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02/24/2011 12:28 AM

Stanford launched new Infection-Associated CFSsite

Bettyg
 
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Stanford launched new Infection-Associated CFS site (IACFS)

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi? ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=026895;p=0

kday

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 22234

posted 02-23-2011 08:28 PM

Stanford launched their new site:

http://chronicfatigue.stanford.edu/

Infection-associated chronic diseases that our group studies include

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Lyme Disease, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis, and other unexplained chronic illnesses.

We are interested in learning more about how infectious agents may play an etiologic role in these diseases.

These infectious agents include

human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), retroviruses such as xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii, fungi such as Coccidiodes immitis, and bacteria such as Borrelia burgdorferi (the cause of Lyme disease)

.

Lymenet, and forums for other chronic conditions are listed in the resources section.

These tick-borne disease foundations/organizations are on the resources page as well:

• Columbia University

• LDA

• ILADS

• And last, but not least, the beloved IDSA

In summary, it is plausible that the persistent activity of intracellular pathogens or the immune response against them could lead to the complex and chronic dysfunction observed in patients with CFS.

Furthermore, it is possible that if the infectious trigger is appropriately identified, significant clinical benefit can be observed with appropriate long-term antimicrobial therapy.

Camp Other

LymeNet Contributor

Member # 29797

posted 02-23-2011 09:02 PM

Here is a link to the team lead, in case anyone wanted more info on his background:

http://med.stanford.edu/profiles/chronicfatigue/researcher/ Jose_Montoya

Post edited by: Bettyg, at: 02/24/2011 12:28 AM

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