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02/08/2010 04:40 PM

What Do You Do To Feel Better??

MixedEmotions143
MixedEmotions143  
Posts: 139
Member

I was wondering if anyone else does certain things to help make them feel better? I shop! I get these urges to spend money and buy something new. Luckily it isn't to the point that has me in a financial rut but still! I LOVE shoes and every pay day I have to go buy a new pair. Or when money is really tight I'll go to the dollar tree and buy a bunch of things I don't really need but it feels good! I am only like this when I am off my medicine (although I have always loved shoes). What do you do? Is there a way to stop the feeling of needing to buy something?
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02/08/2010 04:45 PM
tickingcounter
tickingcounterPosts: 1426
Senior Member

Each paycheck (I get paid 1st of each month) I try to buy myself ONE thing just for me. PURSES are my vice. I love my Dolce & Gabanna purse (PLEASE NOTE: I buy these out of the backs of vehicles, from flea markets so please do not think I make extravagant amounts of money monthly LOL).

Also, if I have no monies... I play piano when I feel bad. I've played piano for 17 years and just bought a new digital piano *goes over and rubs it lovingly* with my tax money. Smile I also play guitar.

When I am too low though I am unmotivated to DO anything creative so I watch movies a lot to remove myself from real life and put myself in someone else's story.


02/08/2010 04:52 PM
MixedEmotions143
MixedEmotions143  
Posts: 139
Member

Watching comedies seem to help me too...I love to laugh!

02/08/2010 05:27 PM
capecod84
capecod84  
Posts: 1820
Senior Member

I avoid staying in my room with the door shut. I go sit in a room with people even if I don't say anything. Chances are I will start talking about something. Trying not to isolate is the key. I also exercise. Watching the movie Office Space always makes me laugh so do reruns of I love Lucy. I also pick up the phone and call someone.

02/08/2010 05:30 PM
marisaH
marisaHPosts: 357
Member

I love to spend money (not too much or it'll reverse and make me feel bad), be on this site, listen to music, eat dark chocolate, make some tea, go to the library, cook, pet my pets, take care of my plants, cuddle with my honey, talk with the kids, watch frivolous TV, read, read celebrity gossip online, make a wishlist on Amazon.com...that's all I can think of right now.

02/08/2010 07:35 PM
MontyShift
MontyShiftPosts: 58
Member

Exercise always makes me feel better, but sometimes its so damn hard to get going so I join a class. I know when I've been "balanced" I always had a group to go to. I ran 5 half marathons that way. Got my Green belt in Kung Fu. Also, starting a big project seems to have worked: I changed the flooring in 1/2 of my house and built a garden shed from scratch (but that could be hypomania...).

Anyway, I'm currently taking a Tai Chi class and it really helps. I feel very focused and aware of how I feel. Also, I look forward to seeing the people at class, which helps get me motivated when I'm down.

Hope that helps!


02/08/2010 08:02 PM
MixedEmotions143
MixedEmotions143  
Posts: 139
Member

I enrolled in some gym classes too Monty..only problem is getting there haha! I have no motivation! AND I just ripped out all the carpeting in my living room. I want to get some pergo(laminate) flooring instead. Now I just need to figure out how much of the flooring I'll need...I should of planned this out a little better before I went and tore all the carpet out! lol

02/08/2010 08:19 PM
Alwaysdifferent
Posts: 415
Senior Member

I'm in a mania state right now. I am a rapid cycler; and I don't mean fast bicycler! Anyway I thought I would add my two cents to your question from a scientific perspective. If you have ever read anything regarding the study of quantum physics they can now prove without a shawdow of a doubt that everything is pure energy. Following that train of thought when then get to the quantum level of energy they find that there is two types of energy. High/fast, low/slow energy. When you don't move, when you sit idle your energy is low or slow. Going in action will put you into the high or fast energy. Now as easy as that is to say we all know that with our illness it is easier said than done. I have been a gym junkie for over twenty five years. I go about five to six days a week normally; although there are those times when in deep depression that my head wants to go but I can't move. I will say that very often I make myself go. Once I am there and I get the endorphins flowing (I'm an endorphin junkie!) I am so glad I did and at least for a couple of hours I feel much better. I don't always practice what I preach; but hell I'm bipolar...

02/09/2010 05:54 AM
Drucilla
Drucilla  
Posts: 380
Member

I lie on the bed and holler "I need some COMfort!!!" I've got this old 30 pound red tom who has learned over the years to come trudging to the bed from wherever he was perfectly happy, and lie down beside me so I can scooch into him & just pet good cat fur.

I journal, and I draw with pencil, colored pencil, or crayons. I'm trying to make the big reach back to paint and canvas, but the thought of it makes me queasy so far. Not ready yet. Baby steps.

I've never been a shopper, about 5 minutes in any crowd and I'm snarling at old ladies and little kids. I know the route through Walmart and can do $400 worth of grocery shopping in 10 minutes, while my beloved is still stuck in the candy aisle deciding between Reese's and Mr. Goodbars.

Oh, and I bake! It has emerged as the one thing that soothes my soul. I don't follow recipes any more, I know basically what it takes to make a cake rise or cookies stay flat. This has become my best release of late. Drucilla


02/09/2010 06:40 AM
Dit
Dit  
Posts: 14066
Group Leader
I'm an Advocate

Pray and meditate, walk the dog, watch TV, listen to music, come online to mdjunction, talk to someone close to me about how i'm feeling, journal

Post edited by: Dit, at: 02/09/2010 06:45 AM

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