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08/28/2010 04:04 PM

Worst Flu In My Life

angelabud
angelabud  
Posts: 165
Member

Hey All,

Haven't been on in about 4 or 5 days. My husband had stomach/upper-resp. flu from Monday - Wednesday. I never thought about even catching it. But, sure enough I got it Thursday until today. Today, I'm actually able to get out of bed. It was the worst flu I've ever had. Beyond the nausea, diarrhea, vomiting issues, I constantly felt weak, light-headed & ready to pass out if I left the bed. I'm wondering if you guys have experienced typical viruses or infections since your Dx that seem to be worse than when you were so-called "healthy" or adrenal sufficient? I did call my dr. & get instructions on my steroids & he told me to double them. He also said I may need suppositories or IV's if I couldn't keep the steroids down or suppositories in. Luckily, I was able to get my dose in.

It was just scary because at one point I thought I was going to fall of the toilet and faint from how bad I was feeling.

Hope all of you are well & having a great weekend!

Angie

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08/28/2010 06:45 PM
crz49
crz49  
Posts: 1141
Senior Member

Well, Angela,

Doesn't sound like you've been having a picnic lately.

I haven't had a flu instance, but twice since my diagnosis I've had infections that were worse than I'd ever had...each having high fevers. My endo didn't want me to increase my HC...but I did it anyway. My last infection, a doozy of a sinus infection eventually needed amoxicillin to kick it out. I tried to let my immune system fight it, but after 10 days of misery I finally called the doctor.

I'm thinking the loss of fluids from vomiting/diarrhea made you BP drop even lower. I know when my BP is low I feel weak...it's an effort even to raise a glass to drink some juice.

I'm happy to see you back on the board, and happy you're feeling better. Being sick is the pits.


08/28/2010 07:28 PM
bob3bob3
bob3bob3Posts: 4213
Senior Member

Hi Angie

Generally yes. More intense but shorter lasting. ie my immune system jumps up and clobbers the thing a lot faster, especially when I stress dose - which is the proper response to do BEFORE the fever hits. (In my case the fever doesn't hit until I do stress dose - which is normal)

Welcome to the the world of adrenal system engineering. Leave your old "normal person" how-to books in the trash bin!

Bob


08/30/2010 06:22 AM
teri72193
teri72193  
Posts: 1264
Senior Member

Angela:

Do you carry the solu-cortef injection. My Endo told me when we are vomiting and have nausea it is better to take the injection than try to keep the pills down long enough, glad you are doing better!


08/30/2010 11:17 AM
angelabud
angelabud  
Posts: 165
Member

Thanks everyone!

WOW! Bob, that's exactly what happened. My fever spiked to 101 degrees (F) AFTER I stress-dosed. I guess I have to leave "Abby" behind...that is "abby-normal" my old person. I've always been considerred a little "off". Now I guess I'm "addy-normal" - adrenal normal that is. Sorry, I've been up for 28 hours & counting...I'm getting a little wired & goofy here. Had to stress dose yesterday too. Couldn't sleep a wink!

Luckily, my son is at school, husband is at his physical therapy & everyone is letting me sleep tonight. They probably realize that's the better option vs. waking the "bear".

Anyhow, Teri, I asked my dr. about the solu-cortef injection. He said he'd only prescribe that for primary adrenal not secondary? sound right to you guys?

Thanks again for your support. Corri - you always put a smile on my face or a big chuckle in my belly. You three have gone through more than I could ever imagine, but you're the most positive, upbeat people on this site. Thanks for sharing your optimism & wisdom with all of us.

Angie


08/30/2010 11:39 AM
teri72193
teri72193  
Posts: 1264
Senior Member

I am not sure if that is right or not? Bob, don't people with secondary have to carry the injection as well?? I'm not too sure about the wisdom but I am pretty optimistic. I guess I have to be Smile The alternative is the big rubber room, although I hear you get a lot of rest in there.

08/30/2010 12:06 PM
bob3bob3
bob3bob3Posts: 4213
Senior Member

Hi Teri

I do.. I wouldnt use it in nausea situations though, I'd go to the ER instead. I think it more for physical trauma like broken bones and blood loss. It boils down really to how unstable your body is and how much reserve it can call on. I actually privately have the opinoin that docs keep AI patients underdosed so exacerbating the problem.

It also depends on your lifestyle. If you live next door to a hospital and never leave the house you dont need to keep one. If however you international travel by plane a lot you do.

Bob


08/30/2010 12:10 PM
teri72193
teri72193  
Posts: 1264
Senior Member

My Endo had told to me to use it if I had the flu and was throwing up and couldn't keep my pills down, that was the only time for illness. But I was sure it was for secondary patients as well. Thanks!

08/30/2010 01:16 PM
crz49
crz49  
Posts: 1141
Senior Member

...well, Angie....gee,...shucks....we can't be "upbeat" if we didn't have anyone to be upbeat with....you're playing a large part in this, you know.

I sure hope you're feeling better today than yesterday...you "sound" as though you are Smile


08/31/2010 01:35 AM
angelabud
angelabud  
Posts: 165
Member

Thanks everyone! I am feeling much better! Tomorrow I go to the orthopedic in Chicago to find out if I remain in a cast for the next 6 weeks or can use a walking boot. I pray I can use the boot since it's easier to get around with my son & up/down stairs. Wish me luck!

We also need some prayers for my hubby & his job. As you probably know, he's been off work since June 29th when he tore a bicep tendon & his rotator cuff. He had surgery July 14th. Up until today, we were under the impression that his job was secure. We've provided all the medical documentation that states he'd have to be off 3-6 months for recovery & PT. It seemed secure. Well, then I read some information the town clerk mailed to him. There was a page from the Employee Handbook that indicates the town can let him go if he doesn't return to work after 12 weeks. The U.S. (for Bob) has the FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) that protects your job in these situations. But, it's only for 12 weeks. My husband's 12 weeks runs out on 9/19. So, tomorrow we're hoping to get some concrete answers about his job from the town.

I'll feel terrible for him, not so much about the financial end of it. He loves his job as a police officer & worked to hard to find a job like this. He will be crushed.

So, please say some prayers. I appreciate it! Everyone feel better, have a great week & "don't worry...be happy!!""

Angie

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