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01/03/2012 09:37 PM

What constitutes a 'suicide plan'?

BlackRoses
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Post edited by: BlackRoses, at: 01/05/2012 03:10 PM
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01/04/2012 03:27 AM
YorkieLove
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That constitutes a plan to me, but I'm no clinician. SarahTroy would be a good person to ask, bc [personal information edited out by Sarahtroy.]

Post edited by: sarahtroy, at: 01/04/2012 01:13 PM


01/04/2012 07:23 AM
uppitywoman
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Having a funeral arrangement in mind sounds like a plan to me. If you are impulsive, then the means doesn't matter. But I am not a therapist and I don't know for sure.

01/04/2012 08:05 AM
BlackRoses
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Post edited by: BlackRoses, at: 01/05/2012 03:11 PM

01/04/2012 08:14 AM
uppitywoman
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If that's the case, then that changes things. Definitely talk about it. I don't know what the outcome will be, but this is something that you don't want to leave unaddressed.

01/04/2012 09:17 AM
BlackRoses
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Post edited by: BlackRoses, at: 01/05/2012 03:12 PM

01/04/2012 02:25 PM
sarahtroy
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BlackRoses, First, I think you'd get the best responses to your questions if you asked your doctor.

Second, I am not a doctor, and my answers are not a substitute for medical advise or treatment.

To answer your question, I don't think there is such a thing as an "outline for what a 'typical' suicide plan" is. You are correct in that one of the things clinicians look for when evaluating a person for suicide potential is whether or not they have a "suicide plan."

But I believe you have over-thought the meaning of a "suicide plan." For example, the following are considered "suicide plans:"

- "I'll jump out of an airplane without a parachute."

- "I'll drive my neighbor's truck over a cliff."

- "I'll disembowel myself with a knife."

- "I'll cut my wrists."

- "I'll take all my pills."

Next, these "plans" are evaluated for other variables, such as means, access to means and lethality.

Suicidal intent does not have to be present for one to be considered to have a plan. Nor do many of the other variables you have specified, such as burial plans, time and place, etc.

In my opinion, you clearly have many suicidal plans. Your potential suicidal risk at any given point in time is another issue. This is what your doctors and therapist need to evaluate. In order to evaluate this, they need to be aware of your chronic or obsessive suicidal planning or thinking. Let them ask the questions they need to ask; let them do their job.

I would hope for the best response to discussing chronic suicidal ideation by starting off talking about it in a matter-of-fact way. I would also "prepare" them by telling them this might be upsetting news, and that I want to make it clear I did not feel I needed to be hospitalized.

In my own struggle with chronic suicidal ideation, I found it an enormous relief to be able to share my battle with my therapist. Often, over the years, he would ask me about it in a shorthand way, "How goes the battle?" I found that so comforting.

Post edited by: sarahtroy, at: 01/04/2012 02:36 PM


01/04/2012 05:14 PM
GirlDotson
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Thank you for asking...and thank ya'll for answering.

01/04/2012 06:10 PM
BlackRoses
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Post edited by: BlackRoses, at: 01/05/2012 03:13 PM
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