exposure standards exist.

Aspergillus niger.

The 3rd most common Aspergillus fungi associated with disease and the most common of any Aspergillus species in nature due to it's ability to grow on a wide variety of substrates.

This species may cause a “fungal ball”, which is a condition where the fungus actively proliferates in the human lung, forming a ball.

It does so without invading the lung tissue. It has also been linked to hearing problems including tinnitus and hearing loss.

Aspergillus Versicolor.

The most common species of Aspergillus. Among skin problems and hair loss, this fungus has been linked to severe abdominal pain, acid reflux, and vomiting.

Stachybotrys chartarum (atra) and Chaetomium globosum

This group of molds can thrive on water damaged, cellulose-rich material in buildings such as sheet rock, paper, ceiling tiles, insulation backing, wallpaper, etc.

In the majority of cases where Stachybotrys is found indoors, water damage has gone unnoticed or ignored since it requires extended periods of time with increased levels of moisture for growth to occur.

Stachybotrys is usually black and slimy in appearance.

Events of water intrusion that are addressed quickly tends to support the growth of more xerophilic fungi such as Penicillium and Aspergillus.

Stachybotrys is another fungi that has the ability to produce mycotoxins, ones that are extremely toxic, suspected carcinogens, and immunosuppressive.

Exposure to these mycotoxins can result through inhalation, ingestion, and dermal exposure.

Symptoms of exposure include

dermatitis, memory loss, balance issues, acid reflux, cough, rhinitis, nose bleeds, cold and flu-like symptoms, headache, bleeding lungs, general malaise, internal lesions, seizures, and fever.

Long term exposure has shown that Stachybotrys and Chaetomium can destroy the myelin sheath, leading to autoimmune disease.

These are the only two fungi that can also be linked MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivity).

There is much confusion about Chaetomium, as it can be worse than Stachybotrys since it is so difficult to eradicate.

Our mycologist tells us that it is like cast iron while Stachybotrys is easier.

Cladosporium spp.

These genera of mold are pigmented dark green to black in the front, and black on the reverse with a velvety to powdery texture.

One of the most commonly isolated from indoor and outdoor air,

Cladosporium spp. are found on

decaying plants, woody plants, food, straw, soil, paint, textiles, and the surface of fiberglass duct liner in the interior of supply ducts.

There are over 30 species in the Cladosporium genus.

The most common are C. elatum, C. herbarum, C. sphaerospermum, and C. cladosporioides.

These fungi are the causative agents of skin lesions, keratitis, nail fungus, sinusitis, asthma, and pulmonary infections.

Acute symptoms of exposure to Cladosporium are edema and bronchiospasms, and chronic exposure may lead to pulmonary emphysema. More commonly, it is a more causative factor for intrinsic asthma.

Fusarium spp.

A common soil fungus and inhabitant on a wide array of plants, this fungi is often found in humidifiers and has been isolated from water-damaged carpets and a variety of other building materials.

Human exposure may occur through ingestion of contaminated grains and possibly through the inhalation of spores.

Fusarium spp. are frequently involved with eye, skin, and nail infections.

More severely it can produce hemorrhagic syndrome (alimentary toxic aleukia) in humans which is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis, and extensive internal bleeding.

Several species can produce the trichothecene toxins which target the circulatory, alimentary, skin, and nervous systems.

Vomitoxin is one such tricothecene mycotoxin that has been associated with outbreaks of acute gastrointestinal illness in humans.

Zearalenone is another mycotoxin produced by Fusarium.

It is similar in structure to the female sex hormone estrogen and targets the reproductive organs.

Penicillium spp.

These fungi are commonly found in soil, food, cellulose, grains, paint, carpet, wallpaper, interior fiberglass duct insulation, and decaying vegetation.

Penicillium may cause hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asthma, and allergic alveolitis in susceptible individuals.

The genus Penicillium has several species.

The most common ones include Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium marneffei, and Penicillium purpurogenum.

This fungi has been isolated from patients with keratitis, ear infections, pneumonia, endocarditis, peritonitis, and urinary tract infections.

Penicillium infections are most commonly exhibited in immunosuppressed individuals.

For example, P. marneffei is a fungus abundant in Southeast Asia that typically infects patients with AIDS in this area.

Infection with P.marneffei is acquired via inhalation and initially results in a pulmonary infection and then spreads to other areas of the body (lymphatic system, liver, spleen, and bones), and is often fatal.

An indication of infection is the appearance of papules that resemble acne on the face, trunk, and extremities.

Penicillim spp. do have the ability to produce mycotoxins.

The mycotoxin known as Ochratoxin A, which is nephrotoxic and carcinogenic, may be produced by Penicillium verrucosum.

Verrucosidin is another mycotoxin produced by this fungus that exhibits neurotoxity.

Penicillic acid is another mycotoxin that is nephrotoxic (causes kidney and liver damage).

Permanent problems sometimes associated with fungal exposure after treatment:

Balance

Short term memory Hearing

Sight

See Associated Illnesses after Fungal Exposure

Note: Many of these symptoms could also be the onset of other illnesses, as well, and only a skilled physician is diagnosed to give you a full and qualified diagnosis.

Additionally, it is important to know that much of these symptoms will deplete after vacating the building. Diet, nutrition, and medical assistance are extremely important.

[return to mold-survivor menu]

Go to Mold Help Nutricuticals

Go to Mold Help Resources

References

Ammann, Harriet, Is indoor mold contamination a threat to health?

Auger PL, Gourdeau P, Miller D, "Clinical experience with patients suffering from a chronic fatigue-like syndrome and repeated upper respiratory infections in relation to airborne molds". Am. J. of Indust. Medicine 1994; 25:41-42

Bennett, J. W., Klich, M. (2003). Mycotoxins. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 16: 497-516 [Abstract] [Full Text]

Bisby GR., 1943 Stachybotrys Trans Brit Mycol Soc 26:133-143

Bitnum A, Nosal R. 1999. Stachybotrys chartarum (atra) contamination of the indoor environment: health implications. Pediatric Child Health. 4(2):125-129.

Brautbar, Nachman 2002 Toxic molds - The killer within us: Indoor molds and their symptoms

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness of unknown etiology associated with eating burritos, United States, October 1997October 1998. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1999;48:210-213. [Medline]

Corrier DE. "Mycotoxicosis: mechanism of immunosuppression". Vet Immunol Immunopathol 1991; 30:73-87

Dearborn DG, Yike I, Sorenson WG, Miller MJ, Etzel RA., 1999 Overview of investigations into pulmonary hemorrhage among infants in Cleveland, Ohio Env Health Persp 107Dizzy495-S499

Etzel, Ruth, J.A.M.A.; mycotoxins - linking evidence and experience

Flannigan B, Miller JD., 1994 Health implications of fungi in indoor environments—An overview In: Samson RA, Flannigan B, Flannigan ME, Verhoeff AP, Adan OCG, eds. Health implications of fungi in indoor air environment. 1th ed. Elsevier, Amsterdam. p 3–26

Flannigan B, McCabe EM, McGarry F. "Allergenic and toxigenic micro-organisms in houses". J Appl Bact Symp (Suppl) 1991; 70:61S-73S

Forgacs J, Carll WT., 1962 Mycotoxicosis Adv Vet Sci 7:273-293

Gray, Dr. Michael 2001 Mold, mycotoxins and Human Health

Gray, Dr. Michael July 2003 Interview

Hodgson MG, Morey P, Leung WY. Building-associated pulmonary disease from exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum and Aspergillus versicolor. J Occup Enivron Med. 1998;40:241-249

Horner WE, Helbling A, Salvaggio JE, Lehrer SB. Fungal allergens. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1995;8(2):161-179

Human health effects of indoor mycotoxin exposure in fungi-contaminated indoor environments

Jarvis BB. Mycotoxins--an overview. In: Ownby CA, Odell GV (eds). Natural Toxins. New York, NY: Pergamon Press, 1988:17-29.

