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12/21/2010 04:11 PM

Does Low ACTH, (SAI) give you 'Evil Brain Fog'??

Waytoohandsome
Posts: 474
Member

I spoke to a doctor today who told me that secondary adrenal insufficiency (low ACTH) does not create mental impairment such as difficulty concentrating, difficulty focusing and trouble with memory.

Does that match your experience?

Y'all agree or disagree on this one?

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12/21/2010 11:55 PM
bob3bob3
bob3bob3Posts: 4213
Senior Member

Disagree..

12/22/2010 09:50 PM
Waytoohandsome
Posts: 474
Member

But, but....but...

She's a certified DOCTORologist!

And you're not!

Duzzn't that just make you want to reconsider? After all, you're only the patient, how would YOU know?

Wink


12/22/2010 10:27 PM
bob3bob3
bob3bob3Posts: 4213
Senior Member

Nup!

Certification is not a measure of competence. <grin>

And believe me I am never patient with a doctor...

How? Cause and effect... reasoning, logical outcome and an infinitesimally small number of very few wild guesses.

The logic (for lurkers - I am sure you know) Aside from physical causes like damage to brain material, the most common reason for loss of cognition/memory is low BG or BOX.

Cortisol is a catabolic steroid. When the levels of steroid falls, so does the BG. Yes insulin should drop back as the BG falls but eventually that will reach zero output and BG will plummet.

ergo.....

One of the oft things I hear is that many medical people believe that cortisol is ONLY a stress response system. In simplistic terms if it failed then you'd be okay if you stayed calm! Unfortunately there is a baseline level that kind of seem important...

Bob


12/25/2010 10:28 PM
emmybear
Posts: 32
Member

Totally disagree! And I feel totally outraged on your behalf that a physician told you that. That is just not true at all. Evil brain fog is definitely a symptom of hypoglycemia, low cortisol, and many other endocrine problems. In fact, one of the key symptoms of somebody with hypoglycemia is confusion. Your brain uses glucose as its fuel.

12/27/2010 08:23 AM
Waytoohandsome
Posts: 474
Member

Emmy, she gives out this advice on a weekly basis, not just to me. This is a neuro-endo-doctorologist at a place that prides itself on being the best of the best of the best.

Does anyone else experience 'cognitive impairment' with low cortisol? That's the medical way to express it.

I prefer the slightly more colorful "I feel almost as smart as Patrick Starfish"!!


12/27/2010 10:12 PM
AnnaO
AnnaO  
Posts: 231
Member

Yes, yes, and yes! I have terrible brain fog that can be attributed to either hypothyroidism or low cortisol (not sure which). It has been progressively getting worse over the past year, but became dramatically worse starting last summer - to the point where it is very difficult to function at work.

I hide it as best I can and lean on team members more than I did previously, but my managers have recognized me as "working well collaboratively" so my deficiency doesn't show to them very much Smile

My brain fog and lack of concentration are at their worst when I have to do independent activities that require certain areas of the brain. Writing (as in writing articles or technical documents), reading, and routinized tasks are the hardest to accomplish. I also experience short-term memory lapses and difficulty handling multiple priorities, which I used to be able to do.

The cognitive impairments cause me a great deal of stress and anxiety about work that I really don't need right now.

I have only recently started treatment and hope to see improvements soon.

Best wishes,

Anna


01/01/2011 07:54 AM
Waytoohandsome
Posts: 474
Member

OK, so evil brain fog is in.

Do these fog symptoms go away when receiving treatment (pred, HC, or alternative glucocorticoids) or do they remain full force or is it more like 'a bit of the fog lifting' but it's still somewhat there????

I duzzn't haz treatment yet, that's why I am curious.


01/04/2011 08:15 PM
emmybear
Posts: 32
Member

Well my fiance's experience has been that when he is on the correct dosages of all of his medications yes, the brain fog lifts. But since he has hypothyroidism, 2ndary adrenal insufficiency, and secondary hypogonadism, I can't say specifically what his experience has been with the hydrocortisone alone.

01/04/2011 09:51 PM
radiochick
radiochick  
Posts: 451
Member

I've notice increased congnativity (I just made that up) while I am at a good point with HC. So, I vote that yes brain fog lifts with cortisol. I have also noticed this when my Synthroid was increased..... but the HC is immediately noticable... as opposes to several days to several weeks with Synthroid changes.
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