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01/21/2012 05:29 AM

internet search and WebMD

barelymanic
barelymanic  
Posts: 3253
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I have got to say I really don't know why people recommend WebMD or why it ranks so highly. Both doctors I have talked, materials I have seen written (brochures, etc from docs) and more credible web sites such as the Arthritis foundation say many things different from WebMD.

So it seems to only create confusion and has too much misinformation.

Now I am done ranting.

I did look up how many kinds of arthritis there are and the list was much longer than I expected. The list had only two links on the page and one was to osteoarth and the other to rheumatoid arth.

I looked at both and have to admit to be confused still, because I have the fatigue which may be from my bipolar (but it has gotten worse recently) and the arth foundation claims that the stiffness is in the morning which mine is not (actually morning is my best time) plus they say to keep the joints moving. Well it's moving them that creates the pain. They do advise aquatic exercise for the joints (especially the hip).

So I am thinking that the best thing for me might be to at least consult with a rheumatologist. Is that the correct term?

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01/21/2012 05:59 AM
Catfishes24
Catfishes24  
Posts: 1663
Senior Member

A rheumatologist is a good idea; they not only work with arthritis (all kinds of arthritis) patients, but many other things that afflict us humans in our joints & muscles, and I think bones, too. I am not 100% positive, but I think one of my friends found out she had fibromyalgia from a "rheumy" (as they are sometimes referred to in chat rooms).

We're all individuals with our body chemistry, so while the lists may include some of the symptoms you are seeing you don't have to have experienced them all to be diagnosed.

The rheumy may be able to further decide what type of OA you have, give you more info on how to live with it, what to do to treat it, and what to expect in the long term. Check with the arthritis.org website for a local chapter that may be able to point you to a good rheumy.

Best of luck - PM me if you need me for anything. My OA is not my main health challenge, but I have just enough knowledge to be a little dangerous. Smile


01/21/2012 06:22 AM
DonnaEvans77
DonnaEvans77  
Posts: 3031
Senior Member

I agree with you about WebMD, I have found it very useless. A rheumy doctor would be the better way to go. That's what I need to do, but due to all the medical expenses I have at the moment, and needed to get my teeth worked on, I just can't do it at this point, but whenever I'm all caught up on the expenses, I plan to have my regular doctor set me up with a rheumy doctor. Smile Donna

01/21/2012 07:13 AM
barelymanic
barelymanic  
Posts: 3253
VIP Member

I am sorry to hear that you can't see a rheumy at this time. I have to hurry as i have no income (and my boyfriend has very little as well) and only temporary medicaid. I may loose it as soon as the end of March.

That's because I have abnormal cells in my cervix, once they are successfully removed I will lose the medicaid. Since they are only low grade cells and I have a highly experienced doc it's very likely that the operation (leap procedure) will be successful and the abnormal cells gone.

I just have to call them and found out if the coverage ends the day they receive the report from him or at the end of that month. I hate playing beat the clock.


01/21/2012 08:25 AM
hatbox121
hatbox121  
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I do agree that seeing a rhum is a good idea. And yes, there are 100 types of arthritis. I did a post here at one point about them. It could be that arthritis isn't what is going on with you. In general, arthritis leads to stiffness in the morning and light activity improves it. Now overdoing it or heavy exercise will lead to pain, so that does confuse things a bit. It makes it sound as though an aerobics class makes you feel great when that actually may worsen it for a lot of people. Anyway, everyone is different so best bet is to see a specialist.

01/21/2012 08:55 AM
barelymanic
barelymanic  
Posts: 3253
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Well I had an x-ray taken of my thumbs. Can't they tell arthritis when they see it in an x-ray. They certainly give the impression that they can.

01/21/2012 11:27 AM
DonnaEvans77
DonnaEvans77  
Posts: 3031
Senior Member

I had an MRI don't on my neck last year, that's how I found out I have arthritis in it. Then I had my doctor do blood work to see which type I have. Mine came out as OA. Have you had an MRI done on your hands? I agree, with being limited on that time frame, definitely get in to see an RA doctor as soon as you can. Donna

01/21/2012 12:08 PM
hatbox121
hatbox121  
Posts: 11022
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The thing about xrays is that it can take up to 8 years for evidence to show up on an xray. MRI is much more detailed, but of course much more expensive and you have to go through prior authorazation for most insurance companies.

The xrays also have a difficult time picking up other things. Things like bursitis, tendonitis, soft tissue swelling, etc are best found on MRI where there is more detail. Fluid accumulation on a joint can be seen easier there as well. It's very possible that you are having more of a tendon or soft tissue issue. I'd make an appt with a rhuem as soon as you can get in.

Post edited by: hatbox121, at: 01/21/2012 12:11 PM


01/21/2012 02:10 PM
barelymanic
barelymanic  
Posts: 3253
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There is now a new type of ultrasound equipment that can see soft tissue injuries. Found that out from the doc who did my carpal tunnel test. He was excited about getting trained on that equipment.

01/21/2012 02:35 PM
Catfishes24
Catfishes24  
Posts: 1663
Senior Member

Sometimes doctors, facilities, etc., will treat patients at a discount or for free if they are trying a new technique or equipment - that doesn't happen often, but it might be worth asking about. I got a free stress test once when a cardiologist was trying out a new type of machine before he made up his mind to buy it.
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