Johanning E, Biagini RE, Hull D, Morey PR, Jarvis BB, Landsbergis P., 1996 Health and immunology study following exposure to toxigenic fungi (Stachybotrys chartarum) in a water-damaged office environment Int Arch Occup Health 68:207-218

Johanning E, Landsbergis P, Gareis M, Yang CS, Olmsted E. Clinical experience and results of a sentinel health investigation related to indoor fungal exposure. Environ Health Perspect. 1999;107(3):489-494

Johanning E, Morey PR, Jarvis BB. "Clinical Epidemiological Investigation of Health Effects caused by Stachybotrys Atra Building Contamination", Proceedings of Indoor Air, 1993; Vol. 1: 225-230

Jong SC, Davis EE., 1976 Contribution to the knowledge of Stachybotrys and Memnoniella in culture Mycotoxin 3:409-485

Kozak PP, Gallup J, Cummins LH, Gillman SA. Endogenous mold exposure: environmental risk to atopic and nonatopic patients. In: Gammage RB, Kay SV (eds). Indoor Air and Human Health. Chelsea, Mich: Lewis Publishers; 1985:149-170

Marinkovich, Vincent, Sorenson, S.G., Gordon, Wayne A.,Johanning, Eckardt,Haddad, Lisa, Khaboshany, A, Omidi, A, Morsali,S.M., Craner, J.,Stetzenbach, Linda, D., Berek L, Petri IB, Mesterhazy A A, Teren J, Molnar J., Withanage GS, Murata H, Koyama T, Ishiwata I., Pitt JI., Wild CP, Turner PC., Massey TE, Smith GB, Tam AS, Georggiett OC, Muino JC, Montrull H, Brizuela N, Avalos S, Gomez RM., S. Bernardini, G. Falck, A. Hirvonen, H. Järventaus, J. Tuimala, Samson, Robert, A., Kari Reijula, Nolard, nicole, Anna-Liisa Pasanen, Johanning, Eckardt, Landsbergis, Paul, Etzel, Ruth A, Dearborn, Dorr, Ammann, Harriet, Bünger, J., Müller, M., Stalder, K., Hallier E., Medical abstracts on medical aspects of fungal exposure from around the world

Mayo Clinic on mold exposure

Peltola J, Anderson MA, Raimo M, Mussalo-Rauhamaa H, Salkinoja-Salonen M., 1999 Membrane toxic substances in water-damaged construction materials and fungal pure cultures In: Johanning E. Bioaerosols, Fungi, Mycotoxins: Health effects, Assessment, Prevention and Control 1. New York: Eastern New York Occupational & Environmental Health Center. p 432–443

Peraica, M.; Radic, B.; Lucic, A.; Pavlovic, M. , September 1, 1999, Diseases Caused by Molds in Humans, Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Reshetilova TA, Soloveva TF, Baskunov BP, Kozlovskii AG., 1992 Investigation of alkaloid formation by certain species of fungi of the Penicillium genus Mikrobiologiya 61:873-879

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The information here does not reflect professional advice and is not intended to supersede the professional advice of others.

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Post edited by: Bettyg, at: 04/20/2011 02:07 AM

Reply

04/26/2011 10:48 PM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

GIGI'S DETAILED POST ON MOLD; she's the guru on mold on lymenet; MANY conversations below.

i don't have time to edit/delete stuff; you can read it as is or go the link right below this statement. eventually another day when i have time, i'll come back.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi? ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=106420;p=0

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-19-2011 08:41 AM

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Yes, cholestyramine (CSM), nizoral/cromolyn nasal spray...

You have to get away from the exposure!

I didn't think my home was a problem, so I did an ERMI test to rule it out and found out that my home is highly toxic with carcinogenic molds.

http://mycometrics.com/

We are now staying in a motel until the proper remediation can be done.

http://www.moldremedy.biz

DO NOT RUN OZONE!

I have recently learned that ozone crystallizes the mycotoxins that mold releases! If you have been exposed to mold and you breathe ozone, you are causing more harm than good.

Mold causes allergies...

GROWING mold releases mycotoxins that can kill you. If you keep the humidity below 50%, mold cannot grow.

DO NOT CLEAN MOLD WITH BLEACH.

Bleach and mycotoxins mix and create deadly gas. Plus, bleach does not kill mold... AMMONIA DOES!

I have been washing clothes with 2 cups ammonia.

Clean the house with a solution of 1 cup ammonia to 1 gallon of water.

**disclaimer** I am not a doctor or a mold expert. I have read a couple of books and I am dealing with my own mold problems.

~Heather

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Posts: 245 | From New York | Registered: Jan 2011 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-19-2011 09:26 AM

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I did the mycometrics ERMI test which came back sky high. On a scale of -10 to 20 - our house is a 20.3. According to the book "Surviving Mold" if you are susceptible to mold illness you should not live in a house that tests higher than 0-1 on this ERMI scale.

I sent the test to "The Environmental Specialists" - Chrissy and Shane Mann and they will be at my house at noon today to do further testing and advise.

Their first advice was GET OUT OF THE HOUSE!

One of the deadliest molds is aspergillus niger and our count is very high in this.

I will have more info later on today.

I am looking for a good HEPA vacuum as I can no longer use my Oreck... I have no rugs and it does not work well on tile and hard wood.

If anyone has a canister type vacuum with a HEPA filter that they can recommend, I would appreciate it!

***********************

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-19-2011 11:11 AM

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A naturopath found aspergillus niger in my darkfield blood back in '03. Probably something the nasty ticks carry in their bodies and share too? Supposedly I've been treated with my rife?

We are in process of removing shower doors that caused our shower wall to have a mold issue on tile and gout.

Bleach makes me ill. I only use it watered down and I'm masked, house is open and aired out maybe 3 times a year.

I use hydrogen peroxide in spray bottle and have sprayed this shower down often.

Doors are outta here. I spray all mold down several times with peroxide and now I'm removing the old caulk and some molding grout.

I keep wetting down the airs layer by layer. Trusty masks, glasses. My husband thinks I'm a nut case.

You should of heard the fight that happened when he removed the doors and stepped into mold with his shoes and thought he was going to walk through our house. Not pretty!

I made him spray down his shoes and his body after this job. I stayed out of the BR, except to peek in and make sure he was spraying peroxide as he went.

Today I'm using my HEPA filter vacuum and the bag will be in the trash with all this dust mold.

Shower curtain going up. It can be thrown in washer. It can be held back while walk in air dries.

Oh yeah, I'm using my rife machine to run mold freqs to help knock the spores down.

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GiGi

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 259

posted 04-19-2011 01:50 PM

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Dr. K. told me that high doses of chlorella, 30-40 tablets 3x per day are the best treatment.

And fixing the problems in the house.

************************************

GiGi

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 259

posted 04-19-2011 07:09 PM

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If you are talking cholestyramine - I don't think it has any nutritional value. In fact it causes some substances that the body needs to be not absorbed.

Chlorella is a perfect food delivering besides many others many aminos that are probably missing in a large part of the Lyme/toxic metal/mold/parasite population.

Look up some of my old posts on chlorella. It's is loaded with the best God gave us. And if you are missing major nutrients, i.e. incomplete amino acid supplies, missing and depleted minerals, detoxing is not possible. Not possible. It takes a number of factors to get as sick as many of us are or were. Giving the body the necessary amunition is one way to make progress. Cholestyramine is not one to build up the nutritional base.

****************

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-20-2011 08:53 AM

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quote:

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Originally posted by map1131:

Bleach makes me ill. I only use it watered down and I'm masked, house is open and aired out maybe 3 times a year.

I use hydrogen peroxide in spray bottle and have sprayed this shower down often.

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A lot of people clean mold with bleach. Up until last week, I would thought to use bleach to clean up mold!

I found a lot of mold in my house when I did an ERMI test... so I got an independent inspector to do testing in my house. His wife (who is a sweetheart told me that bleach an mold combined create Volatile Organic Compounds(VOC's)

From American Air & Water:

quote:

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Should I use bleach to clean mold?

