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04/12/2008 07:25 AM

OMG you guys have to read this...

Linny
Linny  
Posts: 31
Member

I sent out a video about fibro to my email list and a co-worker of mine sent me this link... Its kind of creepy, but maybe a reason for why we feel this way. I know im going to bring it up next time i see my doctor...

http://naturalhealthpractice.org/aspartame.htm

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04/12/2008 07:51 AM
rkselter

Oh wonderful! To a diabetic such as my self this is insult to injury. I really hope that the data that you brought to my attention is very wrong. But, all the same, thanks for telling me, at least I will know what is killing me.

Call Dr.House, I am doomed.


04/12/2008 07:55 AM
Linny
Linny  
Posts: 31
Member

Im sorry!

04/12/2008 07:55 AM
Linny
Linny  
Posts: 31
Member

I thought it was interesting

04/12/2008 08:02 AM
prince
 
Posts: 176
Member

All I can say is WOW! Thanks for sharing, Linny! I am also going to bring this to my doc or should I say all of my doctors, including my dentist, since all I chew is sugarfree gum. Isn't that what we are taught? I also have instilled in my son to only chew sugarfree gum. I have heard that you should try to stay away from aspartane if you have Fibro, but not that it is the cause of such symptoms.

04/12/2008 08:03 AM
Maineiac

rk, just another example of the cure being worse than the disease huh? To be diabetic and have to use these sugar substitues and then find out that it bad for you makes you in the dammed if you do and dammed if you don't catagory.

Linny, thanks for posting it. Very interesting!


04/12/2008 08:09 AM
hipmama42
hipmama42  
Posts: 939
Senior Member

Please, everyone...before you get hysterical or jump to conclusions about

aspartame being the cause of your fibro, or making it worse, please read

these different sites that offer clarity and perspective. Snopes.com

is a website that investigates urban myths and rumors, especially those that circulate on the internet in e-mails and videos.

Based on NUMEROUS scientific and medical sources, SNOPES concludes that this information about "aspartame disease" is FALSE, and offers a lot of proof from various sources, which they list, and the readers can verify for themselves.

http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/aspartame.asp

Actually this e-mail about aspartame being toxic and disease-causing began circulating in 1999. It's been around a long time and still being passed around, and I think it's credibility is often accepted because it sounds so scientifically plausible, factual and well-researched...when it is not verified by ANY credible scientific or medical proof of any kind, from anywhere. Could ALL researchers everywhere as well as the FDA be in cahoots with Monsanto to keep the "proof" from the public?

There would be all kinds of lawsuits if this could be proven to be the case. When the FDA removes a drug or chemical from the market because it causes injury or damage, there are usually large class action lawsuits filed against the drug company who marketed the drug. So far no one has been able to gather evidence to support that aspartame causes disease and death. With its widespread use, if this were the case, then surely EVERYONE would have some toxic disease and the whold country would have MS, lupus, fibro, etc! Even the FDA is not stupid enough to ignore a known human health risk which could harm millions.

I think the reason that it is so easy to accept this aspartame data as correct is that as of yet the causes of diseases like FMS, lupus, MS, fibro, CFS and others are not yet well-understood and doctors and researchers still debating their causes. Many scientists believe that food and environmental toxins may contribute to these diseases, but are not the primary or sole cause.

Remember, everything that we read on the internet is not true! Or perhaps there is a small grain of truth which gets magnified and completely blown out of proportion.

However, studies are beginning to show that those who drink a lot of non sugar beverages with aspartame weigh more than those who don't, and it does make dieting harder...perhaps because it doesn't offer any nutritional value and the body is not "tricked" into thinking it is not hungry and then craves carbs even more and you overeat.


04/12/2008 08:12 AM
meleggs
meleggs  
Posts: 492
Member

I've heard it's not the greatest thing. A friend of mine who's dad is a chropractor made comments of how bad it is.

Only thing- when I was flared I didn't eat ANYTHING with it- I started using stevia which is natural- and after a year I didn't feel any better.

