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09/12/2011 02:52 PM

Constant back pain

TheVoiceUnspoken
TheVoiceUnspoken  
Posts: 9
Member

My name is Crystal, I'm 21 and I suffer from Chronic back pain since I was in a car wreck going on 3 years ago. I can't go a day without pain and it really gets to me. I went to school for massage therapy but due to the wreck, I am not able to practice. I graduated school and everything after the wreck had happened (even though I had to drop out for 6 months), but it got to the point where I couldn't give an hour massage without crying. I've been to a chiropractor, physical therapist, a spine specialist, and even my regular doctor. I've had 3 or 4 different sets of xrays and I've also had I believe 2 MRIs done to try to find what the problem is. No one can seem to tell me what's going on in my back. I had to sell my massage table because it was messing with my head. I love massage more than anything but I can't practice it because of my pain. My heart is broken even after 3 years. I just want someone to be able to tell me what's wrong with my back. I'm only 21... I want to be able to be a 21 year old athletic, energetic, massage therapist. However I know I can't. I live every day wondering why. It hurts me so bad both physically and emotionally. I just want to be able to be happy and do what I love doing....
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09/13/2011 08:05 PM
scorpioj
scorpioj  
Posts: 1397
Group Leader

Hi Crystal,

Sorry to hear you are suffering so much pain, at a time in your life where you should be having fun.Constant pain is hard to take day after day, car accidents often seem to be part of the equation. My heart goes out to you and kudos for finishing the program in massage therapy. Be proud of the accomplishment. It is a grieving process to lose your health and the career you have worked so hard for by getting the education you need and then not being able to work in the field. I was in a car accident 8 months before my RSD, May or may not have been a contributing factor- I'll never know as I had no indication of a problem at the time.I had to leave my career due to the physical demands and get retrained. I did that and got through. I worked for a year in pain and often in tears, finally had to take leave with more health issues surfacing. I know it is hard to give up a career and when you are young as you are, you certainly don't expect this to be part of your life.I hope you can see a aport medicine Dr. or go to a pain clinic they may be able to diagnose you. I saw a Rheumatologist as well as my regular Dr. and they wer stumped. The sport medicine clinic diagnosed me and set me on the path to managing the pain enough to walk a little without crying in agony. Meanwhile we are here for you as a shoulder, a listener, and friend.

Wishing you less pain and a quick diagnosis,

scorpioj


09/15/2011 10:49 AM
mamajo
mamajo  
Posts: 406
VIP Member

Hi Crystal,

so sorry to hear about all your pain...I wanted to write to you because I have a 16 year old who has been struggling with pain issues for two years now. It all started with two ankle surgeries within 6 months of each other (opposite ankle)...I think because of the surgeries, walking on "boots" and walking to compensate for the surgery pain it's messed up her back pretty good.

Anyway...we finally got her to a pediatric pain specialist. Now my daughter also struggles with migraines and the doctor focused more on those than anything - until a couple of weeks ago.

My sister sent me an article on Myofascial Pain Syndrome the day before my daughter's follow-up appointment (she had botox in her head, neck and back)...after I read that article I realized that the doctor's assistant was checking for the same thing! There are trigger points for pain and he seemed to be checking for them. At the end of the appointment I asked the doctor if my daughter had Myfoascial Pain Syndrome and she answered yes, that is what she has. I think the doctor just figured it out during that appointment.

I bring this up because it is not a common thing, but it is also something that can start from a trauma (accident, surgery, etc). There is a special type of therapy that can help (which we've just started my daughter on)...

If your interested in reading on it, just google it and click on the information page from the Mayo clinic...its an easy quick read and gives you all the facts.

Not saying this is what you have, but maybe it's worth checking out.

another suggestion - if you can find a good pain doctor, they might be able to help you out in ways other doctors can't.

Let us know how you do!

All the best to you.


04/10/2012 11:09 AM
pegann
 
Posts: 48
Member

Hi Crystal~~~I was in tears reading your note. I am not 22, but 12 years ago in my 30's, with an infant when I was diagnosed with lupus. Many things happened so fast my head was spinning. Before I knew it,severe osteoporosis,compression fractures and failed spinal surgeries had me unable to get out of bed...at all. I remember the day I had called my direct supervisor to keep her advised of what was happening. She told me on that phone call I had already been "let go"! Without phone or mail notification, I was mortified. I really cried for days. I could not believe the grief. Looking back,when you put real emotion into your schooling, finally find your niche and want so to move forward with your life- it's no wonder these feelings knocked you off your feet. I sometimes still think I have to get up for work in my dreams. I wanted you to know you aren't the only one to have these feelings. I felt too that "the rug was pulled out from underneath" me. It takes some time for your life to pull together and make sense. Or sometimes not, you make a new future and life. We are here to help and support you, feel better, ......pegann

04/16/2012 11:59 PM
scorpioj
scorpioj  
Posts: 1397
Group Leader

Hi manapain,

Welcome to the group. I look forward to getting to know you, we have a really fantastic group here with caring members to support one another.I hope your pain level is low and your life is filled with joy.