No. Bleach combined with certain mycotoxins and VOC's (Volatile Organic Compounds), can create neurotoxins and brain tumors. OSHA does not recommend using bleach in mold remediation. Ammonia dissolves some molds and neutralizes the mycotoxins. It is important to follow safety guidelines when using cleaners to remove molds...

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Their website:

http://www.americanairandwater.com

Pam- this is why bleach makes you ill.

And Hydrogen peroxide = bleach!

Use ammonia, not bleach. If you have a large area that is mold contaminated, have the mold cleaned by a professional! Mold spreads quickly and most people do not know how to contain a clean area to remediate a home correctly!

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-20-2011 09:04 AM

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GiGi - it looks like you don't take PM's or I would have asked you this privately.

Could you edit the name of the post to be MOLD without the spaces?

The way it is now M O L D... may get more attention whenn people SEE it... but they may not be able to find it when it drops off the first page!

A lot of time I use the "subject only" feature of the search to find threads about what I am researching. This is how I get a lot of my information about what is working for people!

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-20-2011 11:34 AM

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I'm going to read up on peroxide=bleach. I don't believe so. Peroxide is suppose to be the healthy choice.

I cannot do ammonia. I'm chemically sensitive. I only use baking soda, white vinegar, apple cider vinegar and peroxide to clean my house.

Just thinking about ammonia makes my head swim. No can do.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-20-2011 11:43 AM

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mom, Gigi has been posting about mold for us for years here. Put mold in search engine with Gigi member# and you will see.....

She's been trying to get some people attention on this issue for years. Many people esp new member don't realize they need to be reading these types of threads.

Some people are only looking for the name of the magic pill?

All of our bodies were overly toxic from our lives before we were bite by the BUG?

The only way to eliminate these is one by one. It's not easy and it takes time. We live in a very toxic world.

Lyme & co is just the straw that's breaking our backs.

Don't do title only search. With Gigi thread here should be one listed because mold is in the body of post. Also Gigi posts her email address all the time here. I wouldn't suggest to Gigi to change the way she did this.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

desertwind

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 25256

posted 04-20-2011 12:51 PM

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I am actually having a mold specialist come to my house in a couple of days to check out the funky black stuff and fungus I found in my attic over the weekend - old home built in the 1700's...

That old fiber glass insulation is another big toxic issue and loves mold.

I would never attempt to remediate anything mold related myself.

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Posts: 185 | From tick land | Registered: Apr 2010 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-20-2011 06:56 PM

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Momlyme, where is the mold in your house? Is it visible?

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-20-2011 08:40 PM

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The ERMI test has you vacuum 2 18 square foot areas in your house. One in your living area and one in your bedroom. That's what I did.

I have no visible mold and no smell of mold.

I was doing the test to rule out my house as the problem and I intended to move on to my ex-husband's house as the actual problem... little did I know my house was very toxic.

More on bleach creating Volatile Organic Compounds

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18441786

http://www.moldremedy.biz/55352.html

I may be wrong about hydrogen peroxide = bleach... I always thought it was the same thing. When we were teenagers, we used it to 'bleach' our hair.

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

Cass A

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 11134

posted 04-21-2011 03:37 AM

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Bleach as a cleaner usually means Chlorine bleach. Hydrogen Peroxide "bleaches"--meaning takes the color out of something. However, its chemical action is quite different from chlorine bleach.

Whether or not hydrogen peroxide would work to kill mold has not been answered on this thread.

Hydrogen peroxide does kill bacteria when used topically on cuts, for example.

Best,

Cass A

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Posts: 1060 | From Thousand Oaks, CA | Registered: Feb 2007 | IP: Logged |

chaps

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 25286

posted 04-21-2011 08:24 AM

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How come no one has mentioned the propolis air diffuser? Isn't that supposed to be one of the best ways to get it out of the air?

Even in houses with no water intrusion problems, the air handler in the central air conditioning system can be a source of mold because there is always moisture there. Then you're distributing the air that comes out of it all over the house.

If mold can't grow in less than 50% humidity and GROWING mold is what causes the trouble, then why isn't the solution to just get a big dehumidifier and keep it below 50%?

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-chaps

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Posts: 401 | From Florida | Registered: Apr 2010 | IP: Logged |

chaps

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 25286

posted 04-21-2011 08:34 AM

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When you read the list of symptoms on the site to which GiGi linked, many of these symptoms are the same symptoms of Lyme and coinfections.

So here we go. More money for lab tests that are unreliable. Where does this craziness end?

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-chaps

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Posts: 401 | From Florida | Registered: Apr 2010 | IP: Logged |

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-21-2011 10:13 AM

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IMO, LymeMom, if you have that much mold you have to move. Remediating is expensive and will not take care of the problem, it is probably throughout the wall cavities.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-21-2011 11:08 AM

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OMG. We had some water damage in our house when we bought it that has been fixed but I wonder if there is a hidden problem. I have been icredibly sensitive to mold lately.

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

Abxnomore

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 18936

posted 04-21-2011 11:14 AM

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What are the good labs to use to test for mold in the body, no in your residence, and what tests should be run. I know its a mycotoxin.

Anyone know?

Thanks.

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Please stop by "Seeking a Doctor" as often as you can. LLMD lists for a particular state cannot replace first-hand experience. We need everyone's help to respond to posts in "Seeking" to better help those in need. Thank you much. Wink

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Posts: 3467 | From Lyme Zone | Registered: Jan 2009 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-21-2011 11:20 AM

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No peroxide does not remove the small spots of mold on my caulk or grout in my walk-in shower like bleach.

The peroxide is in spray bottle diluted by 1/3 with water. It helps keep the mold down from reproducing quicker. It does not whiten my caulk like bleach. Bleach just doesn't come out, but rarely.

I use peroxide daily after I take shower to mist. Removing those doors will allow me to leave shower curtain open for air drying.

But I limit my bleach use, diluted by half with water because I can't stand the smell and my chemical sentitivies are real problem.

I hate perfume. If someone sits down beside me or anywhere near me at an event, I'm sick almost immediately. My head becomes foggy (ier) and I have an odd headache.

I have to detox myself in order to get these chemicals out of my system.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

tickssuck

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 15388

posted 04-21-2011 11:21 AM

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I agree with Chaps. This is just exhausting me....I would love to get well and feel I have no idea how to get there. Information overload and LLMD is "shooting in the dark," so to speak, hoping something will work. I have seen 2 LLMD's and am seeing a new one in a couple of weeks, very well-respected etc. However, I still don't expect any clear answers for how to get my neurological system in order. Sorry to be a bummer; but, it is how I feel right now. Sigh. TS

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Posts: 418 | From West Coast | Registered: May 2008 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-21-2011 11:33 AM

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tickssuck, I agree with your user name. Do one thing at a time. As you read and research and you see something that you use or do that could be adding to your toxic body....

Write it down. Keep a page of to do that might make a difference. We are too ill to change our world and do things physically or mentally exhausting.

One thing at a time. I pull notes out of my lyme folder that been growing for 12 yrs. Stuff I forgot I had read or made not of.

Sometimes it's an OMG moment....I need this supp now, I need to see this chiro now, I need to eliminate my teflon pans now.

Your LLMD is only going to give abx to kill bacteria. If you are lucky he/she will be alternative thinking doc like mine was and get you reading info to help you detox.

My LLMD was about cleaning up toxic home, body, diet, supps to try, bodywork to have done to eliminate toxins.

There is not a magic pill. It is a long process to get over this. It's years of toxic micro organism that are in your body giving the bad guys a comfortable enviroment in which to control.

Please don't get discouraged. One step, one idea at a time. A lyme brain can't remember when we took our last meds. lol That's why it's good to have binder to write things to yourself.

Ticks Suck!

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

Abxnomore

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 18936

posted 04-21-2011 11:41 AM

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Anyone know the good labs to test for mold in the blood, mycotoxins?

