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04/22/2012 08:25 AM

hospital stays

porch52
porch52Posts: 717
Member

Question for anyone who has been admitted to hospital...what is it like? What do you do all day? how often are you seen by hospital staff? What ward do they put you in? Also what is the difference between being admitted to a hospital versus a mental health in-patient care?Ermm I'm wondering if I'm scared to go to a hospital because I don't know what will happen...
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04/22/2012 08:46 AM
bob333
bob333  
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I'm an Advocate

im assuming admitted refers to committed hence u r a danger to either urself or others so u r forced to stay in hospital. The stays tend to b longer if u r committed, also u can b forced to take medication n if u still refused they hav the right to restrain u n inject u in the bottom (luckil this has neva happened to me even when committed). Also, if u r committed u cannot leave even if u feel ready to.

Going into hospital as a voluntary inpatient is a lot less stressful for urself, and it will not show up if u need a CRB for work purposes ie if u work with children or vulnerable adults in the future.

The hospital systems in America r very similar to the UK, where i am from. You are given therapy Monday to Friday, however the amount of therapy does depend on the hospital u attend ie one hospital i attended consisted of therapy from 9:30am to 4pm mon to fri, however, another hospital i attended only had 2 therapy sessions a day and was not as beneficial. Although, depending on ur personal circumstances ie how ill u r u do not need to attend all the therapy sessions but the professionals will encourage u 2 do so n i personally think they r beneficial in ur recovery. During the evenings n weekends its like the hospital shuts down and u just have to amuse urself either by watching TV, playing table tennis, drawing n writing. There is nurses or healthcare assistants u can talk to throughout ur stay at anytime but depending on the staffing levels n hospital depends on how patient friendly they r. Ive had different experiences, some r happy to talk to u whereas other just wana dope u up. I got to see my pdoc twice a week to discuss meds n the overall treatment and before u r discharged ur inpatient team will have a meeting with ur outpatient team to determine ur next therapy steps to try n help u avoid being bk in the hospital.

The only problem with hospital i found is that u feel so safe in ther especially if ur suicidal that when u get home u hav no idea how to keep ursellf safe n just wana b bk in the safe environment. On the whole tho i think if u need hospital then go, i hope this helps

Post edited by: bob333, at: 04/22/2012 09:00 AM


04/22/2012 11:05 AM
BipolarRuth
BipolarRuth  
Posts: 451
Senior Member

Hospital stays have been gereat for me I got my bipolar meds figured out and updosed if needed then i went home with meds and a little bit more knowledge.

04/22/2012 11:20 AM
Yrollam
YrollamPosts: 2491
Senior Member

The hospital for me was different each time I went. One time they didn't have room in a psych hospital so I had to stay in intensive care. The times I was in the psych hospital the days were filled with 'therapeutic' activities and there was also alot of down time. You weren't required to go to the activities but going got you out of the hospital sooner. If you go you can't have things with strings other than your shoes. No belts. All writing utensils are kept for supervised use. If you go I highly suggest bringing stuff to do like coloring or crosswords or sudoku or a book. The hospital was a very helpful place for me to be it helped me get my meds worked out.

04/22/2012 11:20 AM
Cthebird
Cthebird  
Posts: 5961
Group Leader

I've only been admitted to private psychiatric hospitals and only voluntarily (even when I was full blown mixed manic). I'm not sure how state psych hospitals differ, although the one in my state's capital doesn't have a good historical reputation. In any case, the private hospital is actually not too bad at all. Rooms are mostly doubles (I've had a single when I was REALLY bad), the wards I was in looked OK, and there were SOME things to do during off time. Other time was spent in group gatherings, therapy (including sometimes music or art), exercise (kinda optional), and time outside in the courtyard (weather permitting). I was usually on some weight gain med so I also looked forward to meal time Sad. The food where I went was OK. I'm not too picky. In the beginning I ate on the ward. Later in the cafeteria. You'll also have your meds time(s) and vital signs taken throughout the day, as applicable.

My hospitals did not allow electronics like some I've heard of (no cell phones, laptops, I-phones, hair dryers, etc.). They had a TV, games, and things to color. One also had a stationary bike and ping pong table. Perhaps not typical, but I live in an affluent area.