So either it doesn't bother me or the damage was done..not sure??


04/12/2008 08:30 AM
hipmama42
hipmama42  
Posts: 939
Senior Member

I don't drink much diet soda or use aspartame often because I don't like the taste! However, my dad is an insulin-dependent diabetic who drank diet soda, one or two cans a day, for over 30 years with no apparent harm.

It does anger me that some people like to scare folks into thinking that this or that common ingredient (like sunscreen for instance) is going to cause cancer, blindness, MS or whatever -- then they begin circulating e-mails which are spread like a virus around the world via the net like propoganda, and because it sounds scientific we accept it at face value and forward these messages to all of our friends. I think we have to be careful what we pass along and do some research first. Rumors can be dangerous and can cause panic where none is warranted. This is a scary enough world to live in without needlessly causing more worry. The internet is a wonderful tool for research, but there is a lot of false information out there as well.

Here is some more info questioning the aspartame scare and other rumors:

The following article appeared on the website of TIME magazine (TIME.com) on 8 March 1999

A Web of Deceit: Online advice from TIME health columnist Christine Gorman.

Heard the one about the common shampoo ingredient that causes cancer? Or how about the epidemic of blindness among toddlers who accidentally get waterproof sunscreen in their eyes? These absurd fictions used to be the stock-in-trade of ninth-graders bent on frightening the younger kids. But now such tall tales are appearing on the Internet, and many adults are taking them seriously.

Consider the latest electronic health scare: about the artificial sweetener aspartame, which is found in everything from Equal to diet Coke. A widely disseminated e-mail by a "Nancy Markle" links aspartame to Alzheimer's, Gulf War syndrome, lupus, multiple sclerosis and seizures. Right away, the list warrants skepticism. Just as no single chemical cures everything, none causes everything.

In this and similar cases, all the Nancy Markles of the world have to do to fabricate a health rumor is post it in some Usenet news groups and let ordinary folks, who may already distrust artificial products, forward it to all their friends and e-mail pals. I received several copies last week, as have many doctors and health organizations.

When I searched Altavista for aspartame AND brain AND seizure AND sclerosis, I learned that Markle's message is almost identical to an antiaspartame screed first penned under a different name in 1995. None of the specific allegations pans out, however. Among the more outrageous claims:

Aspartame leads to "methanol toxicity". Not even close. Trace amounts of methanol exist naturally in many fruits and vegetables and a tiny amount is released whenever the body digests aspartame. But there's four times more methanol in a glass of tomato juice than in a can of aspartame-sweetened soda, and our bodies have no trouble handling such a small amount.

Aspartame triggers headaches. Wrong again, says Susan Shiffman, a medical psychologist at Duke University who conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 40 "aspartame sensitive" people. A little probing often revealed the real trouble. One woman, who often ate peanuts with her diet soda, was allergic to peanuts. Another subject drank too much caffeine.

Aspartame is responsible for the recent uptick in brain-cancer rates. So how do you explain that the trend dates back to 1973, eight years before aspartame was approved in the U.S.?

Curiously, Markle didn't warn against aspartame's single known health risk. Folks with an uncommon genetic disorder called phenylketonuria shouldn't consume the sweetener because they cannot metabolize one of its ingredients.

Before you decide to believe or, worse, forward an e-mail with serious health claims, do a little checking. Start on the Web with urbanlegends.about.com which catalogues the more persistent rumors. Then go to reliable health sites, like www.mayohealth.org (for general health), www.medhelp.org (especially good for cardiology), www.oncolink.org or www.cancernet.nci.nih.gov (for cancer) or www.navigator.tufts.edu (for nutrition). Otherwise, you might get caught in a web of confusion.

To go to the online archive of TIME magazine click on the link: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/archives

Post edited by: hipmama42, at: 04/12/2008 10:30

Post edited by: hipmama42, at: 04/12/2008 10:33


04/12/2008 08:39 AM
rkselter

Thanks hipmama42,

I wasn't really freaking that bad. I am too tired to freak out. I think I need a new drug.

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