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Please stop by "Seeking a Doctor" as often as you can. LLMD lists for a particular state cannot replace first-hand experience. We need everyone's help to respond to posts in "Seeking" to better help those in need. Thank you much. Wink

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Posts: 3467 | From Lyme Zone | Registered: Jan 2009 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-21-2011 11:53 AM

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I can't live like this. Thinking about every possible thing that can be contributing to my illness. It's not that I don't believe that all these things are contributing, because I do believe it, it's that I am too overwhelmed to think about every thing and sort it all out. It seems impossible.

And, financially I can't solve all the problems like possible mold in my house or moving. We heat our house with wood and I think that possible mold on the wood could be part of my problem but we can't afford to heat with anything but wood. I am so burnt out with all of this b/c I don't have the power or means to change any of it. I am also tired of keeping track of everything/writing everything down and thinking so much about everything. It is so overwhelming and no way to live. That being said though, doing just that has led to some aha moments for me. So, I don't know what point I'm trying to get at. Just venting and frustrated.

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

BackinStOlaf

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 23725

posted 04-21-2011 12:31 PM

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tickled- I feel the EXACT same way. Way too overwhelming

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First Symptom 9/09

Multiple docs, negative Labcorp test

LLMD: 1/10

Positive Igenex/CDC test

Treatment 2/10

2/10-8/10 Amox, ceftin, zith, flagyl

Currently: Mepron, Zith and Art for suspected Babs. Severe air hunger

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Posts: 959 | From New York, New York | Registered: Dec 2009 | IP: Logged |

skies

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 28064

posted 04-21-2011 12:46 PM

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tickled1--I also TOTALLY agree with you and feel exactly the same way. So frustrating, so depressing, so finanacially draining... It makes me want to scream.

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"The simple things can get you through the hardest times."

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Posts: 144 | From Connecticut | Registered: Sep 2010 | IP: Logged |

Tammy N.

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 26835

posted 04-21-2011 01:40 PM

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Abxnomore - check out this recent thread: http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/ 106475?#000018

I listed out the tests Dr. S. recommends, plus there's a lot of other good info in this thread.

I agree with everyone, this is overwhelming at times. And costly!

Tammy

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Posts: 724 | From NJ | Registered: Jul 2010 | IP: Logged |

seekhelp

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 15067

posted 04-21-2011 11:08 PM

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Tickled, I agree. I'm at my wits end with this stuff. Your imagination can get the best of you when all you read on Lymenet is endless reasons for illness like mold, EMF, TBIs, metals, KPU and 100 other things. Where's it stop? When's the testing stop?

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Posts: 6626 | From The 5th Dimension - The Twilight Zone | Registered: Mar 2008 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-22-2011 10:03 AM

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Ticked, I don't think you have any choice. This is your life. There is a ton of work to be done on your part.

It's up to you to fix you and make you better. There is no magic doctor with no magic pill.

I'm sorry.....this is real and you need to take control of your health today. You are in charge of your health and well being. Not a doctor, not anybody on here can fix YOU, it's all in you hands how you want to live the rest of your life.

Can't won't do anything. Sorry to be so blunt. I've been fighting since 98-99 and I'm better. Not cured better. Everything that comes my way....I will find a way to get it under control with a little help from my friends and my PCP.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-22-2011 10:08 AM

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To others....what is on here is info for you to consider for your living area. Mold in home can make people have COPD, sleep apnea, you name it.

You don't have to have a test done for every little thing. I don't have that kind of money and I know most of you don't have that money.

You need to pick and choose which areas of your life, home, enviro, family, friends etc need to be cleaned up or at least minimal in your life.

Yes, family can be toxic. I don't need a test for this....my father is toxic to me! I limit being around him.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-22-2011 10:22 AM

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chaps - I have the propolis diffuser and am running it 24 hours.

Part of the independent inspection I just had done was to measure the humidity. Our humidity is below the 50% mark. Although growing mold is producing more mycotoxins, dead mold still is toxic and should not be ignored.

The company I have chosen for remediation uses an organic compound that is a microbe that eats mold. Therefore it gets rid of 100% of the mold. There will still be things we need to throw out, at this point I have no attachments. I will throw out what I need to.

oxygenbabe - we have moved into a motel.

I believe the remediation company I chose will be able to make our home livable. They will advise on what to throw out and what we can keep.

One thing everyone must be aware of is cross-contamination. Moving is not an simple solution. You cannot take your things with you or you will also bring the mold with you.

I was also completely overwhelmed with all of this. I am doing what I have to do. My husband and I have discussed moving if remediation does not make our home livable. We are willing to do what it takes to get our family well.

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

lymeout

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 8045

posted 04-22-2011 03:17 PM

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My front-loading washer developed a moldy odor. When I treated with bleach, the mold got so bad that I reacted when I got near it! When I talked to the environmental hygienist who first tested our home about this, he said that the bleach kills all the bacteria which were keeping the mold in check. When I killed the bacteria, the mold grew out of control! He said to NEVER buy a front-loader. They cannot be constructed in a way that allows for total draining.

When you are dealing with mold in your home, you should not try to remediate yourself. If you wipe or cut an affected area, the spores become airborne. A reputable remediation company will establish a barrier around the affected area before they begin work.

Also, the gray stuff you see on your grout is not mold, it's mildew; and it is not harmful.

I'm glad to know about chlorella for detoxing. My daughter did the cholestyramine protocol years ago - it helped tremendously; But I don't think I could ever get her to do it again! It was tough!

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Posts: 421 | From Herndon, Virginia | Registered: Oct 2005 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-22-2011 05:40 PM

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My sister-in-law has a front loader and all her towels smell moldy, musty. This was all over the news about 6 mths ago.

There are websites to tell you how ro get that rim clean. I read it but didn't retain it. There was an answer and I don't think it was bleach?

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-22-2011 06:15 PM

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LymeMom, sorry to say you will not get rid of the mold. And btw it's mixed microorganisms as bacteria also give off harmful vocs. No matter what you remediate it has permeated the entire structure, in places you will never find, and relative humidity in wall cavities and certain areas can easily be higher than 50% even if the air is not. Do your research. You will spend a lot on remediation and you will still be exposed and if you are genetically predisposed to be sensitive, you will remain sick. You should remediate what is obvious for ethical reasons and then sell it, and throw out all upholstered furniture, mattresses, and probably clothing. Once you get away from it all, you'll know if you react around items from the house, whether they are salvageable or not.

Otherwise I personally think just live in the house and don't waste money on remediation. That will be cheaper even if you remain sick.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

4Seasons

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 14601

posted 04-23-2011 03:17 AM

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Last year our LLND (who uses ART) told me that she thought we had a mold problem in our house. I said "no, we don't have a mold problem."

She had us do the ERMI vacuum test (mycometrics.com) and tested my MSH blood level.

Yup, we had mold! Our dishwasher was leaking under our kitchen counter. (plus a few other minor problems).

Our first remediation attempt, on the cheap, didn't bring the ERMI levels down to acceptable levels, so we moved out and had it done properly by a certified remediation company.

I bought new flooring with a credit card that is interest free for 18 months and my husband is slowly laying the new floor and putting in new kitchen counter tops. We're converting our master bedroom into a studio rental so we can afford to pay our mortgage.

All our tests seem to confirm that we have dealt with all the mold issues. We wiped down every single thing in our house with borax and water, washed every article of clothing, vacuumed all the books. Whew!

Yes, it has been totally overwhelming, financially and emotionally, but better than continuing to pour money and energy into Lyme treatment that doesn't work.

In addition to Cholestyramine, my LLND has me doing a monthly liver/gallbladder flush (Moritz) to help get the mold biotoxins out. We also had to deal with sinus issues from the mold in both my daughter and myself.

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"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain."

Anonymous

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Posts: 393 | From California | Registered: Feb 2008 | IP: Logged |

Tammy N.

