MDJunction - People Helping People
 
Ask a Question
02/05/2010 01:41 AM

Do you guys really think this is a "disorder"

Bribarian
BribarianPosts: 16
Member

uh oh, somebody is in denial. Hear me out though. I've loved life. I really have. I have had the ability to enjoy such small things in life and be content. I've never had the ambition that others have.

Now I know you're going to jump down my throat in anger that I dare question the psychiatric community, but seriously, how much do they know? We've been around for thousands of years now.

These doctors are infants looking at an engine. No offense to anyone in the medical community, but when it comes to the brain, it's much more complicated than replacing a limb.

We're all effected differently as well. What's the set standard on emotions? Who is the model? When is it appropriate for one person to be excited, and the other to feel sad?

Who benefits most when something is labeled a disorder? Certainly not us. Maybe I'm just going off on one of my "crazy manic episodes" but the stigma of labeling something a disorder sometimes bothers me, especially by groups of people who barely understand what's going on themselves.

The funny thing is two weeks ago I was taking a measely 5 mg of Lexapro, now I'm taking Seroquel, ativan, and 10mgs of Lexapro after having a traumatic event happen, there's more going on here people. I know there's something in us to break the cycles. I believe it.

/end rant

/pop seroquel

Post edited by: Bribarian, at: 02/05/2010 01:53 AM

Reply

02/05/2010 02:35 AM
Lrose35
Lrose35  
Posts: 1732
Senior Member

Well the phamacutical companies benefit largely as do most of our pdoc's get to line their pockets. But I dont think its a conspiracy. Back in the day they would just put you in an Asylum and call you crazy. I think I would rather live now when they understand that it is a mood disorder. There is nothing magical about it. It is a mood disorder.

02/05/2010 12:36 PM
bagofcandy
bagofcandyPosts: 1259
Senior Member

I hear you. Go read the Mad Traveler. Maybe it's the new fad. But then again maybe not. And if meds help, why not take them?

02/05/2010 12:53 PM
YorkieLove
YorkieLove  
Posts: 7033
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

Labels are descriptions of sets of symptoms or traits. There are labels for everything: happy, sad, tall, short, fat, thin, mother, father, friend. Really a label is only a negative thing if we make it one. Labels help us communicate more effectively, especially regarding illnesses.

As far as medication goes, I am grateful that we have it so I don't have to suffer endlessly or go insane and be committed like times past.


02/05/2010 04:00 PM
ApRiLGeTsAngry77

I think I was either properly diagnosed as bipolar or am now medicated to be bipolar. It is very clear who benefits from bipolar.

02/05/2010 06:59 PM
harobed
harobed  
Posts: 1152
Senior Member

Bribarian - I've known several docs that have BP so I think there is some awareness in the field.

I also hate labels, but am so glad that those infants have made enough advances in my disorder so that by taking a couple pills I'm able to talk sensibly, maintain relationships, work and work well. Wink

H.


02/06/2010 06:47 AM
debiski
debiski  
Posts: 5493
VIP Member

The psychiatric community and the pharmaceutical community go hand in hand. The pharms give pdocs plenty of incentives and perks. In return, some pdocs manage to diagnose a large percentage of people who seek help with a dx that requires meds.

Not saying that ALL dx's are not legitimate, but I'm quite sure that there's a good number of people out there taking meds needlessly.

I've been made to wait several times at my pdoc's office while some suit-wearing idiot gets in front of me to sell his wares. My pdoc is great about it. He basically tells them to shove it and not come back during appointment hours.

And have you seen the promo items at your doctor's office? Clocks, pens, notepads, tissues, calendars. How much more free PR can a company get?? Geez--a person seeing tons of advertising for <insert drug of choice> and is promised amazing results will practically beg their pdoc to let them try the panacea.

There are TONS of legit dx's, but mental problems are a tough one. Is BP real? I don't think anyone really knows. The brain is a very complicated thing that is very much a mystery. Until the true workings of the brain are revealed I don't think any psychiatric diagnosis will be seen as 100% correct.

A good pdoc will dx you according to the symptoms you present. I believe that the definition of a disorder is something like "a group of similar symptoms", so in that case BP would be a real disorder. ATM when it comes to the brain, grouping symptoms together is the best that can be done.

As far as where the disorder originates, I guess which group of symptoms that comprise the list of similarities is at the discretion of the person inventing the name of it.

Post edited by: debiski, at: 02/06/2010 07:01 AM


02/06/2010 07:04 AM
bipolarnotcrazy
bipolarnotcrazy  
Posts: 132
Member

I believe that I have an atypical way of looking at world which makes me diagnosed as "bipolar". But the meds work, and they keep me numb (which I like lol) so I'm not complaining. I think looking at the world in a different way causes challenges in following stereotypical societal roles such as going to work, school, keeping relationships with people who are "normal" (the normal people seem to be the most unstable to me anyway.) so if your meds help you then all the better, if they don't then there isn't a point in taking them if your "bipolar" doesn't ruin your life.

02/06/2010 07:36 AM
harobed
harobed  
Posts: 1152
Senior Member

Threads like this are very troubling to me. If you're in denial get a 2d, 3d or even 4th opinion. I did and kept getting the same result - don't tell the new pdoc what the old pdoc said, just a "cold" visit. See a tdoc if needed.

As to meds - if I go to a doc and there's a new kidney med it won't be subscribed to me because I don't have kidney disease. I admit that I was prescribed "new/experimental" BP drugs, but I did have BP and so that made sense.

It is normal for folk to want to deny or find reasons why they do not have certain illnesses. i.e. all my schizophrenic clients (for SS disability cases) adamantly refuse their dx. While they are they're also spouting conspiracy theories, stopped taking baths, and sometimes are wearing tinfoil on their heads. In other words the denial just reinforces the dx.

OK... I don't LIKE having BP, I wish I didn't, but I wasted a lot of years when I could've felt better if I'd approached this disorder with a bit of common sense.

I wish you all the best!

H.


02/06/2010 08:12 AM
uppitywoman
uppitywoman  
Posts: 42705
VIP Member
I'm an Advocate

I learned to accept my diagnosis because the medications for it have saved my life from the insanity I had. If I am not bipolar then why would they help me? But they do, so the diagnosis must be correct. I know there is a real stigma about mental illness so I do not advertise it generally, but accepting it and taking the meds has made it possible to have a good marriage, a good job and be an easier person to live with all around. That's just how I approach it.
Reply

Share this discussion with your friends:
<< Start < Prev 1 Next > End >>


Disclaimer: The information provided in MDJunction is not a replacement for medical diagnosis, treatment, or professional medical advice.
In case of EMERGENCY call 911 or 1.800.273.TALK (8255) to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Read more.
Contact Us | About Us
Copyright (c) 2006-2014 MDJunction.com All Rights Reserved