There are some restrictions on what you can bring to the hospitals in my area. No belt, no shoe laces, no razors, no tweezers, and nothing containing alcohol (e.g. certain shampoos, mouthwash). If yours has alcohol they can give you some that doesn't.

At the hospitals I was usually mixed manic or manic so I did a lot of walking and talking in the hallways. I loved that one of the hospitals played music in the ward eating area. I was manic, so I danced in the hallwaySmile. And when I finally stabilized (during my last couple of days), they let me go outside for a walk on the grounds. One of the two hospitals had a mini "zoo" with various farm animals and birds such as peacocks.

When you go to the hospital (or ask someone to pack for you), I would go for light full length pants and pajamas, personally. At my hospitals, if you want to shave you have to use their razors and be watched by an attendant. I'm a woman so I never liked to have them do that. I rather went hairy legged for 2 or 3 weeks. With the pants, nobody knows. Sorry this is gross to mention, but I only strip for boyfriends and my hubby.

If you become severely irate or out of control (w/psychosis or otherwise), they sometimes might put you in an isolation room and give you a sedative shot (usually Ativan or Haldol). This is probably only applicable to fully mixed manic or manic patients, and only, again, if they become out of control.

I have no idea how it differs on the ward for committed patients. I hope I don't find out any time soon.

Post edited by: Cthebird, at: 04/22/2012 11:25 AM


04/22/2012 12:03 PM
hythloday
hythloday  
Posts: 423
Member

My wife went through an involuntary hospitalization due to mania. It's pretty apparent what goes on: a highly organized routine: regular wake up and bed time; regular meals; group therapy; art therapy; individual sessions with social workers and psychiatrists; very regimented visiting hours; and a little bit of free time to do what you like within the confines of the ward.

Probably the hardest thing was that they didn't allow our kids to visit her, though we coaxed a nurse or two to allow them to interact while I was "going through the door." I know that another inpatient was very distraught about not seeing her baby. Ultimately, it was the fastest recovery from mania my wife had ever had.


04/22/2012 01:21 PM
porch52
porch52Posts: 717
Member

In Ontario, Canada, there are a few different choices, I don't know how different they are from the states. There's regular hospitals and mental health clinics/hospitals, and then there's private mental health facilities. I dont' know where I would fit in, but I'm not manic, and not really a harm for myself...so I'm hoping I won't have to find out. I have an appointment with my counselor tomorrow, so hopefully she can explain it better to me with regards to my specific area...

Thanks for all the insight, it makes me feel a little less scared about the possibility..


04/23/2012 05:04 AM
Volante
Volante  
Posts: 925
Member

I have stayed inpatient in multiple hospital and the routine usually is the same. In some of the hostipals they will have morning exercise but thats not always provided by all of them. There are a series of classes you can attend for relaxation and wellness, arts and crafts and outside gardening and games. It is a very peaceful stay as long as you are the peaceful type. It is an excellent escape from the stressors on the outside.

Mental wards have levels where the sickest to less sick go into separate wings. And if your suicidal they will put you on a court ordered hold until you display nonsuicidal tendencies. The hospital staff is great as long as you are cooperative. They cannot force you to take medication unless you are a danger to others and yourself. All in all, hospital stays can feel a little like jail because you can't leave until they find you competent to leave.


04/23/2012 09:56 AM
porch52
porch52Posts: 717
Member

I had a good appointment with my counsellor today. She is going to meet with me for 1/2 hour every day this week, and I will be seeing a pdoc at the very latest next Thursday. I am on a cancellation list this Thursday/Friday so it might be even sooner. Hopefully. She explained the hospital system in the area, and how it might affect me as a person, and assured me that I would not have to be "admitted" unless I was a serious danger. She said sometimes you can just go to emerge and be in a safe place until I calm down. Right now I'm not a danger to myself or others, which is good. Feeling somewhat relieved that I can get in everyday and just work through the stress of finishing this job. 4 1/2 more days, it's crazy!

04/23/2012 11:32 AM
Joy75
Joy75  
Posts: 16712
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

That's great that you had a nice session with your counselor. 1/2 hour everyday is really nice. I hope you can get in to see the psychiatrist sooner. That was good that she explained the hospital system. I bet you are relieved. 4 1/2 more days, you can do this!
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