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07/08/2011 10:54 PM

My Dad

imbru08
 
Posts: 37
Member

Hello I am 20 years old, and this morning was pretty traumatic for me, My mom came and woke me up and asked if I wanted to go to the verterans hospital with her and my father. My dad has liver disease (cerhosis* sp?) and this morning my mother found him laying on the floor and he was very out of his getting irritable and couldnt get him up. Acting totally different like he didnt even know us. We also had to call the EMT to get him to the car and we took him to the VA. He was very unresponsive at the hospital and didnt remember a thing. It was a good 3 hours, but it all slowly came back to him, and now has to stay overnight. He was kinda drifting in and out of confusion mildly, nothing like what it was at first. I really hope that this can be cured and stayed cured.. I guess I am just scared for the person who was my hero and my everything growing up. It was quite possibly the scariest thing I have ever had to deal with.
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08/09/2011 11:08 AM
imbru08
 
Posts: 37
Member

My dad was acting a little slow lately and went to get his ammonia levels checked and it was 202. That is ridiculously high. Hopefully they give him meds to control it

08/09/2011 06:46 PM
TamieJP
TamieJPPosts: 2315
Senior Member

You might have to ask the doctor to prescribe Lactulose and/or Rifaximin. Sometimes it's up to the caregivers to ensure that the medications are being taken. Might not get rid of the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy, HE, often caused by cirrhosis.

202 is high for ammonia but it's not the only thing that can cause HE. Often times the fact that a person has cirrhosis is the ONLY cause that can be found.

Lactulose causes a patient to have loose stools. With the frequent stools many of the toxins that the liver fails to remove from the blood is drawn into the bowel and expelled.

Rifaximin is an antibiotic that blocks the production of ammonia. (I think).

Post edited by: TamieJP, at: 08/09/2011 07:57 PM


08/09/2011 06:54 PM
mikealpha1
mikealpha1  
Posts: 2286
Group Leader

Imbru, in 2009 when I had my first serious experience with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) my wife tells me my ammonia was over 300 when they admitted me to the hospital. I don't remember anything about the first two days there, and I was in a total of about 5. They were able to bring it under control through the use of lactulose, a laxative. Since HE is a symptom, it cannot be "cured", only controlled. Mild HE was a constant companion of mine for the next year and a half, with a couple of more severe episodes.

So, the symptom is generally controllable, usually through the use of lactulose and rifaxamin (xifaxin). But your father, and the rest of the family, will have to aware of it and watch for changes.


08/17/2011 01:31 PM
imbru08
 
Posts: 37
Member

Thank you both! He is now on lactulose, and is doing better. We are flying out to Nashville to meet the transplant team this week, so I am hoping everything goes well!

08/26/2011 12:14 AM
rsls80
rsls80  
Posts: 52
Member

Welcome to our world I was in your shoes almost 3 years ago I me and my sister were clueless what was going on with my dad till they revealed cirrhosis. I hope all goes well! Smile

04/02/2012 01:25 AM
imbru08
 
Posts: 37
Member

I'm back online. I posted back a couple months ago about how much hepatic encelepathy had taken over my dads life because of the cirrhosis and NASH, but that was only the beginning. He is on the mayo list and the university list for a liver transplant currently number one on the u of Iowa with a meld of 31. His kidneys have been shutting down because of the liver failure. It's just so hard playing the waiting game although I'm so thankful he is on the list and so high. It's hard to be faithful and hope the process works out. Me being 21 an my dad being so sick and sleeping all day really bothers me. I am asking God every night for a liver transplant for him just so he can be around to see my children and his grand kids. He is one person that I know who deserves the transplant and not to suffer and be as sick as he is. It broke my heart when he was in the hospital a couple months ago and said all I want to do is be better, I don't want to be sick anymore. You would do anything to make your hero not be in pain anymore. Sorry for ranting but I know most of you understand what I am going through more than my girlfriend or family. Thanks for the support and if you could say a little prayer for my dad just like I am. Thank you and God Bless

04/02/2012 07:20 AM
sadlystillsane
sadlystillsane  
Posts: 942
Member

imbru08 I am so sorry to hear what you are going through. My children are 24 and 22 so it hits me hard to read how much pain your dad's illness is causing you. I have Primary Biliary Cirrhosis but for now I am much healthier than your dad.

You keep hanging in there and praying for that transplant. Our group here has some members who were successfully transplanted and live full and happy lives. Please read our newsletter (link under the thread ***Attention***) for some info on that. I'm really going to be thinking of you the next while, my son and daughter are 22 so I can imagine how hard this is for you. Keep strong your dad needs you.

xo

Marg


04/02/2012 07:30 AM
mpmom
mpmom  
Posts: 3275
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

imbru08

Sending tons of prayers you and your dads way.

I'm sorry that things are so bad right now. Please take care of yourself too.

Treasure the memories you have and talk to him.

God Bless you and Your family.


04/02/2012 08:19 AM
1polarbear
1polarbear  
Posts: 619
Member

sending positive energy to you for strength and hopefully that transplant will come in very soon!
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