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 26835

posted 04-23-2011 10:36 AM

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oxygen - It's hard to imagine living with things as-is, constantly contributing to illness. It's like a (slow) death sentence. I don't think that's a good route. Isn't the goal to get mold under acceptable levels? Don't we all have some mold? For instance, if I was unknowingly living in a moldy house, then came over to your house for dinner (with spores on my clothes, shoes, etc.) now your house would have it also. Do you think, after some time, your house needs to be vacated also because the spores would take over there? I don't know enough about it (rather overwhelming in the learning of it all), but I would think to remediate as best as possible, then keep humidity under the control is the best we can do. Any other thoughts?

Where else can we go? Every house at one time or another gets an issue (leaky pipe, roof leak, etc.) that needs to be dealt with. Showering every day puts moisture into the air, and washing clothes, dishwasher, etc. No home is perfect, so where do we go where moisture is not an issue? Open a window and humidity often comes in.

Ack, this is difficult. We need to brainstorm on solutions.

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Posts: 724 | From NJ | Registered: Jul 2010 | IP: Logged |

chaps

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 25286

posted 04-23-2011 12:46 PM

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Wow, oxygenbabe!

quote:

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Otherwise I personally think just live in the house and don't waste money on remediation. That will be cheaper even if you remain sick.

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That's very interesting advice indeed, very interesting.

With that kind of outlook, I'm surprised that you're not telling everyone that it's impossible to be cured from Lyme and all of its issues, so we might as well just put guns to our heads and end the misery for ourselves and those around us.

You make it sound impossible to remediate mold and that just doesn't seem to make sense.

If you eliminate source of the mold, which is usually a place where water instrusion is occuring, then kill the mold in the structure, how can it possibly continue to proliferate?

In order to remediate mold, some companies have people vacate the house of people and pets (leaving furniture and all stuff there) and then do heated ozone treatments that penetrate walls and furnishings to kill all the mold in the structure.

If this is done, and the source is fixed, I don't see how mold can return.

Aside from that, even if conditions are favorable for mold growth inside the walls, but the mold is being eliminated in the breathing space with ultraviolet air cleaners or propolis vaporizers, how can mold continue to be a threat?

Selling the house and everything you own and moving to a brand spanking new house doesn't seem like a viable option for most people and seems a bit EXTREME.

Brand spanking new houses can have water leaks, too.

Since mold exists in outdoor air, it's impossible to totally escape mold altogether. There's always going to be some level of exposure.

Seems to me that addressing mold in the body and reducing exposure inside the home as much as possible should give a person a fighting chance.

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-chaps

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Posts: 401 | From Florida | Registered: Apr 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-23-2011 04:33 PM

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Well said chaps.

I agree.

The company I am using uses healthy microbes that are like probiotics to eat the mold. What is left is a gray dust. That is the microbe poop.

When the mold is gone the microbes stop eating and settle into wood to protect further mold growth.

Yes, we will address the areas where there is intrusion. Our porch, drainage under the porch and we have to do something with the tub. The kids don't close the shower curtain right.

When we get the report we are having done, we will know exactly what we have to do (I hope).

Books, cardboard, clothes, furniture, paperwork, pictures... these are the things that will have to be tossed.

The expert says they can save more now than they could last year and the tecnology keeps getting better.

I am hopeful... and a little scared of the unknown... I love my books. My grandmother's paintings.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back to the medical end of mold...

I have been getting veins that come to the surface -blue and swollen... then they kind of explode. It has happened in my hands and my feet.

Yesterday I got a bruise like a grapefruit at the back of my knee. No injury. Just a big black bruise.

I have been reading a book called "Are you moldy" and the author (LT) mentions this symptom.

I thought I would mention it in case anyone else gets this.

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

Tammy N.

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 26835

posted 04-23-2011 06:27 PM

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Heather - you don't think clothes can be saved? And photos? This concerns me.

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Posts: 724 | From NJ | Registered: Jul 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-23-2011 09:40 PM

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It concerns me too.

Maybe we can keep clothes and pictures. I don't know. Clothes can be washed with 2 cups of ammonia - twice. Scan pictures? I know he recommends scanning paperwork - like tax documents.

I am more concerned about books and art work.

I am going to go by what the expert says. I am hoping and praying that insurance will help us with this remediation.

Our policy says they only cover if it is in the walls. It's in the walls... mostly the walls surrounding my son's room. Guess why he is so sick??

I should be getting the report on Monday. Then I will know the next step. One day at a time.

Tomorrow is Easter and I have to find the Easter Bunny!

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~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-23-2011 11:00 PM

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Momlyme,

How were they able to determine it is in the walls?

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-23-2011 11:21 PM

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Wow, Heather. I hope it all goes well for you.

What a huge undertaking. I orginally thought I wanted to take my double shower down to the studs. That meant smashing out alot of tile that 95% of it looks good.

It was going to be so much money to spend. I'm hoping doing all new caulk and scraping away mold spores, removal of shower door is going to make me feel more comfortable about this shower?

I hope it's my fix. I also am planning to run the heck out of rife machine in this bathroom and kill off any remaining spores.

I remember our home owners policy making a change in policy about mold and black mold changes and not covering such and such.

I need to dig into this insurance change just to know for myself what insurance will do and not do. We've had torrential rains this spring.

Wind blew off one shingle and it just happened to be a shingle that was above a wall joist something and it leaked badly in one night and across the ceiling.

Poor roofing structure in our condo community is the norm. The builder handed over the assoc to us (condo owners)and then all heck broke loose with roof issues.

Good luck Heather and hope you found the Easter bunny.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

seekhelp

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 15067

posted 04-23-2011 11:24 PM

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This all sounds like such an undertaking. I'm so worried if I ever do find anything as I can't imagine spending or demolishing so much. I don't know what kind of insurance many 'think' they have, but coverage for mold is a thing of the past. it would have bankrupted many insurers. I recall reading many things in the policy with exclusions or ridiclously small coverage amounts.

A rife machine to kill mold? Wow, I couldn't trust my life to that. Too risky IMO.

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Posts: 6626 | From The 5th Dimension - The Twilight Zone | Registered: Mar 2008 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-23-2011 11:48 PM

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Let's say there was mold in a wall or ceiling and the moisture problem was fixed and the old dead mold is contained in the dried out wall and not airborn at all is it still a problem? I imagine if it is dry, contained, dead and not able to become airborn because it is closed up/contained it shouldn't pose a problem, right?

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-24-2011 12:17 AM

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Well, Seek I don't believe you would trust a rife machine to kill the simple cold/flu virus dear.

I'm not talking about a situation like Heather is in. But I can knock/disturb some mold spores, bacteria, viruses like you don't know/believe until one experiences it yourself.

Pam

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"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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Posts: 3521 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002 | IP: Logged |

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-24-2011 05:06 PM

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I have researched this for several years and left a much cherished home with too much toxic mold in the wall cavities. I also gave away all my furniture; what I tried to hold onto, was also contaminated so that once I was in a clear environment, I began to react to those items.

I then began to study how this could be, and how homes are built, and how mold grows in insulation, how water and moisture build up in wall cavities and ceiling cavities, and whether mold, once it is so prevalent in a structure that is even in high numbers in the dust (per ERMI test)--and what happens when you have both lyme and a genetic predisposition to be affected by mold, with immune system effects.

And the reality is, no, you can't remediate the home, the mold spores and toxins will have permeated it. If you are healthy, or not susceptible to mold illness, then you can remediate, sure. But if you are a person with lyme/mold illness, and you think spending all that money remediating is useful, it is not. You would only know if you left the environment completely for even a few weeks, bringing none of your contaminated items with you, and see how you felt away, and on your return. Usually, if you have a soup of toxic vocs from mold in your home, you will get sick or sicker immediately on re-entry.

Not everybody has this genetic predisposition. But anyone who is a lymie who is concerned enough to be going to the extent LymeMom is, is in my opinion very sincere but not making the correct decision. It's bargaining with a devil, and the devil doesn't bargain. The devil will remain. Did you know that mold spores can travel 50 mph, using water and air currents? Do you think that mold will stay in just one little area of the home? How did it end up in the ERMI sample?

