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10/18/2009 02:36 PM

im curious about something.

shamarie6
shamarie6  
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I read these posts & everyone keeps talking about being in a 'flare'. It just dawned on me that I wasn't really sure how one could tell that you were in a flare. I've been hurting constantly since probably june, with the exception of when I was taking oxycontin. I did really good on that stuff, but boy, its expensive! I guess my question is, what is a flare?
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10/18/2009 02:53 PM
fibromite
fibromitePosts: 810
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I would say when I feel absolutely horrible like I have the flu. Right now I only have pain in my neck, shoulders, and back. Bad enough! But, when I have pain all over - burning, stabbing, etc.from head to toes and I feel fatigued and "out of it" I would consider that a flare. Mine will last a few weeks but I will get a break from the occasional all over flare and only have discomfort in a few places. I'm never 100% pain free but I consider this feeling good. That's sad but true. Sorry to hear you have been in a flare since June. That's aweful! How is your diet? I recently began a major health kick and have been feeling alot better - forcing those fruits and veggies down.

10/18/2009 03:01 PM
Stella77
Stella77  
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My flares were when I had to stay in bed for days or weeks and couldn't get up to do anything.

10/18/2009 03:02 PM
hatbox121
hatbox121  
Posts: 11022
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A flare is basically worse than your normal. It can also be when you experience new symptoms that last longer than a day or two. For example you have your "normal" days, let's say they are a 4 on your pain scale. You wake up one morning and are at a 8. It sticks around throughout the day and into the next. At this point you should know you are in a flare. Flares can last a couple of days, weeks, months, or even years.

10/18/2009 03:05 PM
hatbox121
hatbox121  
Posts: 11022
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Sorry also wanted to add that I've been hurting more than normal since last June. It went even higher this past November. Since you've been basically the same since June, this may be your new "normal".

10/18/2009 03:49 PM
shamarie6
shamarie6  
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Oh, good god, you're all kidding, right? My doctor seems to think that well be able to get things back to my old 'norm', upbeat, going 90 to nothin , so I can go back to work. You see, I was working at a dog biscuit factory, there's a lot of heavy lifting, & repetious motion. It can be pretty difficult being a healthy person. There's absolutely no way I could return feeling the way I do. Granted, after my hysterectomy, I was able to return to work, but I've never been the same, not to mention the fact that I also worked at a convinience store @ night. I haven't even been able to return to the store since this 'flare'!

10/18/2009 04:12 PM
hatbox121
hatbox121  
Posts: 11022
Group Leader

And you very well may go back. I was working for years in construction and building cars, other heavy lifting type stuff. This may be a flare for you. I do hate to say though that you probably won't ever be your old self. You may get close but you'll probably still have to watch how much you do, stuff like that. Try to keep stress free, etc. Of course everyone is different. There are remissions too. Those can also last days, weeks, or years. Just depends.

10/18/2009 04:12 PM
Jezwik

Whether it is a long "flare", or a general worsening of the fibro symptoms, since June, have you had any med adjustments to accompany your worsening symptoms?

10/18/2009 04:24 PM
Natalia5150
Natalia5150  
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When You come to a somewhat delicate balance of pain vs function, the meds are holding you together, you know what your pain scale is and your are bumbling through life in a holding pattern waiting for the next greatest medication promising relief.....

then, for whatever reason, you suddenly have more pain than you have ever had, you are now in the process; redefining your pain scale, no longer functioning but you are just waiting in this nebulous world of conscious and semi-sleep just waiting for the time to slowly tick by so that you can take more medicine, while wondering how much is safe to take and what can you do to break the pain.....

For me, my first real flare, felt like I was giving birth through my mouth since all the pain was going up and the worst was in my face...

well, I have decided now, that whenever I have to redefine my upper pain scale, I have had a flare....

ShaMarie, you beautiful lady, you, I pray that you never ever ever have to redefine your pain scale, I pray you never learn what the limits of what you think you can handle, I pray you never have to go through a flare, that your doctor understands and believes and that all of us will benefit from some new discovery .....

hugs and love

Natalia

all I want for Christmas is the end of fibro as we know it.....

and the tea set......

and the years supply of tea.......

and world peace, of course!

Post edited by: Natalia5150, at: 10/18/2009 04:31 PM

Post edited by: Natalia5150, at: 10/19/2009 12:49 PM


10/18/2009 04:24 PM
shamarie6
shamarie6  
Posts: 2805
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I'm an Advocate

My old doc put me on the oxycontin because I had been taking lortab 10s & percocet 10s, & I was still hurting terribly! I faught him for a month & a half over it because its so addictive. I finally gave in. I wokke up crying in pain every day, it was so bad! Anyhow, I took. The oxycontin for about 2 months. He rxd it three times a day, I only took it twice a day, with the oxi ir for breakthrough pain. When I went off it, it was as if I couldn't controll my body. Had muscle spasms like crazy. I went down to the lortab 7.5, then to the norco 7.5 because my liver is enlarged. Other than that, I haven't really done any other med chngs.
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