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03/02/2012 01:18 PM

an article argues that bipolar is untreatable

uplifted
upliftedPosts: 285
Member

Here is what i found in an article that was written about the Stigma on mental illness:

It is known that approximately half of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have impairments of brain function that make it difficult or impossible for them to perceive their need for treatment. This is not mere denial, but a biologically based deficit related to the disease process and similar to the unawareness of illness seen in Alzheimer's disease. Neurologically, it is referred to as anosognosia. Since this is true, in order to ensure that seriously mentally ill individuals are receiv- ing treatment so that they will not become violent, a sub- set of them will have to be treated involuntarily. Such treatment is regarded as an infringement on the person's civil liberties and, as such, is politically incorrect.

I used this article,among others, in my assignment paper to prove the stigma often, material written by professionals misrepresent mental illness, thereby causing more stigma

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03/02/2012 03:38 PM
Jarhead75
Jarhead75Posts: 400
Group Leader

Uplifted, could you please share the citation?

03/02/2012 03:49 PM
Perseverance
Perseverance  
Posts: 149
Member

I too would like to read this article Smile

03/03/2012 05:49 AM
InvisibleMe
InvisibleMe  
Posts: 3203
Senior Member

Very interesting! I never thought of myself as seriously mentally ill. Hmmm. I also didn't realize that it's biological not to want to be on medications if I'm reading it right.

Post edited by: InvisibleMe, at: 03/03/2012 05:49 AM


03/03/2012 05:56 AM
Jarhead75
Jarhead75Posts: 400
Group Leader

Before I draw conclusions, I would like to read the research. Some interesting things here http://www.afterpsychotherapy.com/ however, I am not stopping my meds without a safety net! Last time I thought I would never come out of it.

03/03/2012 06:14 AM
lken
lken  
Posts: 2828
VIP Member

i feel that way all the time, i do not take meds, then again i do not believe in the diagnosis, i believe it is something else, i have a lot of the same symptoms and i feel it is different in what others are saying they feel it effects them, i have had my bad times, but not as extreme as others do. so i feel why take meds, i do not like what i hear on how meds effect others.

i read that article jarhead and i agree to this 1st fore sure. Need stirs up anxieties about being abandoned

i use to do this

dependability of other people. She struggled with often uncontrollable urges to binge eat, turning to food instead of people as a source of comfort whenever painful emotions began to surface.

Post edited by: lken, at: 03/03/2012 06:18 AM

Post edited by: lken, at: 03/03/2012 06:21 AM


03/03/2012 04:54 PM
Coskin
Coskin  
Posts: 153
Member

It is very interesting! However, I don't agree with the statesman. I am not a professional in the Mental Health field and I am speaking as it relates to me. Though accepting I had a mental problem was very difficult; I had to face the fact that 30 years of suffering as I struggle to function as normal as I could, were real and there was a reason for the suffering that was beyond my understanding.

The professionals have told me it's BPII, my symptoms match the description of the disorder. I have follow their advice, I have educated myself, I have talk to other people who have remarkable similar experiences and who have also received a BPII diagnosis. I am taking the medications the Drs have recommended. I am 50 now and, for the first time in my life, I am able to manage my symptoms and my life and relationships have become a source of joy. Having said that, I still have ups and downs, I still have to remind my self that is not a figment of my imagination and that the last 30 years of my life prove to me that there was something wrong with me and I could not fix it on my own. It is not easy, medications are just one small part of the management of my BPII, I also have to have a good nutritional intake of food, I need to exercise, I need to have a routine and follow it as closely as I can. I need to nurture my relationships, my mind and my faith. I hope one day to stop all medications, or at least most of them. But, for now I keep on taking them, I don't want to go back to that horrible, horrible state of total despair. It is my understanding that BPI is a much more difficult disorder to threat because their mania is longer lasting and gives them the feeling there is nothing wrong with them. Again personal opinion.

Monica


03/03/2012 05:24 PM
Jarhead75
Jarhead75Posts: 400
Group Leader

Monica, I would like to read the citation before I draw any conclusions. Like you the meds help the BPII, but the mind is complex and wonderous.

03/03/2012 07:09 PM
uplifted
upliftedPosts: 285
Member

here is the site:

://mentalillnesspolicy.com/consequences/stigma.html

go to the discussion part of the article (after the 6th 'dot'), the paragraph that starts with 'the second reason'. The article itself is interesting and is worth reading

Post edited by: uplifted, at: 03/03/2012 07:09 PM


03/04/2012 11:07 AM
zoominsab
zoominsab  
Posts: 81
Member

Your statement even though it was only a small part of the actual paper can actually be true. Not necessarily for us BPII sufferers though. It is known that the manic phase of BPI includes increased self-esteem or grandiosity as well as a few other seemingly positive side effects, like high productivity etc. They often feel as if they are on top of the world. Why would they want to give that up. Even in the down phases you live for the ups. not that I imagine there actually beeing a biological reason for not getting treatment, but there is deffintely a psychological one. Just like some type two Diabetes sufferers that actually don't take medication to prevent picking up weight for instance.
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