A good book to read is Breathable Walls by George Swanson; Prescriptions for a Healthy Home by Paula Baker LaPorte, and all of Ritchie Shoemaker's work including his most recent on moldy buildings.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-24-2011 11:54 PM

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I am considering having my house tested but am worried about getting scammed. Since mold spores are everywhere, I would think a positive result would be expected anywhere whether there's visible mold or not. How can I be sure that a positive result truly indicated a problem?

Would running a HEPA air purifier help reduce the amount of mold spores in the air? And if there's no visibile mold in my home or smell is there any reason to test?

Has anyone here heard of using "Mold Dogs" to identify where mold is located in the home?

Am wondering if a week long trial run away from my home may be in order to determine if my house is the problem.

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Posts: 1242 | From Northeast | Registered: Jan 2008 | IP: Logged |

seekhelp

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 15067

posted 04-25-2011 12:51 AM

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I'm strongly considering the EMRI test, but I'm wondering if I truly can perform the sample testing correctly to make it worth any value. I agree Ticked1 that being scammed is a huge concern of mine.

The reason I have concern is every time I take my morning shower, i walk out feeling weak, eyes burning, sometimes nauseated, and generally worse than when I entered. I took a shower at a hotel out of state and experienced none of this. Something seems wrong.

I also have a dehumidifer in the basement and it just runs 24/7 even in the winter. Humidity jumps to 60%+ easily. I empty full pails of water from the water collection bucket daily. That seems like bad news.

Is this EMRI test believed to be worthwhile outside of the alternative circles?

Oxygenbabe, are you better now that you left to another home?

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Posts: 6626 | From The 5th Dimension - The Twilight Zone | Registered: Mar 2008 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-25-2011 09:45 AM

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I felt the ERMI test was the best way to tell if I have a problem because that is what Dr. S, author of Mold Warriors and his newer book Surviving Mold says to do.

All you do is connect their collection trap to a regular household vacuum and pick a 18 square foot area in the living room and a bedroom. I did my son's bedroom since he is the sickest.

If you do find mold you will have to do further testing to determine what areas are the worst...

The ERMI is only the beginning if you DO have an issue. I thought I was ruling my house out. I never imagined my house was the problem!

--------------------

~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-25-2011 09:49 AM

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quote:

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Originally posted by seekhelp:

I also have a dehumidifer in the basement and it just runs 24/7 even in the winter. Humidity jumps to 60%+ easily. I empty full pails of water from the water collection bucket daily. That seems like bad news.

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Why don't you have the dehumidifier draining on it's own? (with a hose)

And you asked, "Is this EMRI test believed to be worthwhile outside of the alternative circles?"

It's EPA approved.

--------------------

~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

seekhelp

Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)

Member # 15067

posted 04-25-2011 10:33 AM

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MomLyme, I need to get a longer hose to drain it to the sump pump. It's a real pain as I need to keep the dehumidifer a good distance from the sump pit or it'll never stop. It's probably 20 ft away. Typical hoses are 6 ft long for this purpose. I need to buy a 25 ft garden hose and cut one end off to customize it to the correct length.

I also have a LOT of plants in my basement because I grow stuff for my garden. I'm guessing that doesn't help with humidity. lol.

MomLyme, do you have the phone number of the company you used to do the EMRI testing? I'd like to call and talk to them more.

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Tammy N.

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 26835

posted 04-25-2011 11:06 AM

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Seek - sump pump in the house is not a good idea, as I've been reading....

I understand the thinking behind it, but that means that water is already inside. The trick is to fix the problem from the outside so water never gets in.

btw - I sadly thew out all of my houseplants for right now. (I love love love plants, but knew that they had to go right now as I'm battling with all of this stuff).

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Posts: 724 | From NJ | Registered: Jul 2010 | IP: Logged |

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-25-2011 12:05 PM

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The best test is to go away for two weeks, with a few cheap new outfits, don't bring much from the house even your computer, go to a clear clean place where you can be outdoors in good air much of the day and see if you feel better. THEN come back and see how sick you feel.

All the testing and remediating is imo a waste of money if you are mold sensitive or have toxic molds/bacteria in your home.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

tickled1

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 14257

posted 04-25-2011 12:07 PM

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Anyone else have a problem with family accepting the possibility of all of this and the magnitude of it all?

I mean with what Lyme and Co. has already taken away from me and my family, to then have to break it to them that we would maybe have to say bye-bye to our house and belongings? I realize there truly could be something to all of this but how can I "go there"? I can't wrap my mind around all of it and can't even imagine what springing this on my family would do to us.

Really, the thought of uprooting my family on top of what we've already been through just seems unimaginable even if this is the culprit. I mean, if I'm that far gone that I need to take these measures I'm thinking enough is enough. What will be next? If it was just me I'd probably entertain all of it as I do believe the possibility of this but I don't know how to continue to take my family on this roller coaster ride with me. They've been through enough.

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momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-25-2011 12:15 PM

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quote:

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Originally posted by seekhelp:

MomLyme, do you have the phone number of the company you used to do the EMRI testing? I'd like to call and talk to them more.

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Tel: (732) 355-9018

I called and talked to Dr. Lin before I ordered mine. He was very helpful.

--------------------

~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-25-2011 12:22 PM

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quote:

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Originally posted by oxygenbabe:

The best test is to go away for two weeks, with a few cheap new outfits, don't bring much from the house even your computer, go to a clear clean place where you can be outdoors in good air much of the day and see if you feel better. THEN come back and see how sick you feel.

All the testing and remediating is imo a waste of money if you are mold sensitive or have toxic molds/bacteria in your home.

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So how do you know if the new place you move into (rent or buy) is mold free? You test, you remediate, you buy a air purifier, you wash all non porous surfaces with a solution of ammonia and water.

Whether you are sensitive to mold or not mycotoxins can kill you. Mold is not an allergen. People with mold allergies may sniff a little.

Mold is know to be a precursor to cancer, immune disfunction and heart disease!

I would be far more worried about these things than being sensitive to mold.

How bout if you move out and remediate while you are out so you have a clean home to go home to!

I understand that some houses may be beyond repair...

but most are able to be lived in after remediation with professional help!

--------------------

~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

momlyme

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 27775

posted 04-25-2011 12:28 PM

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tickled - I am sorry you are so overwhelmed.

I thank God most of my family is so sick that they are willing to do anything to get well.

Perhaps my husband thought I was overreacting when he brought a gym bag into our motel room.

I said -"if you bring clothes they must be in a plastic, grocery bag..." and I put the gym bag in the trunk of his car.

IMO, we would be better off washing clothes in a laundromat before bringing them into our room. That is a lot to ask, though.

No papers, no books.

I did bring my laptop. Some clothes. My pills, supplements... and I am cleaning like a mad woman.

--------------------

~Heather

Praying for recovery... for all who are suffering.

In the meantime... searching for answers.

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Posts: 1515 | From NY/VT Border | Registered: Aug 2010 | IP: Logged |

MichaelTampa

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 24868

posted 04-25-2011 01:16 PM

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tickled--Regarding the question of how does one test when mold is everywhere, my understanding is that they test the air outside your house and the air inside your house (potentially various locations of each). What they like to see for a "good/clean/negative" test result is the level of mold in the inside air being 10% or less than that of the outside air.

I haven't had this done yet. We had obvious problems that we were going to fix anyway, so, since the testing is expensive, we're fixing some things first, then we'll test to see if we've done enough.

Anyone know anything about dehumidifiers. I live in Florida, so we run A/C a lot in the summer. But, sometimes in the late fall and winter and early spring, the temperature is good, but it is still humid. I'll find myself sometimes running the A/C to dry it out, then eventually running the heat when it gets too cold, and so on, just to keep the humidity down. I feel very uncomfortable when it is humid.

