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07/07/2011 04:30 PM

red peeling palms and fingers

TzuWho2
TzuWho2  
Posts: 568
Member

I recently developed red peeling palms and fingers. It starts with white dry like blisters that peel. I have tried everything, including wearing moisturized gloves to bed at night. I have a little on the back of my wrists now too. Maybe it is from dry skin and being on my laptop too much, but because my other skin bumps have increased and I am itchy all over, I wonder if it is from my cirrhosis. I go next week for blood work and then doctor week later so will see if my numbers are up or what - kind of think they are just based on how I have been feeling lately.

I have read about psoriasis and it says that it caused by a weakened immune system, nutritional deficiencies. I have both from the cirrhosis.

Has anyone else had anything similar to this?

They are driving me nuts and the joints are so stiff and sore.

Post edited by: TzuWho2, at: 07/07/2011 07:41 PM

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07/07/2011 04:48 PM
TamieJP
TamieJPPosts: 2315
Senior Member

I had a friend that had tried a new type of hand sanitizer and had the same reaction as you describe. She did not make the connection since she normally used hand sanitizer but something about it was the answer.

07/07/2011 05:15 PM
TzuWho2
TzuWho2  
Posts: 568
Member

Thanks Tamie but it isn't from contact with anything. Maybe my doctor will have an idea when I go to see him later this month.

07/07/2011 06:16 PM
mpmom
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Bonnie,

I have Psoriasis which is a Autoimmune disorder. With it you get thick scaly patches.

This is what yours sounds like

Exfoliative Keratolysis

Exfoliative keratolysis is an excessive peeling of the skin on the palm of the hands and is sometimes called "focal palm peeling." The condition is preceded by an outbreak of air-filled blisters across the fingers and palms, which may be caused by eczema. These blisters inevitably burst, causing the palm peeling. In some patients, exfoliative keratolysis is rougher on the tips of the fingers, leaving harder skin that takes longer to heal. The peeling of this condition typically does not include itching and can be further irritated by exposure to irritants such as soap and detergents. Treatment generally includes avoiding exposure to irritants and the usage of hand creams containing some combination of urea, lactid acid and silicone. In some cases, photochemotherapy, a type of ultraviolet radiation therapy, may be used. Exfoliative keratolysis frequently reoccurs at least once.

Hand Dermatitis

Hand dermatitis, commonly referred to as hand eczema, varies in cause and symptoms. The condition can be brought on by genetic factors, injury, irritants and allergies. Most often, it is caused by working with the hands, making hand dermatitis very frequent in occupations such as health care, cleaning, catering, metalwork and mechanics. Outbreaks can occur on either the back of the hand, the palm or both. Although cases vary from person to person, the condition typically begins as a red, itchy rash that escalates to blisters, peeling, swelling and cracking. Secondary bacterial infections are common and result in extreme pain. Hand dermatitis often spreads to other parts of the body. Treatment for hand dermatitis involves either topical or oral steroids and skin moisturizers. If a secondary bacterial infection is present, antibiotics will be prescribed. Extreme hand dermatitis may necessitate the usage of ultraviolet radiation treatments.

Both are pretty common among non liver patients also


07/07/2011 07:42 PM
TzuWho2
TzuWho2  
Posts: 568
Member

I took a pix of my palm to show an example of how it looks, some days it is much worse.

Post edited by: TzuWho2, at: 07/07/2011 07:46 PM


07/07/2011 07:47 PM
TzuWho2
TzuWho2  
Posts: 568
Member

Dang I have such a hard time add pix.

Trying again.


07/08/2011 04:28 AM
mpmom
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Bonnie ,

This looks like my hands while I was taking antibiotics in March. It's not Psoriasis.

This looks like Exfoliative Keratolysis.

Gail


07/08/2011 07:59 AM
iwiham1027
iwiham1027  
Posts: 938
Member

Bonnie,

Have you ever had a biopsy done of the skin condition. I also suffer from autoimmune (almost everything) I get tiny blister that break, itch terribly burst then peal on the hands, forearms also pealing nails. I was diagnosed with Lichen Planus which is an autoimmune condition, it is mistaken all the time for eczema, and or psoriasis which was the original diagnosis for about 4 years with me. The reason I insisted on the biopsy which can be done right in the Doctors office is because I had piles of prescription creams that did not do any good. Hopefully you will find out what the problem is and then the proper treatment can begin. Good Luck! Cheryl


07/08/2011 11:06 AM
TzuWho2
TzuWho2  
Posts: 568
Member

No biopsy yet but will discuss with doctor this upcoming visit. I bought some psorasis/eczema cream and am hoping that will help.

Gail what helped when you had this? My skin seem like it pulled so tight on my palms and finger that my joints hurt. I sure hope the doctor will have an answer.

Thanks everyone for your help.


07/08/2011 04:49 PM
mpmom
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Bonnie,

My derm gave me a prescription for something that contained urea and some other stuff. I was also told to use only gentle products (soap , shampoo, lotion, creams and even washing powder). I bought everything like I had a new born baby in the house and it did help.

Every once in a while I will still get a blister but not the heavy peeling. For bad cases there are other things they can do. You really should see a Dermatologist.

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