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05/22/2011 09:30 PM

why so many drugs?

24loquitas
24loquitasPosts: 241
Member

No offense to anyone but why do some people take like four, five or six different medications? How do you function on all these meds and aren't you worried about the effects on your organs? I am only on one medication, is that normal or do you normally need more than one?
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05/22/2011 11:17 PM
HopefulOne40

Some people have more than one diagnosis...and the PDOC is trying to get them stablized...

Just like you, I also only take one medication and for me that is all I need...for now..The important thing is that meds are being taken....My PDOC said that once a person with BP stops taking their meds after being on them for any length of time, that it is very hard to try to get that person stablized ...because BP is all about the imbalance of the chemicals in a persons brain...This is why we have hi's and lows... Research some of the information that they post on this site and also some of the people in the BP forum are very educated on this illness.... God Bless, Michelle


05/23/2011 04:00 AM
bpjourney
bpjourney  
Posts: 484
Member

For me personally....I went through many many meds trying to find one mood stabilizer that I could stabilize on and simply couldn't.

My pdoc said that for me personally, my illness worsened over time because it not only went undiagnosed for so long, but misdiagnosed as depression for 24years. I was then put on anti-depressants in my 20's which kept me manic most of the time with depressive crashes until I was finally diagnosed with BPI at the age of 37 in 2007. I was very ill by that point and very difficult to stabilize. It took a long time and a lot of different tries with meds to get me to stabilize.

I hate taking so many meds and yes, I definitely worry about the long term effects on my body. At the same time, me without the meds is a very ill and very unstable person. That's not living and I chose stability & happiness over the long term risks.


05/23/2011 04:12 AM
ApRiLGeTsAngry77

The reason that some people are on multiple meds is because each particular med or mood stabilzer does well at treating one symptom but maybe not so much as the others. Therefore some people need more than one mood stabilzer. I am little concerned about the long term side effects of my meds but I know that I can't live a fulfilling life without them so it makes it worth it.

05/23/2011 07:35 AM
24loquitas
24loquitasPosts: 241
Member

All makes sense. Stability is worth it.

05/23/2011 07:46 AM
pirateprincess421
pirateprincess421  
Posts: 31179
VIP Member

I take only 5, but each one does a certain thing.

One for sleep

Anxiety

Mood

Depression

and another mood stabilizer.

They work. I am stable.


05/23/2011 08:11 AM
YorkieLove
YorkieLove  
Posts: 7033
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

I also take several. I think bc I was misdiagnosed or.undiagnosed for over twenty years. In fact, the medications they gave me for depression and ADHD actually made my bipolar more severe. Each mood episode you have makes you that much more likely to have more severe episodez which are closer together. Look up kindling.

I need two mood stabilizers because I was having mixed episodes. One works better for mania and one for depression. I take an antidepressant bc without it I become suicidal. I take an antipsychotic for clear thinking and racing thoughts. Finally, I take a sleep aid bc most of the time I don't sleep without one. Oh yeah, and I take propranolol for tremors caused by lithium and chest tightness caused by anxiety.

My pdoc monitors my vitals closely and so far so good. Without my meds, I would be dead anyway, so it's worth the risk.


05/23/2011 08:13 AM
sarahtroy
sarahtroy  
Posts: 14317
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

As I understand it, each medication effects certain neurotransmitters in the brain. One medication addresses neurotransmitters in one area, and a second medication is added to address neurotransmitters in other areas, and so on. I'm sure this is grossly oversimplified, but you get the idea. It translates into each medication addressing certain symptoms.

Once a patient has achieved stability, it is common for their pdoc to attempt to reduce or eliminate medications to determine the least amount of medication a patient needs to maintain stability. This is to ensure the patient is not on much medication or unnecessary medication and is considered good practice.

Post edited by: sarahtroy, at: 05/23/2011 08:16 AM


05/26/2011 07:23 PM
danzig
Posts: 60
Member

Believe me I doubt any of us like taking so many pills a day. Popping 10 pills a day is no fun but the alternative is far worse.
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