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04/07/2012 09:19 AM

hey there

broken
broken  
Posts: 11320
VIP Member

hello I wanted to re interduce myself, I am Brandi..I worked elderly care for several years and it is my lifes long commintment to elderly care..my favorite people to work with has always been Alzheimers..

I miss the people so much,I was not able to return after an injury I sustained,I wanted to let you know I am here,though I dont post very much but want you to know to feel free to pm me..if you have questions..

I also wanted to ask the group in a whole,I was writting a book at one time about caring for alzheimers,I have so many insperational stories,and ways of dealing with simple everyday things that become not so simple,I have thought about changing the bok into a play (skits) to show the stories and why certain things help the person with Alzheimers and the person doing the care...I learned through all my years of tricks to use.such as putting not an exit on your door,to help with run aways or even a black carpet infront of the door for the same reason...how when a person gets very confused of who you are how to re adjust the thinking,so full of info and want to share it with so many..so my question is if you had an opertunity to see such a demostration would you go? or would you read a book..or would you go to a confrece in your town? just questions I wonder so I know where to begin..and please as I said I am here for advice if I can help I will.I will try and post more and I appreciate your input..Thank you

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04/07/2012 10:11 AM
alznotwell
Posts: 1149
Group Leader

Hi Broken, I think what happens with a lot of AD caretakers is that the responsibilities kind of take us unawares and pile up on us, so that we eventually find ourselves in a twilight zone of exhaustion, worry, work, and eventually, hopelessness and depression. If I ever had two minutes to myself I did not want to spend it thinking about Alzheimer's, hearing about it, or doing anything else about it. I just longed for a normal life, and for someone to do something for me for a change! So I probably would not do anything connected with Alzheimer's, but I am one person. I'm sure there are others out there who feel differently. ANW

04/08/2012 08:59 AM
broken
broken  
Posts: 11320
VIP Member

my thought is more a training type of thing for people who are learning to take care of their loved one,or is working as a caregiver, so many things we kno that truly would help..

04/08/2012 09:49 AM
alznotwell
Posts: 1149
Group Leader

My experience with nursing homes is limited to about nine months, that's how long my mom has been in one, but what I see is a need for intensive training workshops for the aides in the nursing home. The aides at my mom's facility describe symptoms, sometimes with resentment in their voices, that I have been dealing with at home for over ten years. It makes me want to say, "She has Alzheimer's! That is how Alzheimer's patients behave! Don't you know anything at all about Alzheimer's?"

The answer of course is that no they don't. They just thought they were taking on a job where they helped elderly patients with eating, bathing, dressing, etc., and they are very surprised at the bizarre behavior problems they encounter. The sleeplessness at night really seems to set them off. They thought they were going to have a nice quiet time to get other tasks done, or nap themselves, and they get irritated at people wandering up and down the halls engaging in odd behaviors, making noise, going into other patients rooms and waking them, etc. Why do they think our patients need 24-hour care? If it were limited to a nice tidy eight hours a day, we could cope with that at home for a longer time than we do. Lack of sleep and exhaustion are the problems we caretakers encounter. Where they have three 8-hour shifts to care for patients, we at home have a 24-hour shift every day without end, and they are complaining about behavior problems?!!!

What I am envisioning is a consulting-type service where trained and experienced people contract with nursing homes to provide workshops on a regular basis to provide these intensive training sessions in Alzheimer's. There is such a large personnel turnover in nursing homes that constant retraining would be necessary.

The problem with offering training to relatives who keep their Alzheimer patient at home is lack of time, energy, and patient care backup on the part of the caretaker, because who is going to be taking care of our patient while we go off to a workshop? When we say we are on duty 24/7, that is exactly what we mean. This is a problem for all caretakers, and especially those of us who live in the country with no backup for patient care. In this case you might have to offer elder-care sitting services at the workshop for those caretakers who have to bring their patient with them. Just some ideas. ANW


04/11/2012 05:05 AM
broken
broken  
Posts: 11320
VIP Member

thank you,

u are exsactly right about the lack of edgucation, you dont get any and it is a live and learn. a cna is conciderd a dime a dozen.. I was at one nursing home visiting a friend and what I found shocked me..the facility hired non english speaking CNA"S because their pay was alot cheaper..how can an alzheimers patient comunicate..It shows they care about the bottom dollar and not the people..

thank you for your advice..I actually conciderd a DVD for people who can watch from home but that is the future..again thank you

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