So, anyway, to my question--is there a way I can get them to convert my "regular" full-home A/C & heater unit into something that will also just dehumidify without cooling/heating? Sort of don't know where to go, who to ask, to get the right thing.

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oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-25-2011 03:26 PM

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LymeMom, you just haven't researched it thoroughly, with all due respect. I lived through it and I researched it extensively. Sorry, but you can't remediate a home with toxic mold, *if* you are already sick from it and a lymie and mold sensitive (I'm not talking allergies). It can't be done. You may improve your home, at the loss of many thousands of dollars, but you won't get rid of it. And any exposure is going to crash your immune system and make it difficult for anybody to get well. Believe me. I went through it. I also went through the denial and bargaining stage. I had a great home. I had beautiful furniture and clothes. Nothing is worth it, if you can feel better and get better away from the mold, at which point your immune system may come back online enough to handle treatments that previously were not working because of profound immune dysregulation from toxic mold voc's (and bacteria don't forget they like water damaged buildings, too).

Remediation is a necessity for the HEALTHY.

I really don't know what more to add. I know it's daunting, and most people don't want to think about it or do it.

As for not knowing whether another home is moldy, you definitely should get a history of water damage, have the home tested ahead of time (ERMI and have a good Indoor Air Quality consultant come through and make sure there is no moisture in the walls, etc) and RENT not buy, or RENT before buying in case you make a very bad error on home #2 and need to move from that, too.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-25-2011 03:28 PM

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By the way, air purifiers will do nothing much for a situation where a home has toxic mold. They may catch some of the mold spores, that's all.

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Posts: 2030 | From united states | Registered: Jun 2004 | IP: Logged |

chaps

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 25286

posted 04-25-2011 09:39 PM

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quote:

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By the way, air purifiers will do nothing much for


05/01/2011 01:39 AM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

more from gigi's MOLD detailed info from members:

oxygenbabe

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 5831

posted 04-30-2011 10:14 AM

Unexpected, did you take your belongings with you on each move?

You can't do that if you lived in a really contaminated place, which it sounds like you did. You need to get rid of your clothing, upholstery, and any soft woods.

A very hard glossy laminated wood, metal and glass can be kept.

All the rest will be contaminated with toxins and spores and spore fragments and you will continue to react.

The inflammation levels in your body could be really high. What you, and maybe Seekhelp need to do is to completely get out of that environment for a while. See if you feel better. Don't keep re-exposing yourself.

There is a fellow named Jonathan Wright who got mold poisoned and bedridden, he moved and took his stuff with him and remained sick. He didn't get well until he gave away everything and went camping in the wilderness for a year.

I'm not saying you have to camp in the wilderness (though we've been doing it).

Think of the mold like radioactivity--like the Japan plant. Think of the toxicity that remains in contaminated items and only slowly degrades (cesium over hundreds of years). I'm just using that like an analogy.

I know Dr. S helps people but it is my personal experience all that money doesn't have to be spent, nor on remediation.

First get out of the environment and get rid of everything; put what you're really attached to in storage and forget about it for a few years.

Then go to a clear place. Once you're clear, then consider treatments that help.

For me, IV therapy is so important (IV glutathione, meyers cocktails, and a small amount of IVIG).

Hyperbaric oxygen can really help.

Cholestyramine helps some, but nano chitosan from Allergy Research Group does the same thing.

-------------------------

map1131

Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)

Member # 2022

posted 04-30-2011 10:37 AM

Oxygen, know your total load? I'm sure you mean more testing on myself?

For 10 years now I've be cleaning up my life. I gave up cigs, artificial sweetners, cleaning supplies, teflon, deodorant, toxic folks, make-up except rarely, 10 teeth that were filled silver or had silver crowns that dated back to 1970, etc, etc.

I'm down to one root canal and one toothless quad that is no doubt a toxic wasteland in my mouth. Within a year this will be clean.

I'm going to do a major chelelation(sp) and get rid 53 yrs of toxic overload. Pam

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UnexpectedIlls

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 15144

posted 04-30-2011 10:38 AM

oxygenbabe...

We did get rid of probably 90% of our things. Even all of our daughters toys and everything.. It was heartbreaking.

If We didn;t have a 4 year old and a teenager. We would go live outdoors no problem.. it becomes difficult when you have children. We did take some clothes but were washed before going into new apartment.

The last apartment we lived in we bought new bed, mattress, dressers, clothes, etc and keep it really simple.

When we moved to this hosue last year we brought the couch frmo the last apartmet that was new and that last apartment did not have mold as far as we know.. we moved for differnet reasons.

I did bring books and pictures and important documents from hosue to hosue... I would never get rid of any of my pictures..my mother lost all my baby and childhood pictures and i have none so i wanted to make sure i always had my babies pictures.

I have only lived in this house for a year and still no change. We don't have any furniture or anything from the moldy hosue... except books and pictures (pictures are boxed up)

it doesn;t make sense that there would be cross contamination when we got rid of 90% of our things from the suspected moldy house.

The things that were kept were washed... the only furniture piece that we kept was my vintage dresser but that was also cleaned.

This is all highly frustrating and downright depressing. I am missing out on my kids lives because of this.. spending the 4 years my daughter has been here in bed too sick to take care of her and my son not having a mother to take care of him at all..

I have missed everything, games, school events, outings, family celebrations, etc etc... I just want to know once and for all what the heck is wrong with me and fix it.. and that is not for lack of trying...

I have been to some 50 doctors over 4 years and have tried every treatment in the book.. nothing has helped.

hope this all made sense... I am confused.

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aMomWithHope

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 19255

posted 04-30-2011 02:38 PM

Wow, this is very alarming, but I'm now wondering if this may be an issue for my dd.

This nightmare of Lyme first became evident a day after she came home with a throw pillow that was given to her from a friend. DD loved the wolf on it, so her friend gave it to her.

She had it in her bedroom. It smelled moldy, so I moved it out of her room. Found out a few days later that the pillow had been stored in the friend's basement. DD woke up the next day with her now-going-on-3-years-24/7-headache! I threw the pillow out the day I found out it had been stored in the basement.

Would she still have symptoms (if caused by mold from that pillow) after all these years?

Every day I log on here and there seems to be yet another issue to look into--it is never ending and incredibly frustrating.

I agree with those who have posted saying it is all so overwhelming--

Why do these infections (Lyme and co-infections)require so much more effort to "cure"?

There doesn't seem to be any other infections that require such complete remediation in all areas of one's life?

Really makes me wonder what is truly going on with these infections

.............

Tammy N.

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 26835

posted 04-30-2011 06:55 PM

If she has the genetic issue in that her body cannot process the toxins from mold, then yes, that could have been the trigger for the cascading poor health.

Removal from the exposure is not enough for those with the genetic issue. Certain and specific interventions are necessary.

Definitely search further into this mold/biotoxin issue; start with survivingmold.com.

I would also recommend getting the book.


08/07/2011 01:21 PM
lymept
lymept  
Posts: 7
Member

the propolis difuser sounds like it could work

anyone know where i can find more information

where i can find one?


08/10/2011 09:21 PM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate


08/10/2011 09:27 PM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

Household Mold During Infancy May Trigger Asthma

Kids exposed to mold as babies were three times more likely to develop the lung condition

By Robert Preidt

Friday, August 5, 2011

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) --

Exposure to household mold in infancy greatly increases a child's risk of developing asthma, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed seven years of data collected from 176 children who were followed from infancy as part of the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study.

The children were considered at high risk of developing asthma because of family medical history.

By age 7, 18 percent of the children developed asthma.

Children who lived in homes with mold during infancy were three times more likely to develop asthma by age 7 than those who weren't exposed to mold when they were infants.

"Early life exposure to mold seems to play a critical role in childhood asthma development," lead author Tiina Reponen, a professor of environmental health at the University of Cincinnati, said in a university news release.

"Genetic factors are also important to consider in asthma risk, since infants whose parents have an allergy or asthma are at the greatest risk of developing asthma."