Take care,

scorpioj


04/17/2012 01:04 AM
pegann
 
Posts: 48
Member

Hey manapain~~I didn't want to subscribe to that school of thought, but I didn't have a choice. There isn't magic that I know of to EVER completely relieve pain. I would know that because for the last 12 years I have been in severe pain every single day. I wouldn't wish this on anyone. In fact, it's not a school of thought --- it just is....It's the reason I came to MDJ. I can only seem to get a bit more relief than usual when I learn something from my journaling. Maybe another member has something to say that fills in the blank for me that day. I think that just listening, posting and helping another member is invaluable in learning what to do with this whole experience. We are always here for each other....pegann

04/17/2012 06:03 AM
sassym
sassym  
Posts: 348
Member

I had the same problem with getting a "diagnosis". I knew that something was "wrong", having a diagnosis just confirmed the nurse brain in me that needed to know why. I was in my first coma in Feb. 2005. I had Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). What ever I did during that 3 weeks, really worsened my back pain! It took a CT and 3 years of complaining of pain that they discovered the damaged discs in my back. They kept saying the x-ray was normal. Well that is what they said in 2006 about the pain in my hip for 6 months until they did the right kind of CT and found that my hip bones were necrotic (dead), and finally did a hip replacement! The mega steroid treatment I got while in the first coma caused Avascular Necrosis, blockage of blood flow to the bone and bone death. I am telling you this because I want you to know that you should never give up on getting a diagnosis. It doesn't help your pain to know where it comes from, but it may give you more avenues to check for relief. I have found more "ideas" from my friends here that I ever get from a doctor! I had to retire from being the Director of Nurses of a large county jail, with 4,300 inmates, and a nursing staff of 78 nurses after 15 years, and 25 years as an RN. There is other knowledge that comes from your studies, you will have that knowledge, and knowledge is power. Be proud of what you accomplished! Maybe there are other ways to use it, that do not hurt your back?! sincerely sassym group leader of ARDS group

04/18/2012 03:08 PM
prianik
Posts: 3
New Member

Hi there,

I can really identify with what you're going through. I am 26, in grad school, and was a very active, social, outgoing person until 4 months ago. First, 1 of my feet developed severe pain and hasn't subsided since. Then, 15 days ago, the other foot. I am now unable to walk without extreme pain or walk on the outsides of my feet (which hurts my ankles, knees, and hips).

I still have a feeling that this isn't really happening to me. This can't be right. I was JUST so happy, cheerful, normal. I feel like I'll wake up and it'll be gone, but it's still here. And now I am disabled, and the doctors can't really narrow down the reason (bones, fascia, tendons, muscles..) or how to fix it. There's nothing technically wrong but I am in so much pain. I feel completely useless, like a burden to my parents and friends. I am just wasting my parent's money at this point just by existing, but have nothing to give back.

I hope that by connecting on here (I just signed up today) I can find people to talk to and we can together climb out of this depression and help each other. I really hope so.


04/18/2012 09:09 PM
pegann
 
Posts: 48
Member

Prianik, Hello and welcome...I'm sorry to hear you are feeling so badly, so deep inside. I'm not a group leader, just another member. Not too new anymore. I can't even tell you (even in a close guess) how many of our stories start so much the same. When I read each introduction or new post I still can feel that chill up my arms. The next thing I see is that we all go through stages. Stand up for those symptoms, get through to an MD that knows enough to know that he can't know everything--but he might know where to find help. It seems to take a while for unusual problems or vague symptoms. Try your best to start each day with some hope, do what your gut tells you. What help you need is necessary for you to get through each stage. Get as much help for your symptoms of depression as you would for your pain. Any possible way to get support and encouragement is so important. We are always here. I have felt so much support from MDJ, I know we want to pay it forward. I will be thinking of you. pegann

05/05/2012 12:30 PM
mcrough8
mcrough8Posts: 101
Member

I am sorry for all of the suffering you have been going through. I've been there, and am there again. I got tremendous support after I went to a pain management clinic, where they really listened, and helped alot. The Physical Therapists were fantastic, and didn't push, when I was in a real fragile state. Between steroid injections, medications, and good Physical Therapy, I made tremendous progress, to where I had alot of days where pain wasn't a factor at all. The only thing I can say is don't give up. I had some Physical Therapists that made things worse. At the pain clinic, everything is under the same roof, so you are not constantly re-explaining your situation to a Dr., or Physical Therapist that isn't really listening anyway.

I've re-injured myself, and am out of state, and I'm experiencing the frustrations of feeling mis-understood, and having my care dis-jointed. As hard as it is, we all have to let go of the outcome we want, and trust that somehow we will be in a position that we can give back to society, and feel our life has a purpose. It sounds as if you loved being a massuse. You can't do that right now, but that doesn't mean you will never be able to do that down the road. The biggest thing is to not give up until you find a proper diagnosis, and effective treatment. Good luck.

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