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11/13/2008 07:02 AM

I Just Found This

Starr
Starr  
Posts: 3358
Senior Member

I just found this article that some may find of interest.

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CoQ10 Helps Muscle Strength for Physically Active

Nearly everyone who plays sports or exercises regularly would benefit from a way to protect against muscle fatigue and the wear and tear of minor muscle injuries... and a recent study may offer the solution -- Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Discovered in 1957, this compound is found in the mitochondria of human cells. This antioxidant has been studied for use in treating migraine headaches, heart disease, hypertension and even some forms of cancer.

The 20-day study, done at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, involved 18 elite athletes and was double-blind controlled -- neither the researchers nor the athletes knew who took CoQ10 and who took a placebo. Both groups trained five and one-half hours per day for six days during the experiment period. Blood samples were taken on day one, day three and day five to measure levels of creatine kinase, an enzyme associated with muscle injury, and myoglobin, a blood protein. When elevated, both substances are markers of muscle damage. Levels had increased with both groups, but the athletes who had been taking CoQ10 had less muscle damage.

HOW DOES COQ10 HELP?

I called Christine Kontomerkos, ND, to ask about how CoQ10 might benefit those of us with more ordinary athletic abilities. She says it makes sense that CoQ10 would be helpful in improving tolerance for greater muscle workloads, since it is mostly found in the power-producing areas of cells. One of the main functions of CoQ10 is to help produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), a phosphate compound that is a major source of the body's energy. Since extreme exercise can injure muscles, CoQ10 supplementation might help lessen the fatigue and muscle weakness that often follow.

Interestingly, use of statins can also deplete CoQ10, so this may be a helpful supplement for those who take these pharmaceutical drugs, says Dr. Kontomerkos. Since CoQ10 levels naturally begin a decline after your 20s, older people who want to restore their depleted reserves may want to consider supplementation as well. Typical dosages are between 60 mg to 200 mg a day (in divided doses with meals), but it is best to work with a nutritionally oriented healthcare professional to pin down the right dosage for you, as the correct CoQ10 dosage depends on individual health status, age and needs. Do not take CoQ10 without your doctor's approval if you are on blood thinners or having chemotherapy. And, you can also get CoQ10 from dietary sources, including mackerel, sardines and organ meats.

Source(s):

Christine Kontomerkos, ND, of Trumbull Naturopathic & Acupuncture in Trumbull, Connecticut.

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My question is, how many of you have tried CoQ10, and do you feel that it has helped you?

Reply

11/13/2008 08:18 AM
kidtakekid
kidtakekid  
Posts: 7
Member

I have heard about this CoQ10 and how it has helped with the production of ATP. I have not tried it yet,cause I wanted to try D-Ribose first. D-Ribose enhances the productin of ATP also. D-Ribose is a simple sugar that the body produces. People with FM and CFS have been found to have low levels of this. The effects of it take 10 days to occur. I have had some benefit with it with regular excersize of course. This supplement is quite pricey I think. CoQ10 is next I hope to have some benefit with it also.

Has anyone tried this supplement?


11/13/2008 08:57 AM
Starr
Starr  
Posts: 3358
Senior Member

Where do you find D-Ribose?

11/13/2008 09:09 AM
Debi
Debi  
Posts: 137
Member

I have tried Ribose. I really didn't find that it helped much. My husband found it at GNC.

11/13/2008 12:34 PM
3doglife
3doglifePosts: 19
Member

Has anyone tried Melatonin and 5htp to help with sleep and mood? I ran across an article by a Dr Roger Murphree who supposedly treats only fibro patients but it is expensive to order his book, CD and supplements. He did have an article about "The Importance of a Good Nights Sleep" that was free and very interesting but thought I would check with you all before I take the big financial plunge so if anyone else has tried or heard of him

Debbi


11/13/2008 12:48 PM
mcbeth
mcbeth  
Posts: 1559
Senior Member

3doglife, I HAVE taken Melatonin & 5-HTP and it worked great. Melatonin is something like 5.33 at Wal-Mart and I didn't think 5-HTP is around 7 something.

You can also buy different strenths of it I belive at Walgreens. Walgreens in general is more expensive here, and the higher the mg the higher the price.

edited becuase I typed that wrongDizzy

Post edited by: mcbeth, at: 11/14/2008 07:07


11/13/2008 02:03 PM
Starr
Starr  
Posts: 3358
Senior Member

I take Melatonin 5mg at night. If it aides in sleeping, great. But I actually take it for its anti-aging properties. (I am, afterall, ageless, you know)

I wish that I could find the article explaining this, but as we know, melatonin is supposed to be naturally created in our systems. A lack of melatonin increases aging and the problems that go along with it. That is my main purpose for taking it.


11/14/2008 06:43 AM
KariJo
KariJo  
Posts: 118
Member

Meletonin is great for sleep. I have only been taking 3mg....do you think the 5 mg is any better/worse?? It takes a few weeks to get into your system but then it helps.

I have just started taking COQ10 after my migraine (occipital neralgia) surgery. The surgeon said is aids in tissue and nerve health. I have been on it 7 weeks now at 150mg/day. I unfortunately haven't noticed any difference in my joint pain. Now that I am off some of my other meds, I may be able to tell when it does work...if it does for me. I have a friend that says it has helped her fibro, but she has been on it for over a year now.


11/14/2008 06:55 AM
Starr
Starr  
Posts: 3358
Senior Member

I went for the 5mg because I have mal-absorption problems. It always takes more of something to affect me the way less would affect other people. That's why I always worry doctors and dentists, because it takes so much of anything to work on me.

Anyway, if CoQ10 is for tissue and nerrve health, I don't think that would include joints. Chondroitin and.......(darn fibro-fog) should help with that.

Speaking of fog, that's another frustrating thing for me. I read up a lot on herbal supplements. I find one (like CoQ10) that sparks my interest, but then I can never remember why it sparked my interest.

I have good reasons for taking all the supplements I do, but I can't for the life of me remember what those reasons are. I just keep taking them. I really hate it when a doctor says...and you take the grapeseed for what? And I have no clue and can't answer him. And Ginkgo Biloba does nothing for fibro-fog, I've determined. It only works on people with "normal" brain function. Laughing

Anyway, I am still interested in hearing from others on the CoQ10. Is it helpful to you? If so, in what ways?


11/14/2008 07:29 AM
collegegirl
collegegirlPosts: 72
Member

i tried CoQ10 when I was first diagnosed and I didn't feel any change from it, I also am the princess and the pea when it comes to eating things and found it tasted really bad so I had no problem stopping it.
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