"This study should motivate expectant parents, especially if they have a family history of allergy or asthma, to correct water damage and reduce the mold burden in their homes to protect the respiratory health of their children," Reponen added.

The study appears in the August issue of the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Overall, about 9 percent of school-aged children in the United States develop asthma, but research has shown that rates are higher among children in poor, urban families.

SOURCE: University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, news release, Aug. 4, 2011

Copyright (c) 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/ fullstory_115081.html


08/15/2011 01:01 AM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
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I'm an Advocate

Fungal Disease Increasing Problem in Older Adults**histoplasmosis, coccidiodomycosis, and blastomycosis

By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: August 11, 2011

Reviewed by

Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and

Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

Action Points

■Explain that a study using a 5% sample from the Medicare claims database found cases of histoplasmosis, coccidiodomycosis, and blastomycosis among older adults, including about one in 10 without apparent exposure in known endemic areas.

■Note that the study was retrospective and based on claims data.

Opportunistic fungal infections increasingly are being seen among older adults, even among those who reside outside endemic areas, a retrospective study showed.

Among a random sample of almost two million adults 65 and older, there were 776 cases of endemic myocoses between 1999 and 2008, according to John W. Baddley, MD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues.

And importantly, about one in ten of the cases was diagnosed in a patient who had no known geographic exposure to the endemic areas of the Midwest and West, the researchers reported online in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

This finding highlights the importance of having clinicians be familiar with the signs and symptoms of these infections, according to Baddley.

"It is important to continue surveillance for these infections as the proportion of older Americans increases and their use of immune-suppressing drugs becomes more common," he told MedPage Today.

Infections such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and blastomycosis have gained in importance among older adults, who may have have undergone chemotherapy or whose immunity has weakened with age.

In addition, travel and outdoor activities have become more popular with retirees, possibly increasing their likelihood of being exposed and inhaling mycotic spores.

Data are sparse, however, concerning the incidence of these infections, concomitant diseases in affected persons, or the precise areas of the country where they are most commonly found.

Baddley and colleagues examined inpatient and outpatient Medicare claims data for 5% of the older U.S. population.

They identified 357 cases of histoplasmosis, 345 of coccidioidomycosis, and 74 of blastomycosis among patients whose mean age was 75.7 years.

Slightly more than half were men.

Underlying conditions included

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 34.8% (95% CI 28.4 to 39.8),

diabetes in 22% (95% CI 19.9 to 27), and

solid malignancies in 16.5% (95% CI 11.9 to 27).

More patients with blastomycosis had solid malignancies, whereas more patients with histoplasmosis had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Mortality at three months was 9.5% for all three of the mycoses.

Histoplasmosis had the highest incidence rate, at 3.3 per 100,000 person-years.

The incidence of coccidioidomycosis was 3.2 per 100,000, while that for blastomycosis was 0.7 per 100,000.

The highest incidence for histoplasmosis by region was in the Midwest, at 6.1 per 100,000 person-years, and most notably in Indiana and Arkansas, where the incidence rates were 13 and 12 per 100,000, respectively.

Blastomycosis also was most common in the Midwest, at 1 case per 100,000 person-years, with the highest rates being in Mississippi and Wisconsin, at 6.4 and 5.7 per 100,000, respectively.

The most cases of coccidioidomycosis were seen in western states, with an overall incidence of 15.2 per 100,000, and particularly in Arizona, at 90.5 per 100,000, and California, at 10.1 per 100,000.

There were cases of all three of the fungal infections in areas beyond these endemic regions.

To ascertain if these unexpected cases could be ascribed to exposure through travel, the researchers also considered if these patients had a medical claim for a mycotic infection filed from an endemic area, which would suggest that the patient had visited and perhaps been exposed at the time.

Among 90 cases in patients living elsewhere than endemic areas, no exposure could be identified for 11%.

Potential limitations of the study include the use of Medicare claims data, which may not represent all older Americans, and the possibility of ascertainment bias where cases are more likely to be recognized in areas traditionally considered endemic.

Validation of use of claims data for diagnosis of mycotic infection was also lacking, as was independent information about travel or earlier residence in an endemic area.

"Additional contemporary data regarding endemic mycoses among older persons in the United States are needed and would be helpful for identifying disease patterns and the geographic distribution of infection and for targeting areas for focused disease prevention," Baddley and associates wrote.

The study was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

One co-author received research support from Amgen.

Primary source: Emerging Infectious Diseases

Source reference:

Baddley J, et al "Geographic distribution of endemic fungal infections among older persons, United States" Emerg Infect Dis 2011; DOI: 10.3201/eid1709.101987.

View Comments By: Healthcare Professionals All

liek sari handikin - Aug 11, 2011

Thank you for the article.

As an ORL-Head and Neck Surgeon may I underline the result of the study.

My experience with upper aerodigestive endoscopy showed the problem of fungi infections, usually found due to overtreatment with antibiotics.

The base of the tongues were mostly plaqued by candida colonies.

L.S.Handikin ORL-HN Surgery Jakarta,Indonesia http://www.laser-med.blogspot.com

********************************

alfonso e. sierra - Aug 11, 2011

Gardening, cleaning or working in damp basements and the old-honored art of pigeon raising and tending and walking or running in river banks and ocean shores, where seagulls and other birds abound and feed could also contribute.

tom hennessy - Aug 12, 2011

The key word in the article is 'older' patients.

Age-related iron accumulation can explain this finding evidenced by the fact fungal infections are treated with drugs which chelate iron.

"Ciclopirox olamine" "Currently used for the treatment of mild to moderate cutaneous fungal infection"

"Ciclopirox olamine chelates intracellular iron"

"Iron accumulates as a function of age and is associated with the pathology of numerous age related diseases"

********************************

bonnie macrae - Aug 13, 2011

I had an elderly pt who was from some country close to Russia who has scarring all over her body from some fungus. It returned and seemed to be sq.

I tub bathed her and added a very small amount of bleach to water which cleared it up.

It came back, so Doctor prescribed a thick white cream (something I had never seen before so probably experimental) but that did not help at all.

Then I got a little of the fungus sq on my hand. No itching, but it looked nasty!

It did not respond to bleach, but hydrocortizone in combination with a drying cream cleared it up.

It took a long time to go away, but massage of the affected area seemed to help. No scarring.

*************************************

© 2011 Everyday Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Geriatrics/GeneralGeriatrics/ 28002?utm_content=&utm_medium=email& utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=

bettyg note:

my late dad had BLASTOMYCOSIS in 1957, age 45; he was paralyzed from his neck down. in hospital 30 days; he couldn't lift his hands, they had to crawl slowly to kitchen table.

after getting out he had to DRINK STRAIGHT IODINE to eventually get over this.

he was also able to regain of his ENTIRE BODY; i was age 5-6 when this occurred.

twice in his life he was paralyzed from his neck down; TWICE HE RECOVERED FULLY!!

he also had UNDIAGNOSED LYME DISEASE and perhaps several co-infections for 80 years!!

Post edited by: Bettyg, at: 08/15/2011 01:02 AM


12/02/2013 10:19 AM
nickim
 
Posts: 11
New Member

I have been looking for a mold group. I have been exposed to 9 different molds and did not find out in time. I am glad to see you putting the info out for other people. It is horrible when it gets into your blood stream.

12/02/2013 10:20 AM
nickim
 
Posts: 11
New Member

I have been looking for a mold group. I have been exposed to 9 different molds and did not find out in time. I am glad to see you putting the info out for other people. It is horrible when it gets into your blood stream.

12/02/2013 02:42 PM
Bettyg
 
Posts: 33642
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

kim, glad you found the info i posted worthwhile.

i used our quick searchin upper right hand corner and found many links where MOLD is mentioned.

http://www.mdjunction.com/search-results?q=mold

you could send a private messageshowno, n left side to OWNER, ROY, asking that he start a mold forum here! i see he hasn't;

i checked; surprised!

just chose COMPOSE on top line of private message line ok.

bettyg, iowa Wink

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