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10/23/2008 01:57 PM

Inflammation markers

splatterpunk
splatterpunkPosts: 86
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everytime i go to the rheumatologist my inflammation markers are always high on a few different tests. does anyone else here have that? to me it says something is wrong but where do i go from here? the tests are so non specific that i'm not sure why they bother.
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10/24/2008 08:02 PM
Auntie3285
Auntie3285  
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What are inflammation markers ? Are they the same as trigger points?

10/24/2008 08:07 PM
splatterpunk
splatterpunkPosts: 86
Member

no, in my blood work things such as sed rate and other tests show that i have chronic inflammation throughout my body. i also start swelling up because of it.

10/24/2008 08:23 PM
Auntie3285
Auntie3285  
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Okay..thanks...

10/24/2008 08:32 PM
Cori

I am having my SED rate tested too. I don't really know what it means either. scared and confused?? Unsure

10/24/2008 08:35 PM
splatterpunk
splatterpunkPosts: 86
Member

i did some more reading on it and it doesn't appear to be such a helpful test. there's still a lot of guesswork involved.

10/24/2008 08:47 PM
Cori

Sedimentation Rate

The sedimentation rate (sed rate) blood test measures how quickly red blood cells (erythrocytes) settle in a test tube in one hour. The more red cells that fall to the bottom of the test tube in one hour, the higher the sed rate.

When inflammation is present in the body, certain proteins cause red blood cells to stick together and fall more quickly than normal to the bottom of the tube. These proteins are produced by the liver and the immune system under many abnormal conditions, such as an infection, an autoimmune disease, or cancer.

There are many possible causes of a high sedimentation rate. For this reason, a sed rate is done with other tests to confirm a diagnosis. Once a diagnosis has been made, a sed rate can be done to help check on the disease or see how well treatment is working.

Sedimentation rate — also referred to as sed rate or erythrocyte sedimentation rate — measures the speed at which red blood cells settle to the bottom of a glass tube. The presence of certain abnormal proteins in the blood can cause red blood cells to stick together and sink to the bottom more quickly.

An elevated sed rate is not specific to any one disease. Possible causes include:

Infection

Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

Blood cancers, such as leukemia and lymphoma

Cancer that has spread (metastasized)

An elevated sed rate may indicate an underlying problem. But further testing is needed to identify the cause of the problem.

Post edited by: Cori, at: 10/24/2008 20:53


10/24/2008 08:55 PM
splatterpunk
splatterpunkPosts: 86
Member

the dr told me it could mean anything and left it a that.

10/24/2008 08:59 PM
splatterpunk
splatterpunkPosts: 86
Member

i don't have cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus or other stuff like that. although my body is attacking my thyroid. otherwise it's because of diabetes or being fat [in my case]. it's another case of i don't know why so i can't help you [and don't want to bother with other tests]. i'm sorry, i'm just so burned out and bitter about health stuff. i'm not so bitter about anything else.

10/24/2008 09:16 PM
raynedae
raynedae  
Posts: 8219
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My sed rate has always been elevated and new doctors inevitably refer me to hematology or try to send me for an ultrasound of my spleen. I lost my spleen in 1986. My blood work always looks like that of someone who has leukemia or lymphoma. I finally found a doctor who doesn't overreact to my blood work.

Longterm inflammation is really hard on your body. Untreated inflammation puts a tremendous load on your immune system and can lead to cardiac problems, among other things. I'm surprised your doctor is so blase about it.

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