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09/29/2007 09:38 AM

How many of you are able to hold down a job?

Watersign
WatersignPosts: 6
Member

I'm at the start of this, and I wonder how many of you (or your significant others) are working?

Full-time? Part-time?

What fields do you (they) work in?

Thanks for your response!

Reply

09/29/2007 10:43 AM
mjo1202
 
Posts: 5
Member

I am "In between" jobs right now. My wife is a nurse , so she's the bread winner now. I am "Mr. Mom" right now. It's getting better. Things were rough for a while. I've always worked. I was always the bread winner. So guess who was feeling like a steaming pile of s*#t.

I have come to accept my role @ home. I'm just glad that my wife understands that having bp ain't easy. I've been sending out resumes and filling out apps. I have to play the waiting game for now. Life's a beach right?

Be easy

mjo1202


09/29/2007 11:23 AM
moody
 
Posts: 74
Member

I am able to work full time. I am a Director of Recruiting for a large company. There are times when it's harder to work and focus or get myself out of bed during a down time, but I work real hard on not letting it impact my work as much as I can. No one at work knows that I have bipolar disease and I keep it like that because I don't want to be judged or watched. I work very, very hard at managing this disease. It's not easy but for me the alternative, meaning having a hard cycle, either up or down, is enough to keep me focused on what I can do and what I can't do within the paramenters of my disease, my triggers, and life overall. I've had to reduce how intensely I used to work because before my diagnosis, I would work 60-80 hours a week and get completely obsessedd with working. Now I know that I have to keep my work close to 40 hours or a little bit more. I have to take time to breathe, or take a break when I feel stress coming on and just overall make sure that I keep an eye out for what triggers me and believe me I don't always see them until I feel a cycle taking over. I've tried working from home but I discovered that I need to be around people each day or it makes matters worse for me. All you can do is do the best you can each day and take things one at a time. Hang in there!

09/29/2007 12:47 PM
Gypsy
Gypsy  
Posts: 1646
Senior Member

Hi,

I am not working and am applying for disability.

I was trying to work, before, I hit a really bad depression. I had been trying to work fo 5 yrs, and couldn't hold a job, for more than, a couple of months. If,I went back to work ,I would work in landscaping. I loved it, and I could move around, alot, and my boss was really open with my schedule. But, I would like to get disability so,I can go to school, and start over in my search for a better career.

Right now, I would like to take time out to get more stable with my bipolar.I was pretty sick by the time I got diagnosed this time. So, I hope this helps.

God bless, Gypsy


09/29/2007 01:15 PM
Watersign
WatersignPosts: 6
Member

Thanks for your replies.

I've not had a problem keeping a job, but that doesn't mean that I've had an easy time working. I'm in Marketing, which can be pretty hard with any sort of mental illness. THere is pressure to be perfect, fast, deadline oriented, the one with the great ideas, the one that is never ruffled and responsive (meaning, jump as the crises arise). When I started, I was parttime, but the job has morphed to fulltime, work-as-we-need-you-to.

I have been having a really hard time for the past few years, and as a single mom, too, I felt I had no choice--I needed to suck it up. But it took its toll.

Now I am remarried and tho we need a second income, we don't NEED me to earn as much as I did. But I don't know if changing careers outright is the right thing to do, too.

OH this sucks so much. LOL

I'm on medical leave right now from work, but I have no idea how long my income continuance will pay out. But I know I can't go back there.


09/29/2007 08:21 PM
bibluepolar
bibluepolar  
Posts: 47
Member

Watersign,

I have to say I do not have a current job nor am I very good at holding one down. I have had a few jobs already this year, which none this year I was able to hold down for more than a few months.

Around last christmas I lost my job at Stream, a computer-related based job concerning serious satellite radios. I held that full time job from Oct. to the beginning of Jan. The longest I've ever had kept a job was for about 4 and a half months.

My bipolar has kept me from working because I get so irritated, emotional, angry and my moods are so up and down that I can't stay consistant. I will end up missing too many days because of moods and not feeling like being at work while being in these moods.

I can't stand loud noises on some days and I definately can't stand being in a crowd while trying to concentrate when concentration is hard enough. I often think people are not being nice or are out to get me, so I will end up getting up and quitting or simply not going into work on purpose just to get fired so I don't have to deal with the confrontation.

Holding down a job has always been hard for me and I often feel like a failure because I am 25 and I am already trying to get on disability.

Do you feel it isn't normal to not be able to hold down a job being bipolar or do you think it is normal? That is my question to you.

Take Care,

April

Smile Smile


09/29/2007 11:13 PM
callme2crazy
callme2crazy  
Posts: 288
Member

None of you are alone in this, working with bp is and can easily be impossible. I have been unemployed since the end of 1999 and on disability since 8-01. This last year I tried to work part time at things I enjoy but had consistency problems. I had to make a career change because what I was doing was high stress and always would be, accounting. Well I just took a part time job as an event photographer and it is working out great.

I tell you this so you will have faith. Don't be afraid to apply for disability if you need to and step back and look at the job you have and decide if it is right for you. All of these are recovery tools and this is a recovery process.


09/29/2007 11:51 PM
newage2329
 
Posts: 3
Member

It has been almost five years and I am just now feeling like I can go back to work. I am in the process of interviewing for a really great company.

I tried working on two other occasions and it was a disaster.Sad I haven't even bothered thinking about working for the last two years. It is just now that I feel my meds are where they should be and that I think I know what my body needs at different times of the year. (my doc also just diagnosed me with seasonal affective disorder)

I guess it is different with everyone but I just keep taking my meds and things seem to keep getting better lately. Thank God cuz it was really rough going there for a while.

Thanks for the post.Smile

Christi


09/30/2007 04:44 AM
carmen33
carmen33  
Posts: 8702
VIP Member

Hi, Watersign, I've been employed since 16 y.o., am now 47, didn't get diagnosed till about 2 months ago, and am currently looking for employment. Have been able to maintain employment even when unmedicated, can't say that my employers were happy with me all the time, but kept me on anyway. I've worked in several fields from waitressing to secrectarial, plants doing manufacturing, cooking, accounting, etc. This trying to find a happy medium is taking it's toll.

Carmen


09/30/2007 06:36 AM
okperez1
okperez1  
Posts: 23
Member

Hi all, I know it has been really hard to work with bi-polar, I have been diagnosed for 28 years, been on so many meds, and am on disability now for this and other things. I worked fron 15 years old until two years ago, not by choice, I had to raise three children. I did really well for a long time and was very successful at what I did, but I do often wonder what my potential really was if I had been normal. It is a feeling of disappointment in yourself, like it was my fault I couldnt be the CEO of a company. Smart enough, not well enough. It truly sucks. Kelley
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