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04/26/2012 05:24 PM

Scared!!! Please tell me: Fibro flare or not???(page 4)

gerinaz
 
Posts: 413
Member

Julzy. It's so hard to know how aggressive to be. I guess it can't hurt to be assertive in your own behalf. If not, who will do it for you. Percoset is what I use for breakthrough. Some people say opiods don't help with fibro but they do help in my case. I sincerely wish you luck with this.

It just occurred to me that my doc is probably more sympathetic because she too has fms, tmj, migraines, etc. Geri

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04/26/2012 05:26 PM
Julzy
Julzy  
Posts: 503
Member

I'm thinking that maybe bc I told her I wanted to get off the Butrans narcotic patch. I was concerned about my liver. But she said this patch won't harm my liver like other orients with Tylenol, like Percocet. My liver levels were a little high for blood tests.

04/26/2012 05:26 PM
mem6526

Most Rheumatologists will not give Percocet or Narcotics. That is why they usually send the Patient to Pain Management. Even then there is no guarantee that they will give you something. I think it all depends on the Doctor. It sucks doesn't it? Geri, Send your Doctor here! Wink

04/26/2012 05:31 PM
Julzy
Julzy  
Posts: 503
Member

Thanks Angel! My pain management doc was super cautious. Just when I got to a place where I could manage the pain, he would pull it from me and put me on something else. I couldn't understand at the time. Now I realize it was bc he didn't want me to bc addicted. He's the one who put me on the Butrans, but iits not working anymore!! And it's supposed to be as strong as morphine!

04/26/2012 05:33 PM
mem6526

Julzy, I am going to post something that I want you to read. I will be right back and I will post it. It is a really helpful article! Smile

04/26/2012 05:36 PM
mem6526

Addiction vs. Dependence on Pain Medications

Pain expert Dr. Scott Fishman answers questions about pain medication:

Q: What is the difference between being addicted and being dependent?

A: Fear of addiction has prevented many physicians from prescribing needed pain relief and many patients from controlling their pain and reclaiming their lives.

Pain doctors have known for years that taking opioids over long periods of time for medical reasons does not have to lead to addiction. More than a decade ago, neurologist Russell Portenoy, who was most recently President of the American Pain Society, reviewed studies of almost 25,000 cancer patients. Most of those patients had been on opioid therapy for many years. Of the whole group, very few showed any signs of drug abuse, drug craving, or drug-seeking behavior.

Every one of these cancer patients was dependent on their medication. However, their physical needs were worlds away from addiction. Addiction is a biological and psychological condition that compels a person to satisfy their need for a particular stimulus and to keep satisfying it, no matter what.

It is a compulsive behavior that demands more and more drugs, regardless of the consequences that lead to dysfunction. A person who is addicted to opioids has a disease that undermines optimal function and drives one to compulsively use a drug, despite the negative consequences.

The pain patient who is effectively treated with opioids finds life restored-even if he is dependent on them. With the pain muted by stable and steady controlled use of long-acting opioids, a patient can reclaim his life, go back to work, return to family life, and pursue favorite pastimes. Dependence is a physical state that occurs when the lack of a drug causes the body to have a reaction. Physical dependence is solely a physical state indicating that the body has grown so adapted to having the drug present that sudden removal of it will lead to negative consequences such as a withdrawal reaction. This can occur with almost any kind of drug.

A good example of dependence is a heavy coffee drinker's use of caffeine. If you are used to drinking several cups of coffee each day, you soon learn about physical dependence when you miss a day or two. This does not mean you are addicted to the caffeine; it only means your body is surprised not to see what it has come to expect.

In the case of opioids, a certain amount taken every day fills the glass, and no more may be needed or desired. If the medication is removed, the consequences are physical (sweating, running nose, diarrhea, racing heart, or nausea), not psychological.

As any diabetic will testify about insulin, or any heart patient will testify about blood pressure medication, dependence is not necessarily indicative of addiction or drug abuse. In fact, regular use of these medications may be essential for good health.

The difference between a patient with opioid addiction and a patient who is dependent on opioids for chronic pain is simple. The opioid-dependent patient with chronic pain has improved function with his use of the drugs and the patient with opioid addiction does not.

I hope that this helps! Smile

http://health.howstuffworks.com/diseases-conditions/pain/ medication/addiction-v-dependence-on-pain-medications.htm


04/26/2012 05:43 PM
Julzy
Julzy  
Posts: 503
Member

This is awesome, Angel! Thanks, I'm printing this out!

04/26/2012 05:47 PM
mem6526

Julzy, You are most welcome. I think it is an outstanding article too! Smile

04/26/2012 06:52 PM
gerinaz
 
Posts: 413
Member

whenever I brought up my concern of "addiction" to my pain people, they would always remind me of the differences between addiction and dependency. It always made me feel better, but the fact is.......if I want to stop taking the narcotics, I would be in deep trouble.. To that my doc doc would remind me that drugs are the only thing that at least help me to achieve "some" quality of life. Without them, I don't know what I would do!!!!! It stinks!!!! Geri

04/26/2012 06:59 PM
Julzy
Julzy  
Posts: 503
Member

That's probably bc your doctors know you well, Geri and trust you. I'm a newbie, remember and they haven't figured me out yet.... Dizzy
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