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05/23/2012 08:33 AM

Interesting news stories

onlinesales
onlinesales  
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GOSHEN, N.Y. (AP) — Sentencing is set for Wednesday for an upstate New York woman who admits she faked having cancer to con donors into paying for her wedding and Caribbean honeymoon.

Jessica Vega isn't likely to do prison time, but court officials say she'll have to repay $13,368 to her victims. She's been in Orange County Jail since she pleaded guilty April 25.

Vega was living in Montgomery, 60 miles north of New York City, when she launched her scam. In 2010, she said she was dying of leukemia and wanted a "dream wedding" to Michael O'Connell, the father of her baby.

Donors gave rings, a wedding dress and other goods and services. O'Connell later questioned the story and they divorced. Vega was arrested April 3 in Virginia, where she was back with O'Connell.

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05/23/2012 08:36 AM
onlinesales
onlinesales  
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Saw this yesterday within top 25 news stories (shows kids/teens today are different than when we grew up, back when spankings helped curb such when young...lol)

BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Jonathan Hoffman frantically told a 911 dispatcher he had been shot in the chest by his grandmother and was going to die, a police detective testified Monday.

By the time officers arrived at the family's upscale condo in a Detroit suburb, at least four more shots from a .40-caliber handgun had been pumped into the 17-year-old high school senior.

A West Bloomfield Township detective told a judge during Monday's arraignment for 74-year-old Sandra Layne that eight entry and exit wounds were found in Hoffman's body after the Friday afternoon shooting.

Layne has been charged with open murder and held without bond. She stood mute in court when the charge was read, and a not guilty plea was entered on her behalf. An open murder charge allows a jury to decide on whether a first- or second-degree charge applies after hearing evidence.

Hoffman had been attending an alternative high school in nearby Farmington and living with his maternal grandparents so he could complete his senior year while his divorced parents settled in Arizona, according to his father, Michael Hoffman of Scottsdale, Ariz.

Layne's attorneys have said there were problems at the condo, and Layne was afraid of her grandson. One of her attorneys, Mitchell Ribitwer, told reporters Monday that drugs and drug paraphernalia apparently belonging to the teen were found at the condo after Hoffman was killed.

Michael Hoffman said that regardless of his son's behavior, the teen was unarmed and didn't deserve to be shot to death.

Detective Brad Boulet testified about Hoffman's 911 call and said when officers arrived at the condo, Layne was inside, behind a screened door.

"She put the gun on the floor after being ordered so by officers," Boulet said. "She exclaimed she had just murdered her grandson."

Wearing an orange jumpsuit in court, Layne smiled and nodded to her husband and other family members.

Ribitwer described her to the judge as a retired teacher who has lived in the West Bloomfield area for 30 years. His requests for a reasonable bond and electronic tether monitor for Layne were denied. A pre-examination conference for Layne was set for Thursday morning.

Prosecutors had no comment after the hearing. Layne's husband and other relatives attended the hearing but also didn't comment.

Police had responded in March to a domestic disturbance at Layne's home.

"I spoke to the officer who responded, and he indicated this young man was totally out of control in the street," defense attorney Ribitwer told reporters Monday. "He was derogatory to his grandmother. He was yelling and shouting and almost got into it with the police."

Jonathan Hoffman's funeral is set for 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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05/23/2012 08:38 AM
goopy
goopy  
Posts: 7872
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PPL PPL PPL what will they come up with next.

05/23/2012 08:49 AM
onlinesales
onlinesales  
Posts: 1681
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How many remember the zinc lined box for milk or the milkman delivering milk?

Headlines for small dairies going under hit today's news...

My favorite drink is MILK, besides water...

I buy such for $2.99/ gallon, everyday price at Save-a-Lot, local grocery store.

PLAINFIELD, Vt. (AP) — The MacLaren brothers are third-generation dairy farmers, but they will likely be the last in their family.

After working all their lives on the hillside farm in Vermont that their grandfather bought in 1939, rising to milk cows at 3 a.m., even in blizzards and sub-zero temperatures, they decided to call it quits, auctioning off their roughly 200 cows and equipment ranging from stalls and hoof trimmers to tractors and steel pails.

The sale marked the end of the last dairy farm in Plainfield — a small town that once had several dozen — and the 14th dairy farm to go out of business in Vermont this year. A few small dairies have opened, but overall, the number of farms continues to drop in a state long known for its milk and cheese. Farmers say they can't make ends meet when milk prices are low and feed and fuel costs keep going up.

"The day of the small farms, I think, is gone," said Steve MacLaren, 54. "A lot of people are going to hold on as long as they can, but we decided not to. Why struggle on it any longer?"

Economic issues aside, the MacLarens are tired of being tied to the farm seven days a week. They plan to keep the land and grow feed — corn and grass for hay and silage — on more than 500 acres.

"No matter what, you've got a sick cow or a cow having a calf, you've gotta be around whether it's 1:00 in the morning, or it's whatever time, you've got to take care of them," said Michael MacLaren, 48. "But if you've got a tractor break down, you can walk away from it. It's just a long hard grind, and I decided I'd like a change."

While the number of dairy cows in the U.S. hasn't changed much, the number of dairy farms has been dropping as small farms either go out of business or consolidate to become more competitive and cost effective.

The number of dairy farms nationally has dropped from nearly 92,000 in 2002 to less than 70,000 in 2007, according to the last agricultural census, which is being updated this year.


05/23/2012 06:15 PM
Nevayda
 
Posts: 7675
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I remember the milk box. It was on the landing between the house and the basement, right next to the door. My Grandmother would remove the flat cardboard top, spoon off the cream for her coffee, and we all drank "fat free" milk, LOL.

The small dairy farmer has a hard time of it. Other places have mechanized and sycronized the milking of the cows, and can do many at one time. A family owned dairy farm certainly can't compete with that. I know a dairy farmer who is hanging in there, regardless.


05/24/2012 05:33 AM
bilarry
bilarryPosts: 83
Member

I was the small kid on the block, if someone locked themselves out of their house they would shove me through the milk box and I would open the door. That was after the riots of 67, before then no one locked their house.

05/24/2012 06:24 AM
Nevayda
 
Posts: 7675
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Sounds like you were a help to a lot of people. I remember when no one locked the doors. It's a way different world today.

05/24/2012 08:43 AM
bilarry
bilarryPosts: 83
Member

Yes, A lot has changed, and not of the better. We‘ve become OCD with locking our doors and I put on a few "extra" pounds, just to name a couple.

05/24/2012 04:12 PM
Nevayda
 
Posts: 7675
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I don't know if we can change the "few "extra pounds, LOL, but I'm trying.
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