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10/19/2011 11:33 AM

Cordyceps for Lung Treatment.

jodygoat
Posts: 6
New Member

Has anyone tried this for Lung treatment?Please let me know.Thank you,jodygoat.
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10/19/2011 12:25 PM
smokeyjo
smokeyjo  
Posts: 2947
Senior Member

hi jody, i dont think i ever heard of it, what is it. a treatmentt or a medicine.

10/19/2011 02:11 PM
jodygoat
Posts: 6
New Member

Thanks for responding.Actually it is a form of mushrooms and from what I have read on different web-sites it is good for your lungs.I was just wondering if anyone had ever tried it.It is good for many different things.JodyGoat

10/19/2011 02:28 PM
smokeyjo
smokeyjo  
Posts: 2947
Senior Member

not to my knowledge, but i will read up onit also. have u tried it,u read and hear so many things who knows what good for what anymore lmao

10/19/2011 02:48 PM
jodygoat
Posts: 6
New Member

Yes I did take it one time for a while when I had pneumonia.At that time no one had told me I had emphysema.I took about 50 capsules.That was about two years ago.I did a C.T.scan yesterday,before that, one two yrs ago.My doctor is telling me I do have some emphysema.I'm looking to hear from him in the next few days.I'm going to talk to him about taking Cordyceps on a regular basic.I like to try natural things for my health.I'll let you know what he says about using them.I'll also send you some web-sites for information if you are interested (about Cordyceps).Thanks for responding.JodyGoat

10/19/2011 08:28 PM
ThomasHope
ThomasHope  
Posts: 1915
Senior Member

I'm glad you're here, Jody! And thanks for sharing about Cordyceps! We're always interested in new info and new ideas! How much do you know about your Emphysema? FEV 1%? I hope you're not opposed to Vaccinations because that's something we really, really need! Please, let us know! We Care!

10/20/2011 04:10 AM
auntdee
auntdee  
Posts: 2769
Group Leader

Hi Jody!! Pleased to meet you. Yes, i would be interested in hearing about Cordyceps too! Thomas is right, Jody. Vaccinations are very important. Pneumonia worsens emphysema and copd. I get a flu shot every year and a pnuemonia shot every 3 years. I feel safe most of the time. With precautions that it. LOL

Keep posting Jody. We are always up for new information. Thank you.

Hugs,

Doris


10/20/2011 08:10 AM
ThomasHope
ThomasHope  
Posts: 1915
Senior Member

Scientific Name

Cordyceps sinensis, Sphaeria sinensis

Common Name

Vegetable caterpillar, Chinese caterpillar fungus, dong chong xia cao, semitake, hsia ts'ao tung ch'ung, yarsha gumba

Clinical Summary

Cordyceps includes the fungus that grows on the larvae of the caterpillar Hepialus armoricanus Oberthuer. Both are contained in the product and both are consumed. Cordyceps is used for a wide range of conditions including fatigue, sexual dysfunction, coughs, and as an adaptogen or immune stimulant. In vitro and animal studies show antitumor, radioprotective, and antidiabetic effects. In addition, cordyceps enhances recovery of mice with taxol-induced leukopenia and increases the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

In a recent study cordyceps improved renal function in patients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

Although no known drug interactions exist, blood glucose should be monitored in diabetics using cordyceps due to possible hypoglycemic effects.

Animal studies showed proliferation of progenitor red blood cells. Therefore, cordyceps should not be used by those with myelogenous type cancers.

Cordyceps also stimulated testosterone production in mice. Whether it exerts similar effects in humans is not known.

Purported uses

Bronchitis

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders

Cough

Fatigue

Hepatitis

High cholesterol

Immunostimulation

Sexual dysfunction

Strength and stamina

Constituents

Protein: Amino acids

Sterols: Ergosterol

Polyamines: Spermine, spermidine, putrescine, 1,3-diaminopropane

Fatty acids: Oleic, linoleic, palmitic, stearic acid

Nucleosides: 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin)

Saccharides: D-mannitol, galactomannin

Mechanism of Action

Cordyceps stimulates the number of T helper cells, prolongs the survival of lymphocytes, enhances TNF-alpha and interleukin 1 production, and increases the activity of natural killer cells in cultured rat Kupffer cells. Enhanced proliferation of erythroid progenitor cell in the bone marrow of mice is also shown. One study suggests that cordyceps can stimulate progesterone production in animal cells. Another study shows that cordyceps may be effective against tumor celIs by down-regulating MHC class II antigen expression. In addition, anecdotal data suggest reduction of cyclosporin and aminoglycoside-induced renal toxicity, although the mechanism of action is not known.

Adverse Reactions

None reported.

Herb-Drug Interactions

Hypoglycemics / Insulin: Cordyceps may have additive hypoglycemic effect.


10/20/2011 08:15 AM
ThomasHope
ThomasHope  
Posts: 1915
Senior Member

In low-oxygen environments, mice treated with Cordyceps survived up to three times longer than those left untreated, evidencing more efficient oxygen utilization in those that were treated. Its long history as prevention and treatment of altitude sickness also lends credence to the theory that Cordyceps promotes more efficient oxygen utilization.

Cordyceps sinensis has been used effectively to treat Bronchitis, Asthma, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). It has been shown to inhibit tracheal contractions (especially important for asthma patients) by promoting increased airflow to the lungs. In addition, Cordyceps' anti-inflammatory properties bring further relief to asthma patients, whose airways become obstructed due to an allergic reaction resulting in swelling of the bronchial pathways.

In a clinical trial involving 50 asthma patients, Cordyceps averaged 81.3% effectiveness against asthma symptoms in just five days, while conventional antihistamines proved only 61.1% effective after an average of nine days.

Extensive clinical studies have been conducted, treating a wide variety of respiratory illnesses, including asthma, COPD, and bronchitis, with Cordyceps alone or as an adjunct to standard antibiotic therapy, and Cordyceps has proven beneficial for all these indications. What has been observed for centuries in Asia — that Cordyceps improves respiratory function — is now proven and accepted scientific fact.


10/20/2011 08:16 AM
ThomasHope
ThomasHope  
Posts: 1915
Senior Member

Overview

Cordyceps grows on dead caterpillar bodies lying on the ground. A black, blade-shaped fungus, the mushroom grows from the caterpillar and fills the carcass with mushroom fiber. The mushroom grows mainly in the highlands of Tibet, where people gather the fungus for medicinal use and commercial distribution. The mushroom functions as a medicinal that Chinese medical practitioners utilized for thousands of years, says the Institute for Traditional Medicine. Before using the mushroom medicinally, discuss its effects with a medical care provider. Cordyceps has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, which cautions against pregnant women using any kind of herb without consulting a doctor.

Respiratory Treatment

Cordyceps increases oxygen in the lungs and reduces lung inflammation. It behaves as an expectorant and also functions as a bronchial dilator. These functions can make it a useful and effective tonic for the treatment of the respiratory system. In Tibet and Nepal, the respiratory benefits of cordyceps prevent and treat altitude sickness. Naturopathic physician Jill Stansbury recommends using a concentrated cordyceps extract and suggests using 400mg, twice per day.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/365340-cordyceps-sinensis- benefits/#ixzz1bKr6XjxC

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